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Let the record show: neither of those lyrics contains the phrase "all lives matter."

But at the 2016 All-Star Game, the song got an unexpected edit.

At Petco Park in San Diego, one member of the Canadian singing group The Tenors — by himself, according to the other members of the group — revised the anthem.

School's out, and a lot of parents are getting through the long summer days with extra helpings of digital devices.

How should we feel about that?

Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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For Putin's Third Term As President, A New Russia

May 6, 2012
Originally published on May 6, 2012 8:38 pm

On Monday, Vladimir Putin will again become president of Russia. When he is inaugurated in the Kremlin, it will be for a third term, even though the Russian constitution limits presidents to two four-year terms.

The restriction, however, is for two consecutive terms. It doesn't rule out a third term if someone else holds the presidency in the interim. That's exactly what Dmitri Medvedev did. He was elected president after Putin, but declined a run for a second term.

This political swap succeeded, but Putin will be leading a different Russia after his re-inauguration.

Putin has said very little since his re-election in March. He has put away the sharp-tongued, profane, tough-guy image that worked well for him during his earlier eight years as president.

When Putin 'Lost Moscow'

For the last four years, Putin has been running the government as prime minister, and he was restrained when he addressed the Russian parliament last month.

He told the deputies that they had come to the end of the post-Soviet period. Ahead, he said, lies a new stage in Russia's development that can ensure prosperity to citizens for decades ahead.

Since he was re-elected, Putin's public comments have been long on generalizations like this and short on specifics — perhaps because his transition to a third term has been rocked by unexpectedly large and loud protests.

"Russia without Putin" and "Putin to Prison" were slogans that tens of thousands chanted. The anti-Putin movement grew rapidly, surprising his supporters and opponents alike.

It forced Putin to rally his own partisans in demonstrations, with pro-Putin speakers trumpeting that the ranks of his voters would grow.

That did not happen. Quite the opposite, says Lilia Shevtsova, a political analyst with the Carnegie Center here in Moscow.

"Russia started to ignore him, to reject him and the most important thing, he lost Moscow. He lost the most educated, urban population," she says. "He's the president of minority, and his legitimacy among the educated layers of the society and among the big cities is definitely crumbling."

Shevtsova and many others believe the official results giving Putin 62 percent of the vote were based on fraud.

As for Medvedev, many were shocked he declined to run for a second term. He might have been re-elected. Often he was seen as the liberal to Putin's cold conservative, as in a television interview two weeks ago.

"If we are talking about those who protested against the positions of the authorities, I respect their rights," Medvedev said. "I don't agree with everything they say, but they deserve respect."

For many who have taken to the streets, like political analyst Andrei Piontkovsky, there is little respect for Medvedev.

"It's obvious to any observer in Russia and abroad that Medvedev was actually a stooge, keeping warm the seat of presidency for Putin [to] return now," he says.

A Certain Kind Of Freedom

Sometimes it seems there is a tendency to exaggerate the nature of Putin's past record. Piontkovsky first labeled him a dictator, but then checked himself.

"If he was a dictator like Stalin or Hitler, we wouldn't sit in my kitchen and discuss his rule," he says.

The same goes for Shevtsova. Much has changed in Russia for the better, she says.

"I have a freedom to talk to you, and we can discuss Putin's leadership, and I'm not going to be in prison for that," Shevtsova says. "I have freedom to travel across Russia, and I have freedom to emigrate if I chose to. I have freedom to read Internet, and I have freedom to discuss Putin and complain on the streets with my friends."

But the mass media are not free in Russia, and people like Shevtsova and Piontkovsky are banned from appearing on television. The government's control of television is near absolute. The long list of complaints about Putin rarely reaches a mass audience.

Those complaints include charges of widespread corruption, abuses by the police and the judiciary, and ballot rigging.

