"O Canada," the national anthem of our neighbors up north, comes in two official versions — English and French. They share a melody, but differ in meaning.

Let the record show: neither version of those lyrics contains the phrase "all lives matter."

But at the 2016 All-Star Game, the song got an unexpected edit.

At Petco Park in San Diego, one member of the Canadian singing group The Tenors — by himself, according to the other members of the group — revised the anthem.

School's out, and a lot of parents are getting through the long summer days with extra helpings of digital devices.

How should we feel about that?

Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she disparaged him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb political statements" about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Pages

'Like Our Own Mother': Aung San Suu Kyi In Thailand

Jun 3, 2012
Originally published on June 3, 2012 7:36 pm

On her first journey abroad in 24 years, Myanmar's opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi upstaged and dazzled world leaders with her statesmanship and charisma.

Suu Kyi attended an international economic forum in Thailand last week, but Saturday was very different. She visited a camp on the Thai-Myanmar border, where refugees have fled to escape oppression and civil war in her homeland. The visit showed that despite becoming one of the most prominent politicians in Asia, her political situation at home remains a bit precarious.

Suu Kyi chose to visit Mae La, the largest of nine camps housing mostly ethnic Karen refugees. Unable to work legally in Thailand or return home to Myanmar — also known as Burma — the camp's roughly 50,000 refugees live in a stateless limbo, dwelling in thatched bamboo huts in the jungle, surviving with help from international aid groups.

"The Burmese military regime denies that we refugees even exist," complained U Htwe, a refugee wearing a cone-shaped bamboo hat and carrying the flag of Suu Kyi's party, the National League for Democracy. "Our life here is very difficult, and Suu Kyi comes here to visit us just like our own mother. We're very happy to see her and we warmly welcome her."

A Media Spotlight On A Sensitive Subject

Suu Kyi's arrival unleashed a ferocious scrum of jostling journalists, police and supporters, just they way it does in Myanmar.

The refugees are perhaps the thorniest issue in the diplomatic relationship between the two neighbors, Thailand and Myanmar. While Thailand has taken in refugees for decades, some politicians and military officials would like to see the camps shut down and their inhabitants repatriated by any means necessary.

Thai authorities canceled Suu Kyi's planned speech to the refugees, and meetings with ethnic Karen leaders, and expelled some journalists who had snuck into the camp.

Experts warn that just as Myanmar's military could roll back the current political reforms, they could also take away Suu Kyi's political space to maneuver. Trevor Wilson, a former Australian ambassador to Myanmar, says that Suu Kyi, on her trip to Thailand as well as to Europe later this month, has to avoid any missteps that could get her in trouble at home.

"She doesn't want to get a situation where the freedoms that she now has are withdrawn," he says. "I mean, I'm not suggesting she won't be allowed to go back, but there may be some kind of restrictions imposed on the kinds of meetings she has with people."

Time To Go Back? Not Yet

The reforms may be tentative and fragile, but they have raised the prospect that one day, one of the world's longest-suffering groups of refugees may eventually go home.

Some refugees say they're waiting for more substantial political reforms, such as amending the constitution to protect their human rights, before they return. They point out that President Thein Sein has urged Burmese overseas to return home, but they point out that his words fall far short of an actual government policy.

Some nonprofit groups also are hopeful.

Michael Albert, the Thailand-based country manager for Right to Play, an aid group that provides refugee youth with sports and recreation, says civic groups are now shifting their strategies away from integrating the refugees into Thai society toward "preparing refugees for the eventuality of returning to Myanmar."

"This is something that has not really been possible in past," Albert says, "so in that sense it is quite an exciting time. The main issue that still remains is: at what time will that be? And everyone agrees it is not right now."

After Years Of Fighting, Thoughts Of A New Home

For now, fighting still rages in Myanmar's northern Kachin state between ethnic rebels seeking autonomy and government troops. In the east, a tenuous cease-fire is in effect with ethnic Karen rebels.

Saw David Tharkapaw, vice chairman of the Karen National Union, is one of the ethnic leaders whom Suu Kyi was barred from meeting. He says that instead of withdrawing, the Burmese army has used the cease-fire to stock up and dig in.

"We stopped shooting before we talk about the terms and conditions to govern the cease-fire," he says. "So this dry season they freely resupply their troops and they are improving their bunkers with reinforced concrete."

