Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Donald Trump picked a military town — Virginia Beach, Va. — to give a speech Monday on how he would go about overhauling the Department of Veterans Affairs if elected.

He blamed the Obama administration for a string of scandals at the VA during the past two years, and claimed that his rival, Hillary Clinton, has downplayed the problems and won't fix them.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Pulitzer Prizes Coming Up

Apr 16, 2012
(The awards were announced just after 3 p.m. ET.)

For its "distinguished ... reporting on significant issues of local concern," reporter Sara Ganim and The Patriot News of Harrisburg, Pa., have won a 2012 Pulitzer Prize for uncovering the so-called Penn State scandal.

Other prize winners, which were just announced, include:

-- The Tuscaloosa News for its coverage of the tornado that devastated the city last spring.

-- The Philadelphia Inquirer for its investigative reporting on violence in that city's schools.

-- The Seattle Times (for reporting about a government program that "moved vulnerable patients from safer pain-control medication to methadone, a cheaper but more dangerous drug") and the Associated Press (its "spotlighting of the New York Police Department's clandestine spying program that monitored daily life in Muslim communities") for investigative reporting.

-- David Wood of The Huffington Post for his national reporting on the physical and emotional challenges faced by veterans of the Iraq and Afghan wars.

-- Jeffrey Gettleman of The New York Times for his international reporting from conflict zones in East Africa.

We'll add more in a moment.

Update at 3:25 p.m. ET. More Winners:

-- Explanatory Reporting: David Kocieniewski of The New York Times "for his lucid series that penetrated a legal thicket to explain how the nation's wealthiest citizens and corporations often exploited loopholes and avoided taxes."

-- Feature Writing: Eli Sanders of The Stranger, a Seattle (Wash.) weekly, "for his haunting story of a woman who survived a brutal attack that took the life of her partner."

-- Commentary: Mary Schmich of the Chicago Tribune.

-- Editorial cartooning: Matt Wuerker of Politico.

-- Breaking news photography: Massoud Hossaini of Agence France-Presse "for his heartbreaking image of a girl crying in fear after a suicide bomber's attack at a crowded shrine in Kabul."

-- Feature photography: Craig F. Walker of The Denver Post, "for his compassionate chronicle of an honorably discharged veteran."

-- Drama: Water by the Spoonful, by Quiara Alegría Hudes

-- History: Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention, by the late Manning Marable (Viking)

-- Biography: George F. Kennan: An American Life, by John Lewis Gaddis (The Penguin Press)

-- Poetry: Life on Mars by Tracy K. Smith (Graywolf Press)

-- General Nonfiction: The Swerve: How the World Became Modern, by Stephen Greenblatt (W.W. Norton and Company)

-- Music: Silent Night: Opera in Two Acts by Kevin Puts (Aperto Press)

No awards were made in the categories of editorial writing or fiction.

Our original post:

This year's Pulitzer Prizes are due to be announced at 3 p.m. ET.

We won't make the understandable mistake of The Daily Beast, which appears to have hit the publish button on its "draft" of the news a bit early — it lists the "Times" as winning every category.

But if you are wondering about the leading candidates for this year's awards, Poynter's Roy Harris rounds them up here.

We'll update this post with the news after the prizes are announced. The Pulitzer website is here.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.