Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Donald Trump picked a military town — Virginia Beach, Va. — to give a speech Monday on how he would go about overhauling the Department of Veterans Affairs if elected.

He blamed the Obama administration for a string of scandals at the VA during the past two years, and claimed that his rival, Hillary Clinton, has downplayed the problems and won't fix them.

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Pope Encounters A 'Wounded, Depressed' Mexico

Mar 24, 2012
Originally published on March 24, 2012 9:49 pm

Crowds of people dressed in white and waving yellow flags lined the highway outside the Leon airport in the central Mexican state of Guanajuato to welcome Pope Benedict XVI. They cheered wildly when the grinning, 84-year-old pontiff sped past in his glass-sided popemobile.

The pope began his weeklong trip to Latin America on Friday afternoon. He's spending the weekend in Mexico before heading to Cuba.

The throngs of well-wishers stretched for miles along the highway from the airport into the center of Leon. Huge billboards welcomed the pontiff here, but the response elsewhere in Mexico to Benedict's trip has been lukewarm, given the current violence and political climate.

Annabel Rizo and her sister had been standing in the intense late afternoon sun Friday in hopes of catching a glimpse of the pope.

"We were very close," she says. "We could see his face, his eyes."

Her sister Olga says she believes Benedict was sent here at this moment in time by God. "Mexico has so many problems right now," she says.

She hopes the pope's visit will help Catholics come together and improve the country.

"For everything — for all the problems we have," she says, "the poverty, the drug violence, the political problems. Everything."

Benedict comes during a presidential campaign and amidst a brutal drug war that has terrified and desensitized much of the country.

Bernardo Barranco, a scholar with the Center for Religious Studies in Mexico City, says Benedict's predecessor, Pope John Paul II, was extremely popular in Mexico.

"In 1979, there was a very glamorous, very spectacular encounter between Pope John Paul II and Mexico," he says.

During Paul's first two trips to Mexico in 1979 and 1990, Barranco says, an estimated 25 million people flocked to see him.

Mexico remains one of the most Catholic countries in the world. In the 2010 census, 83 percent of Mexicans identified themselves as Catholic.

Organizers of the trip are expecting up to 300,000 people to attend an open-air Mass by Benedict on Sunday.

But Barranco says Benedict hasn't captured the public's imagination the way Paul did.

"Pope Benedict XVI comes during a very different time. With a country wounded, depressed by the prolonged violence," Barranco says, "a country that doesn't have a clear vision of its own future."

Speaking with reporters on his flight from Rome to Mexico, Benedict denounced the drug violence that's claimed almost 50,000 lives here over the last five years.

This is expected to be one of the leading themes of his visit to Mexico. He's also expected to call for a return to traditional Catholic values.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. Pope Benedict XVI is in Mexico today as he begins a weeklong trip to Latin America. The pontiff arrived yesterday afternoon in the central Mexican state of Guanajuato. He's spending the weekend in Mexico before heading to Cuba. NPR's Jason Beaubien reports from Guanajuato.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHEERING)

JASON BEAUBIEN, BYLINE: Crowds of people dressed in white and waving yellow flags lined the highway outside the Leon Airport to welcome Pope Benedict XVI. And they cheered wildly when the grinning, 84-year-old pontiff sped past in his glass-sided popemobile.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHEERING)

BEAUBIEN: Annabel Rizo and her sister had been standing in the intense late afternoon sun in hopes of catching a glimpse of the Pope.

ANNABEL RIZO: (Spanish spoken)

BEAUBIEN: We were very close, she gushes, we could see his face, his eyes. Her sister Olga says she believes Pope Benedict was sent here at this moment in time by God. Mexico has so many problems right now, she says, she hopes the Pope's visit will help Catholics come together and improve the country.

OLGA RIZO: (Spanish spoken)

BEAUBIEN: For everything, for all the problems we have, she says, the poverty, the drug violence, the political problems - everything. The throngs of well-wishers stretched for miles along the highway from the airport into the center of Leon. Huge billboards welcomed the pontiff here but the response elsewhere in Mexico to Pope Benedict's trip has been lukewarm. He comes amidst a presidential campaign and a brutal drug war that's terrified and desensitized much of the country. Bernardo Barranco, a scholar with the Center for Religious Studies in Mexico City, says Benedict's first trip to Mexico comes in the wake of the extremely popular Pope John Paul II.

BERNARDO BARRANCO: (Spanish spoken)

BEAUBIEN: In 1979, Barranco says, there was a very glamorous, very spectacular encounter between Pope John Paul II and Mexico. During John Paul's first two trips to Mexico in 1979 and 1990, Barranco says an estimated 25 Million people flocked to see the pontiff. Mexico remains one of the most Catholic countries in the world. In the 2010 census, 83 percent of Mexicans identified themselves as Catholic. Organizers of this trip are expecting up to 300,000 people to attend an open-air mass by Pope Benedict tomorrow. But Barranco says Benedict hasn't captured the public's imagination the way John Paul did.

BARRANCO: (Spanish spoken)

BEAUBIEN: Pope Benedict XVI comes during a very different time, Barranco says, with a country wounded and depressed by the prolonged drug war, a country that doesn't have a clear vision of its own future. On his flight from Rome to Mexico, speaking with reporters, Pope Benedict denounced the drug violence that's claimed almost 50,000 lives here over the last five years. This is expected to be one of the leading themes of his visit to Mexico. He's also expected to call for a return to traditional Catholic values. Jason Beaubien, NPR News, Guanajuato, Mexico. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.