Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to arbitration at the Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Donald Trump picked a military town, Virginia Beach, Va., to give a speech Tuesday on how he would go about reforming the Department of Veterans Affairs if elected.

He blamed the Obama administration for a string of scandals at the VA during the past two years, and claimed that his rival, Hillary Clinton, has downplayed the problems and won't fix them.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The season for blueberries used to be short. You'd find fresh berries in the store just during a couple of months in the middle of summer.

Now, though, it's always blueberry season somewhere. Blueberry production is booming. The berries are grown in Florida, North Carolina, New Jersey, Michigan and the Pacific Northwest — not to mention the southern hemisphere.

But in any one location, the season is still short. And this means that workers follow the blueberry harvest, never staying in one place for long.

Pages

Parenting Advice For The 20-Something Years

Nov 22, 2011
Originally published on November 22, 2011 5:53 pm

From pregnancy on, parents often keep a stack of bedside reading full of advice on raising children — survival tips from the terrible toddler years through annoying adolescence. Los Angeles comedy writer Gail Parent figured she'd be done with all that once her kids turned the magical age of 21.

"Because I didn't tell my parents anything bad or negative," she says. "I let them be very peaceful about me when I was an adult. But I had told my kids to tell me everything when they were young."

And so they did — and kept doing it even after leaving home. At that point, Parent was no longer sure how to respond. Now that they were adults, where was the line between friendly advice and unwanted intrusion? There was no manual on parenting for the 20-something years, so in what appears to be part of a budding trend, Parent decided to create one. Her co-author, Pasadena, Calif., psychotherapist Susan Ende, says all their peers were grappling with the same thing.

"All I had to do was say, 'I'm writing a book called How to Raise Your Adult Children,' and somebody would say, 'I've got a problem,' " Ende says.

The hottest topics? Money — and kids moving back home. That trend was well under way even before the recession, which has since forced record numbers of job-seeking and penny-pinching college grads back to their parents' nest. Deserved or not, such "boomerang kids" have acquired a reputation as lazy slackers.

"When we first started this book, we thought it was all the kids' problem," says Parent.

But Parent says she soon discovered a lot of baby boomer parents are quite the enablers. She heard stories of them accompanying their kids to college class registration and negotiating grades with professors.

"I heard a parent saying on her cell phone, 'No, your father is not going to write your term paper for you!' "

Parent admits to some micromanaging herself, but says it's no wonder kids today can't make decisions on their own. And no wonder they feel entitled to move back home, rent free. Ende says parents may be happy to help, especially in this down economy.

"But parents have a difficult time setting time limits," she says. "Saying, 'You have to obey my rules because it's my house.' And, 'My money is my money, and you don't get to decide that I'm supposed to give it to you.' "

Others take a more sympathetic view.

"Should we just cast them loose at age 18 or 22 and say, 'You're on your own, and we're not going to help you anymore?' " asks Jeffrey Jensen Arnett of Clark University. Arnett is an expert on delayed adulthood, and his own parenting book on 20-somethings is due out next year. He says social norms are changing, and the 20s are a tough decade for both generations.

"A lot of parents say, 'Gosh, when I was 23 ...' " and note that they were already set on their career path and even had children, Arnett says. "They look at their children, and they see them nowhere near that, and they feel like their children are not making it. But that's not true."

Arnett says young adults today typically change jobs seven times before age 30 — yes, often quitting ones their parents find perfectly good. And with the average age of marriage continuing to rise, a life partner may still be nowhere in sight.

"There's a great deal of comfort for parents just in learning that that today is perfectly normal," he says. "Thirty really is the new 20."

The message for parents in both of these books: It's OK to let go."You won't lose your child," Ende says. "You'll just get a better version of them."

A true adult.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel. And we're going to spend the rest of this hour talking about parenting and the parenting industry. In a moment, we'll hear about parenting classes for grandparents, but first, a little reading material.

From pregnancy on, new parents often keep a stack of books at the bedside full of advice on raising young children. Now, the bad economy is pushing record numbers of young adults back home and, as NPR's Jennifer Ludden reports, that has kicked off a new trend: books about how to parent a 20-something.

JENNIFER LUDDEN, BYLINE: Just when you thought you were done, Los Angeles comedy writer, Gail Parent - yes, that's her name - figured, once her kids turned the magical age of 21, parenting was over.

GAIL PARENT: Because I didn't tell my parents anything bad or negative and I let them be very peaceful about me when I was an adult, but I had told my kids to tell me everything when they were young.

LUDDEN: And they kept doing it, even after leaving home, except Parent wasn't sure what to say back. Now that they were adults, where was the line between friendly advice and unwanted intrusion? There was no manual for this, so Parent decided to create one. Her co-author is Pasadena psychotherapist, Susan Ende, who says all of their peers were grappling with the same thing.

SUSAN ENDE: All I had to do was say, I'm writing a book called "How to Raise Your Adult Children," and somebody would say, I've got a problem.

LUDDEN: The hottest topics? Money and kids moving back home. The frustrations of that arrangement have become part of pop culture. In the movie, "Failure to Launch," one couple is so desperate, they hire Sarah Jessica Parker to push their son toward independence.

(SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE, "FAILURE TO LAUNCH")

SARAH JESSICA PARKER: (as Paula) I can have your son moved out of this house by June 15th.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Hallelujah.

PARENT: When we first started this book, we thought it was all the kids' problem.

LUDDEN: You know, says Gail Parent, lazy slackers who don't want to grow up. But she soon discovered a lot of boomer parents are - shall we say - enablers, accompanying their kids to college class registration, negotiating grades with professors.

PARENT: Oh, I heard a parent saying on her cell phone, no, your father is not going to write your term paper for you.

LUDDEN: She says no wonder kids today can't make decisions for themselves and no wonder they feel entitled to move back home rent-free. Ende says parents may be happy to help, especially in this down economy.

ENDE: But parents have a difficult time setting time limits, saying, you have to obey my rules because it's my house. and my money is my money and you don't get to decide that I am supposed to give it to you.

JEFFREY JENSEN ARNETT: Should we just cast them loose at age 18 or 22 and say, you're on your own and we're not going to help you anymore?

LUDDEN: Jeffrey Jensen Arnett of Clark University is an expert on this delayed adulthood. His parenting book is due out next year. Arnett does not blame so-called helicopter parents for hovering too intimately. He says social norms are changing and the 20s are a tough decade for both generations.

ARNETT: You know, a lot of parents say, gosh, when I was 23 - and they look at their children and they see them nowhere near that and they feel like their children are not making it, but that's not true.

LUDDEN: Arnett says young adults today typically change jobs seven times before age 30. Yes, often quitting jobs their parents find perfectly good. And a life partner may be nowhere in sight just yet.

ARNETT: There's a great deal of comfort for parents just in learning that that, today, is perfectly normal. Thirty really is the new 20.

LUDDEN: So I'm imagining, back in the years when I was reading all the toddler books and I would turn to my husband and say, it's okay, honey, it's developmentally appropriate.

ARNETT: Exactly.

LUDDEN: The message for parents in both these books: it's okay to let go. You won't lose your child, says Susan Ende. You'll just get a better version of them, a true adult.

Jennifer Ludden, NPR News. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.