It is no longer the old Soviet Union to be sure, but Putin's Russia is not yet a fully fledged democracy either. Monday, with Putin once again president, more and more Russians are willing to take to the streets to say so.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

In Russia, some 20,000 people took to the streets today in protest against Vladimir Putin, a day before his inauguration as president of that country. They're opposed to what will be a third term for Putin, even though the Russian constitution limits presidents to two four-year terms. But here's the catch: that restriction is for two consecutive terms. It doesn't rule out a third term if someone else holds the presidency in the interim. Someone like Dmitri Medvedev, who was elected president after Putin, but conveniently opted not to run for a second term. So, Putin is back. But as NPR's Mike Shuster reports, the Russian leader is likely to find himself leading a very different Russia.

MIKE SHUSTER, BYLINE: Vladimir Putin has said very little since his re-election in March. He has put away the sharp-tongued, profane, tough-guy image that worked well for him during his earlier eight years as president. For the last four years, Putin has been running the government as prime minister, and he was restrained when he addressed the Russian parliament last month.

PRESIDENT-ELECT VLADIMIR PUTIN: (Russian spoken)

SHUSTER: We've come to the end of the post-Soviet period, he told the deputies. Ahead lies a new stage in Russia's development that can ensure prosperity to citizens for decades ahead. Since he was re-elected, Putin's public comments have been long on generalizations like this and short on specifics - perhaps because his transition to a third term has been rocked by unexpectedly large and loud protests.

(SOUNDBITE OF PROTESTORS CHANTING)

SHUSTER: Russia without Putin and Putin to Prison were slogans that tens of thousands chanted. The anti-Putin movement grew rapidly, surprising his supporters and opponents alike. It forced Putin to rally his own troops in demonstrations like this:

(SOUNDBITE OF CHANTING)

SHUSTER: Pro-Putin speakers trumpeting that the ranks of his voters would grow. That did not happen. Quite the opposite, says Lilia Shevtsova, a political analyst with the Carnegie Center here in Moscow.

LILIA SHEVTSOVA: Russia started to ignore him, to reject him and the most important thing, he lost Moscow. He lost the most educated, urban population. He is the president of minority, and his legitimacy among the educated layers of the society and among the big cities is definitely crumbling.

SHUSTER: Shevtsova and many others believe the official results giving Putin 60 percent of the vote were based on fraud. As for Dmitri Medvedev, many were shocked he declined to run for a second term. He might have been re-elected. Often, he was seen as the liberal to Putin's cold conservative, as in a television interview two weeks ago.

PRESIDENT DMITRI MEDVEDEV: (Russian spoken)

SHUSTER: If we are talking about those who protested against the positions of the authorities, I respect their rights, Medvedev said. I don't agree with everything they say, but they deserve respect. For many who have taken to the streets, like political analyst Andrei Piontkovsky, there is little respect for Medvedev.

ANDREI PIONTKOVSKY: It's obvious to any observer in Russia and abroad that Medvedev was actually a stooge, keeping warm the seat of presidency for Putin return now.

SHUSTER: Sometimes it seems there is a tendency to exaggerate the nature of Vladimir Putin's past record. Piontkovsky first labeled him a dictator, but then checked himself.

PIONTKOVSKY: If he was dictator like Stalin or Hitler, we wouldn't sit in my kitchen and discuss his rule.

SHUSTER: The same goes for Lilia Shevtsova. Much has changed in Russia for the better, she says.

SHEVTSOVA: I have a freedom to talk to you, and we can discuss Putin's leadership, and I'm not going to be in prison for that. I have freedom to travel across Russia, and I have freedom to emigrate if I chose to. I have freedom to read Internet, and I have freedom to discuss Putin and complain on the streets with my friends.

SHUSTER: But the mass media are not free in Russia, and people like Shevtsova and Piontkovsky are banned from appearing on television. The government's control of television is near absolute. The long list of complaints about Putin rarely reaches a mass audience. Those complaints include charges of widespread corruption, abuses by the police and the judiciary, and ballot rigging. It is no longer the old Soviet Union to be sure, but Putin's Russia is not yet a fully fledged democracy either. Tomorrow, with Putin once again president, more and more Russians are willing to take to the streets to say so. Mike Shuster, NPR News, Moscow. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.