4:46am

Thu December 19, 2013
National Security

Presidential Review Panel Endorses Checks On NSA

Originally published on Thu December 19, 2013 12:08 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

President Obama's intelligence review panel has produced a report that is hundreds of pages long. The advisors have a list of recommendations for how to protect privacy while still trying to prevent terrorist attacks. As NPR's Ari Shapiro reports, some of these are recommendations that the Obama White House has long resisted.

ARI SHAPIRO, BYLINE: President Obama appointed this review board after leaker Eric Snowden revealed massive American surveillance programs that had been top secret. Now the panel is endorsing a series of checks on the National Security Agency. While many of the ideas are not new, they carry more weight with the stamp of this panel. White House spokesman Jay Carney says that does not mean the president will accept all these suggestions.

JAY CARNEY: We will be reviewing the review group's report and its 46 recommendations as we consider the path forward, including sorting through which recommendations we will implement, which might require further study, and which we will choose not to pursue.

SHAPIRO: The president has defended the government's ability to acquire and store huge amounts of phone and email data, but this panel says a third party or private company should hold the raw data instead, forcing the government to request the specific information it needs. The report lists many steps to make NSA operations more transparent. And it suggests placing a privacy advocate in the secret court that authorizes NSA surveillance. The White House says President Obama will reveal his plans to the American people in a speech late next month. Ari Shapiro, NPR News, Washington. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.