Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to arbitration at the Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Donald Trump picked a military town — Virginia Beach, Va. — to give a speech Monday on how he would go about overhauling the Department of Veterans Affairs if elected.

He blamed the Obama administration for a string of scandals at the VA during the past two years, and claimed that his rival, Hillary Clinton, has downplayed the problems and won't fix them.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The season for blueberries used to be short. You'd find fresh berries in the store just during a couple of months in the middle of summer.

Now, though, it's always blueberry season somewhere. Blueberry production is booming. The berries are grown in Florida, North Carolina, New Jersey, Michigan and the Pacific Northwest — not to mention the southern hemisphere.

But in any one location, the season is still short. And this means that workers follow the blueberry harvest, never staying in one place for long.

Pages

'Occupy' Activists Urge Like-Minded to Participate In, Not Disrupt, Iowa Caucuses

Dec 30, 2011

In a cavernous Des Moines meeting hall just west of the state Capitol, progressive activist and writer John Nichols had a simple message for those involved in Iowa's iteration of the Occupy Wall Street movement.

"Learn to get cool with losing," Nichols told about 50 people who had come to hear advice from longtime activists, including veterans of the civil rights battle.

"Get comfortable that you absolutely will be told you can't succeed," he said, and with the notion of a long-term struggle "that may last beyond your lifetime."

The struggle to keep the movement going, and activists engaged in work more incremental than immediate, is particularly acute right now in Iowa.

Here, the Occupy effort has had a focus for the past few months: the presidential caucuses, which are now just four days away.

The meeting hall (actually, a vast, vacant former bar/restaurant) where Nichols spoke Thursday night was recently rented by Occupy activists as a temporary staging area for their "Occupy the Caucuses" campaign.

The walls of the space are covered with giant hand-lettered signs, including those encouraging activists to "Vote Uncommitted" in the caucuses. Free food was being offered for those in need, and fliers promoted an "Occupy the Statehouse" event Jan. 10, when Gov. Terry Branstad is scheduled to deliver his State of the State address.

In recent days, Occupy activists have staged protests at campaign events and at presidential campaign headquarters in Iowa, including President Obama's. They also are urging those sympathetic to the movement to participate in the caucuses.

"We are adamantly not interested in disrupting the caucuses," Ed Fallon, a former Democratic state legislator and one-time gubernatorial candidate, told us earlier in the day during an interview at Tally's Restaurant in Beaver Valley. "It's important that we don't do that."

Fallon said that if he goes to a Democratic caucus, he would declare himself uncommitted to show his displeasure with Obama's positions on issues ranging from the continuing operation of the military prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, to the reauthorization of the Patriot Act.

But he is planning to register as a Republican on caucus night and, probably, cast his ballot for Texas Rep. Ron Paul.

"That is not an endorsement," Fallon said. "But a Ron Paul versus Obama debate? That's a good debate."

Fallon says the struggle to keep the Occupy effort going is a real one, but he views the movement as the "most encouraging thing I've seen in 30 years of activism."

There is a need for better structure, he says, for movement leaders, for the effort not to become defined by homeless people who tend to be the longest-term occupants of Occupy camps.

"The homeless are part of the movement, be we can't become a homeless movement," he said.

Fallon defends as necessary the movement's use of protest and occupation to get its message out.

"We are a poor movement, and we don't have a lot of political leadership standing with us," Fallon said. "We have our voices, our bodies, our minds and our numbers."

Back at the meeting hall, Nichols and the others grappled with the bottom-line issue of numbers.

"Create your own media," he said, and "make sure that you are not just talking to yourselves."

The real test for Iowa Occupy activists will come after Jan. 3, when the organizing imperative of a presidential contest is in their rearview mirror.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.