Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Donald Trump picked a military town — Virginia Beach, Va. — to give a speech Monday on how he would go about overhauling the Department of Veterans Affairs if elected.

He blamed the Obama administration for a string of scandals at the VA during the past two years, and claimed that his rival, Hillary Clinton, has downplayed the problems and won't fix them.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Protecting Your Privacy Amid Google Policy Changes

Feb 29, 2012

Many Google users are nervous about the tech giant's changes to its privacy policy, set to take effect on Thursday.

Google has already been collecting bits of personal information from its various services, but soon it will combine it all to produce more targeted ads.

So let's say you are signed into Gmail and you decide to watch a video on YouTube. And then you also check out your friend's vacation photos on Picasa. Well, Google will now combine all of that data to create a single, fuller portrait of you for advertisers.

The change is causing a stir online and around the world. In the U.S., the National Association of Attorneys General expressed "strong concerns" in a letter to Google CEO Larry Page. It reads in part, "The new policy forces these consumers to allow information across all of these products to be shared, without giving them the proper ability to opt out."

The European Union declared it would investigate whether the new policy violates European law, and urged Google to postpone the changes. Google responded that it believed the policy complied with the law, and the company would still go forward on March 1.

Cecilia Kang, national technology reporter for The Washington Post, tells host Michel Martin that the uproar isn't enough to make Google reconsider. "For Google, this is a business decision," she says.

So for those who are concerned, here are some measures you can take to boost your web privacy:

1. Act anonymously. You don't have to log in to watch YouTube or do a Google search.

2. Erase your search history. The Electronic Frontier Foundation offers a step-by-step guide. February 29 is the last day to do this.

3. Adjust your ad preferences. You can edit the categories of ads that Google sends you, or download a browser plug in that disables the DoubleClick cookie, which is Google's advertising cookie.

4. Use a different search engine, like DuckDuckGo or Yahoo!, if you are logged into Google.

5. Select stricter browser settings. Use private modes. Mozilla Firefox users can go to their settings, click on the "Privacy" tab, and check off the box "Tell Websites I Don't Want To Be Tracked."

6. Terminate your Google account. But before you do so, the Data Liberation Front can help you export all your personal information.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.