Even if the fighting stops, a generation of refugees has grown up in the camps with no ties to Myanmar. Many of them dream of emigrating to a third country.

There also are many like Nan Le'le, who fled here from the neighboring Karen State.

"I have no home to go back to," she explains. "The government confiscated our ancestral lands. Then they gave people new land elsewhere, but we had no documents proving we owned our home, so we had no way to claim a new home from the government. We were living in a rice field, and life was very difficult."

Asked where she wants to live, she holds up her young daughter and replies: Anywhere she can get a decent education.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Myanmar's opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi has made her debut on the international stage after being released from house arrest. On her first journey abroad in 24 years, Suu Kyi attended an international economic forum in Thailand, dazzling world leaders with her statesmanship and charisma. Then yesterday, she visited a camp on the Thai-Myanmar border where refugees have fled to escape oppression and civil war in her homeland. But as NPR's Anthony Kuhn reports, the visit to the camp showed that despite becoming one of the most prominent politicians in Asia, her political situation at home remains precarious.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

ANTHONY KUHN, BYLINE: Ethnic Karen musicians warm up for Aung San Suu Kyi's arrival at the Mae La refugee camp. Unable to work legally in Thailand or return home to Myanmar - also known as Burma - the camp's roughly 50,000 refugees live in a stateless limbo, dwelling in thatched bamboo huts in the jungle, and surviving with help from international aid groups. U Htwe, a refugee in a cone-shaped bamboo hat, wears the flag of the National League for Democracy, Suu Kyi's party.

U HTWE: (Foreign language spoken)

KUHN: The Burmese military regime denies that we refugees even exist, he complains. Our life here is very difficult, and Suu Kyi comes here to visit us just like our own mother. We're very happy to see her and we warmly welcome her.

(SOUNDBITE OF PEOPLE CHEERING)

KUHN: Suu Kyi's arrival unleashes a melee of jostling journalists, police and supporters, just the way it does in Myanmar. The refugees are perhaps the thorniest issue in the diplomatic relationship between the two neighbors, Thailand and Myanmar. Thai authorities canceled Suu Kyi's planned speech to the refugees, and meetings with ethnic Karen leaders. Experts warn that just as Myanmar's military could roll back the current political reforms, they could also take away Suu Kyi's political space to maneuver. Former Australian ambassador to Myanmar, Trevor Wilson, says that on her trip to Thailand as well as to Europe later this month, Suu Kyi has to avoid any missteps that could get her in trouble back home.

AMBASSADOR TREVOR WILSON: She doesn't want to get a situation where the freedoms that she now has are withdrawn. I mean, I'm not suggesting she won't be allowed to go back, but there may be some kind of restrictions imposed on the meetings that she has with people.

KUHN: The reforms may be fragile, but they have raised the prospect that one day, one of the world's longest-suffering groups of refugees may eventually go home. Michael Albert is the Thailand-based country manager for Right to Play, an aid group that provides refugee youth with sports and recreation. He says aid groups are now shifting their strategies away from integrating the refugees into Thai society...

MICHAEL ALBERT: To preparing refugees for the eventuality of returning to Myanmar. I mean, this is something that has not really been possible in past, so in that sense it is quite an exciting time. The main issue that still remains is at what time will that be? And everyone agrees it is not right now.

KUHN: For now, fighting still rages in Myanmar's northern Kachin state between ethnic rebels seeking autonomy and government troops. In the east, a tenuous cease-fire is in effect with ethnic Karen rebels. Saw David Tharkabaw is chairman of the Karen National Union. He says that instead of withdrawing, the Burmese army has used the cease-fire to stock up and dig in.

SAW DAVID THARKABAW: We stopped shooting and before we talk about the terms and conditions to govern the cease-fire. So, this dry season, they freely resupply their troops and they are improving their bunkers with reinforced concrete.

KUHN: Even if the fighting stops, a generation of refugees has grown up in the camps with no ties to Myanmar. Many of them dream of emigrating to a third country. Nan Le'le fled here from the neighboring Karen state.

NAN LE'LE: (Through Translator) I have no home to go back to. The government confiscated our ancestral lands, then they gave people new land elsewhere, but we had no documents proving we owned our home, so we had no way to claim a new home from the government. We were living in a rice field; life is very difficult.

KUHN: Asked where she wants to live, she holds up her young daughter and replies, anywhere she can get a decent education. Anthony Kuhn, NPR News, Mae Sot, Thailand. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.