Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Donald Trump picked a military town — Virginia Beach, Va. — to give a speech Monday on how he would go about overhauling the Department of Veterans Affairs if elected.

He blamed the Obama administration for a string of scandals at the VA during the past two years, and claimed that his rival, Hillary Clinton, has downplayed the problems and won't fix them.

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Pages

Prison Meal Deal: Where The Staff Serves Lunch ... And Time

Feb 3, 2012
Originally published on May 23, 2012 11:04 am

The Fife and Drum Restaurant offers a daily lunch bargain that sounds hard to pass up: For just $3.21, you get a hot, tasty meal, made mostly from scratch and delivered to your table by friendly waiters.

So what's the catch? You have to go through security before you're served.

The restaurant is inside the Northeastern Correctional Center, a minimum-security prison on the outskirts of historic Concord, Mass. The place has a school-cafeteria feel, with linoleum floors and card tables under bright blue, plastic tablecloths. And the chefs and wait staff? They're inmates.

Bob Hertz started going there for lunch a few times a week some 20 years ago — back when it cost $1.42. "It's been a fantastic price, and the food's good," Hertz says.

Not surprisingly, "some people are a little nervous about the environment," he notes. "We had a group of women come from an insurance company, and as they walked in, there was a frisk going on. And we ... never saw them again."

The restaurant provides culinary training for the inmates, who rotate jobs every five weeks. On the day of my visit, the head chef was Calvin Hodge, who is halfway through a six-year sentence. He and his fellow students are in the kitchen at 7 a.m., prepping the day's meal: roast turkey with all the fixings — mashed potatoes, stuffing, vegetables, green beans and cranberry sauce.

"It gives you that experience of working in a real restaurant," Hodge says. "So when I do go home, I can say I got X amount of time of real experience — hands-on everything, feeding to the public, and I can cook pretty good. So, I should be able to get a position somewhere."

Prison officials say the goal is to help inmates gain real skills they can use to find work when they're released, because that reduces the risk that they'll re-offend.

The culinary program spends about $500 a week on food, offset by what customers pay. And there are a lot of regulars, including Mark Higgins.

"It's definitely different, being here for lunch, but I enjoy it very much," Higgins says. "Of course, we don't want to say how really good it is because the secret will be out."

Instructor Kim Luketich taught at a regular culinary school before coming to the Fife and Drum. Running a cooking program in prison, she says, poses unique challenges — for one thing, the knives are tethered to the tables or locked in cabinets. And her students have to learn a lot of skills on the job beyond chopping and plating.

"They get to kind of get acclimated to talking to people again, associating with people again," she says. "You know, it takes some getting used to for anybody — customer service. But, yeah, these guys are really doing a nice job."

Mark Molina is a first-time offender serving a three-year sentence. This month, he's waiting tables and baking desserts. "This baking stuff is like a chemistry," he says. "You've got to get everything just right. You screw up one thing, it comes out like a brick, rather than a cake."

Molina says the hours go by quickly, and he's grateful for that. His favorite part of the day is when he and his classmates get to sit down and taste what they've made.

As for Molina's baking skills, his chocolate cream pie gets an A-plus.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Lots of culinary schools around the country have restaurants that serve meals to the public.

But Shannon Mullen reports on one program in New England where the students aren't just chefs-in-training, they're also inmates.

(SOUNDBITE OF DISHES)

SHANNON MULLEN, BYLINE: The Fife and Drum Restaurant is on the outskirts of historic Concord, Massachusetts. It has a school cafeteria feel with linoleum floors and card tables under bright blue plastic tablecloths, and it serves only lunch. But a hot meal made mostly from scratch costs just $3.21.

BOB HERTZ: When I first started coming here, it was a $1.42.

MULLEN: Bob Hertz has been having lunch here a few times a week for 20 years.

HERTZ: It's been a fantastic price, and the food's good. Some people are a little nervous about the environment. We had a group of women come from an insurance company. As they walked in, there was a frisk going on. And we saw them once, never saw them again. So it depends on the person.

MULLEN: To get a table at the Fife and Drum, first you have to go through security. The restaurant is inside the Northeast Correctional Center, a minimum-security prison.

CALVIN HODGE: Gravy looks all set. 11:15, so 15 minutes till show time.

MULLEN: Calvin Hodge is halfway through a six-year sentence. He and his fellow students have been in the kitchen since 7 a.m. prepping today's meal.

HODGE: Mashed potatoes, stuffing, vegetables, green beans and cranberry sauce and gravy on top.

MULLEN: Today, Hodge is head chef, but the inmates rotate jobs every five weeks.

HODGE: It gives you that experience of working in a real restaurant. So when I do go home, I can say I got X-amount of time of real experience; hands on everything, feeding to the public. And I can cook pretty good. So I should be able to get a position somewhere.

MULLEN: Prison officials say their vocational education programs give inmates real skills that they can use to find work when they're released, and that reduces the risk that they'll reoffend. The culinary program spends about $500 a week on food, offset by what customers pay. And the restaurant has a lot of regulars, including Mark Higgins.

MARK HIGGINS: It's definitely different to being here for lunch, but I enjoy it very much.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

HIGGINS: Of course, we don't want to say how really good it is because the secret will be out.

(SOUNDBITE OF MACHINERY)

HODGE: Well, right now, I'm just serving the turkey.

MULLEN: Calvin, you might have to go like...

HODGE: A little slice.

KIM LUKETICH: ...slice and then a little piece, do you know what I mean?

MULLEN: The inmates' instructor, Kim Luketich, came here from a regular culinary school, and she says there are some unique challenges to running one in a prison. For one thing, the knives are tethered to the tables or locked in cabinets. The inmates have to learn a lot of skills on the job, in addition to waiting tables.

LUKETICH: They get to kind of get acclimated to talking to people again, associating with people again. You know, it takes a little getting used to for anybody, customer service. But, yeah, these guys are really doing a nice job.

MARK MOLINA: Nice to see you again. How are we doing? Thanks for coming in today. What can I get you?

MULLEN: Mark Molina is a first-time non-violent offender serving a three-year sentence. This month, he's waiting tables and baking desserts.

MOLINA: This baking stuff is like chemistry. You've got to get everything just right. You know, if you screw up one thing, it's - it comes out like a brick rather than a cake, you know? So...

MULLEN: But Molina says the hours go by quickly and he's grateful for that. His favorite part of the day is when he and his classmates get to sit down and try what they've made.

MOLINA: Oh man, great. Calvin, you outdid yourself buddy. You did great.

HODGE: Came out good.

MULLEN: As for Molina's baking skills, his chocolate cream pie gets an A-plus.

For NPR News, I'm Shannon Mullen. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.