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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to arbitration at the Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Donald Trump picked a military town — Virginia Beach, Va. — to give a speech Monday on how he would go about overhauling the Department of Veterans Affairs if elected.

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The season for blueberries used to be short. You'd find fresh berries in the store just during a couple of months in the middle of summer.

Now, though, it's always blueberry season somewhere. Blueberry production is booming. The berries are grown in Florida, North Carolina, New Jersey, Michigan and the Pacific Northwest — not to mention the southern hemisphere.

But in any one location, the season is still short. And this means that workers follow the blueberry harvest, never staying in one place for long.

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The Oscars Of Livestock In The Mile High City

Jan 18, 2012
Originally published on January 18, 2012 7:27 pm

The single largest cattle show in the United States, the National Western Stock Show, is now under way in Denver. Fans roar overhead, keeping the air cool and the odors at bay, as Jeanette Fuller spiffs up her Black Angus — with product.

"High-strength hairspray, basically, just trying to get the hair to accentuate the good things about her and kind of cover up the bad things about her," Fuller says.

The barn is like a dressing room backstage at the Oscars, except it is the country's premier Angus show. Fuller, who raises certified Angus beef near Twin Falls, Idaho, styles the tail meticulously. She then buffs up its coat so it shines.

"We want them to look their best," she says.

Almost everyone in the audience on the show floor is a prominent cattle breeder or buyer.

"This event ... has been going over a hundred years," John McCurry of Burton, Kan., says as he herds his senior heifer calf out of the arena.

McCurry is modest and matter-of-fact, what you would expect of a cowboy. But beneath the brim of his tan hat, a subtle smile forms as he clutches a big blue ribbon. Winning here at the Super Bowl for the cattle industry is prestigious, and great for business, participants say.

"This is the toughest show in the world, in terms of quality Angus cattle," McCurry says.

There are also sheep and goats pleading for their dinner here in the small livestock barn, and hogs, chickens, horse shows, rodeos and vendor stalls.

There's a lot of leather. And you can buy longhorns — your very own longhorn for $224.95.

There's even bull semen for sale.

"We are a semen sales business from Great Falls, Mont.," salesman Chase Murray says.

It's actually a lucrative market, according to Murray. "You don't have to spend a whole bunch of money to get one of these good bulls," he says. "You can just breed, buy some semen, to get better replacement heifers."

The bull semen and cattle business in general is booming right now. So Reece Aglin didn't think twice about gassing up his truck and trailer to drive the 700 miles from his ranch in Circle, Mont.

Outside, in the sunny stockyards, he's tending to his prized purebred shorthorn. "He's probably around 1,800 pounds," Aglin says. "He's just a pretty outstanding show bull; he's got lots of power, lots of hip, good thick muscle — overall a pretty amazing bull."

Unlike the smaller cows inside, this shorthorn won't be competing. Aglin is just here to show him off and network through next Sunday, the end of the show.

Copyright 2013 KUNC-FM. To see more, visit http://www.kunc.org.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

This month, we've reported on Detroit's Auto Show, the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, and now in Denver, the single largest cattle show in the U.S.

From member station KUNC, Kirk Siegler reports from the National Western Stock Show now underway in the Mile High City.

KIRK SIEGLER, BYLINE: Fans roar overhead keeping the air cool and the odors at bay, as Jeanette Fuller spiffs-up her Black Angus with product.

JEANETTE FULLER: High-strength hairspray, basically, just trying to get the hair to accentuate the good things about her and kind of cover up the bad things about her.

SIEGLER: Think of this barn like a dressing room backstage at the Oscars, except it is the country's premier Angus show. Fuller, who raises certified Angus beef near Twin Falls, Idaho, styles the tail meticulously. I spend less time on my faux-hawk. She then buffs up its coat so it shines.

FULLER: And so, we want them to look their best.

SIEGLER: After all, pretty much everyone in audience out on the show floor is a prominent cattle breeder or buyer.

John McCurry of Burton, Kansa, herds his senior heifer calf out of the arena.

JOHN MCCURRY: This event, the history, I mean that, you know, this show has been going over a hundred years and just the nostalgia...

SIEGLER: McCurry is modest and matter-of-fact, what you would expect of a cowboy. But beneath the brim of his tan hat, a subtle smile forms as he clutches a big blue ribbon. Winning here at the Super Bowl for the cattle industry is prestigious, and great for business.

MCCURRY: This is the toughest show in the world, in terms of quality Angus cattle.

SIEGLER: If cows aren't your thing, never fear.

(SOUNDBITE OF COWS)

SIEGLER: There are also sheep and goats pleading for their dinner here in the small livestock barn. There are also hogs and chickens, horse shows and rodeos. And this is America after all, so there's plenty to buy in row after row of vendor stalls.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #2: A lot of leather, I can smell the leather belts from here. A little bit further on here, you can buy longhorns - your very own longhorn for $224.95.

CHASE MURRAY: We are a semen sales business from Great Falls, Montana.

SIEGLER: You heard that right, there's even bull semen for sale. It's actually a lucrative market, according to salesman Chase Murray.

MURRAY: You don't have to spend a whole bunch of money to get one of these good bulls. You can just breed, you know, buy some semen breed to get better replacement heifers.

SIEGLER: The bull semen and cattle business in general is booming right now. So, Reece Aglin didn't think twice about gassing up his truck and trailer to drive the 700 miles from his ranch in Circle, Montana.

Outside, in the sunny stockyards, he's tending to his prized purebred shorthorn.

REECE AGLIN: Probably around 1,800 pounds.

SIEGLER: He's like literally the size of my car.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

AGLIN: Yeah. He's just a pretty outstanding show bull. He's got lots of power, lots of hip, good thick muscle - overall a pretty amazing bull.

SIEGLER: Now, unlike the smaller cows inside, this shorthorn won't be competing. Aglin is just here to show him off and network. The National Western Stock Show runs through Sunday.

For NPR News, I'm Kirk Siegler...

(SOUNDBITE OF COWS)

SIEGLER: ...in Denver. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.