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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Arizona Hispanics Poised To Swing State Blue

1 hour ago
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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Editor's note: This report contains accounts of rape, violence and other disturbing events.

Sex trafficking wasn't a major concern in the early 1980s, when Beth Jacobs was a teenager. If you were a prostitute, the thinking went, it was your choice.

Jacobs thought that too, right up until she came to, on the lot of a dark truck stop one night. She says she had asked a friendly-seeming man for a ride home that afternoon.

The Boston Citgo sign, all 3,600 square LED feet of which has served as the backdrop to Red Sox games since 1965, is now officially a "pending landmark."

Spanish Surrealist Salvador Dalí spent much of the 1940s in the U.S., avoiding World War II and its aftermath. He was a well-known fixture on the art scene in Monterey, Calif. — and that's where the largest collection of Dalí's work on the West Coast is now open to the public.

Copyright 2016 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

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Redesigned $100 Bill To Go Into Circulation After Long Delay

Apr 24, 2013
Originally published on April 24, 2013 8:30 pm

The redesigned U.S. $100 bill will begin appearing after October with new security features that will make it "easier for the public to authenticate but more difficult for counterfeiters to replicate," the U.S. Federal Reserve said Wednesday.

The improved note was first unveiled in 2010 but delayed due to "an unexpected production" problem that The Washington Post described three years ago as an issue stemming "from what officials called a 'problem with sporadic creasing of the paper during printing' that resulted in blanks spots on some of the newly redesigned bills."

The new note still sports a portrait of Ben Franklin, but unlike the current $100 bill, it will also include a 3-D security stripe and a color-shifting image of the Liberty Bell.

"We've also retained some security features that have proven to be effective in previous designs, such as a portrait watermark and the embedded security thread," says Michael Lambert, deputy associate director at the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System.

Gizmodo has a breakdown of the new security measures here.

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