Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Donald Trump picked a military town — Virginia Beach, Va. — to give a speech Monday on how he would go about overhauling the Department of Veterans Affairs if elected.

He blamed the Obama administration for a string of scandals at the VA during the past two years, and claimed that his rival, Hillary Clinton, has downplayed the problems and won't fix them.

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Once Again, Santorum Keeps It Close But Falls Further Behind

Apr 4, 2012
Originally published on April 4, 2012 1:50 pm

Rick Santorum came surprisingly close to an upset in Wisconsin this week, losing to Mitt Romney by less than 5 percentage points. It was not as heartbreakingly close as his previous losses in Michigan and Ohio, but it was one more reminder of what might have been.

With a win in Wisconsin, Santorum would have confounded the ruling media narrative of the moment, which wants to turn from the primary season of spring to the autumnal matchup of Romney and President Obama.

True, Santorum also lost this week by far more decisive margins in Maryland and the District of Columbia, which combined to give rival Romney about 50 new delegates. But Wisconsin had become the focal point of the day, offering the latest and perhaps last chance for Santorum and other Romney opponents to derail the Front-Runner Express and declare the nomination contest wide open.

To this end, Santorum worked the rural communities of the Badger State hard, wearing the farm gear and rolling the bowling balls and talking to the local papers. His crowds were not large but his target audience got the message. Despite a late rush of local endorsements for Romney, Santorum did not collapse. Defying polls, including an exit poll on primary day showing Romney ahead by 8 points, the final tally was much closer.

Yet once again, any chance Santorum had of capitalizing on his good showing was lost in his own mixed messaging. He left Wisconsin on primary day to retreat to Pennsylvania, and not to his own hometown but to a neighboring community named Mars. Correspondents could note they were reporting from Mars, offering one more chance to portray Santorum's unconventional campaign as anything but down to earth.

Meeting the crowd in Mars, Santorum played the firebrand once more, proclaiming his determination to stay in the race and turn things around. But like the speeches he made in Michigan and Ohio, this one was preoccupied with political purism — a theme that has yet to get Santorum over the top in populous states.

Media misses have become the norm for the Santorum insurgency. It is easy to forget that he virtually tied Romney for delegates in Romney's "home" state of Michigan in February, or that he lost by a single percentage point in crucial Ohio in March. But these were the inflection points that determined the nomination. Forget about everything else; it was the dual disappointments in Michigan and Ohio that kept the upstart from Pennsylvania from making his challenge to Romney stick.

You could hear an echo of those events this week as broadcasters and others called Wisconsin for Romney early and then sweated out late returns that shrank the gap. It was a great opportunity to upbraid the media as elements of the establishment, a tactic Newt Gingrich has used many times.

But once again, Santorum sacrificed any chance he had of spinning the Tuesday results in his favor by making what the media regard as loser moves. Once again, Santorum's sanctimonious presentation was neither a concession nor a claim of victory. As before, he seemed more concerned with the emotional resonance of his cause, auditioning more for the role of martyr than for that of national leader.

For that reason, Romney's trifecta of this week put the closing bracket on an eight-week interlude in which Santorum had been his main challenger. The eight weeks had begun with Santorum's own trifecta in Colorado, Minnesota and Missouri, which he won Feb. 7.

The difference was that in Santorum's trifecta Tuesday in February, he secured no delegates at all (the contests were not binding), whereas this week's trio of wins for Romney delivered roughly 80 delegates for him (and fewer than 20 for Santorum).

Romney already had more than twice as many delegates as Santorum, whether you count only the hardest of the hard-core committed or expand your count to include projections. That is why professionals look at the remaining events and say that neither Santorum nor anyone else can win often enough or win big enough to deny Romney's bid.

Still, the surprising Santorum and his trenchant appeal to voters in the "Republican parts" of Midwestern and Great Lakes states have been the story of the GOP nominating contest for the past eight weeks. And only now does Romney the front-runner feel sure enough of the nomination to train his fire exclusively on the president.

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