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At Petco Park in San Diego, one member of the Canadian singing group The Tenors — by himself, according to the other members of the group — revised the anthem.

School's out, and a lot of parents are getting through the long summer days with extra helpings of digital devices.

How should we feel about that?

Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Obama's Gay Marriage Stand May Not Sway Latinos

May 14, 2012
Originally published on May 14, 2012 7:49 pm

President Obama is attending a campaign fundraiser Monday night co-hosted by gay- and lesbian-rights leaders and a Latino nonprofit. The event is being headlined by singer Ricky Martin.

Obama maintains a commanding lead over likely GOP presidential nominee Mitt Romney when it comes to support among Latino voters. But those same voters are generally regarded as socially conservative, leading some to wonder how the president's support for same-sex marriage might affect the Latino electorate.

Roberto Ordenana, a 35-year-old native San Franciscan and LGBT activist, was on his way to work when he first got the news of the president's announcement. Days later, the memory of that moment makes Ordenana smile like he's won the lottery.

"When I heard about it, I was completely elated," he says. "I was taken by surprise, and immediately I just felt an incredible sense of pride."

Ordenana says he immediately called his parents, whom he describes as being like the president — in other words, their thinking has "evolved" from the days when he first came out at the age of 19.

"They have openly met my friends and accepted them into our family," Ordenana says. "At the same time, they go to church every Sunday morning. And so they're able to hold both their religious beliefs and also the knowledge that LGBT individuals should be treated equally."

No one would suggest that the acceptance Ordenana found with his family is universal in other Latino families or the community at large. But his story might challenge a commonly held assumption that goes like this: Latinos have socially conservative views on religion and family; therefore, Obama's statement won't play well with Latino voters.

"I will be very surprised if this lessens his support among Latino voters at all," says Luis Fraga, who teaches political science at the University of Washington.

Not High On The List

Fraga says there's no evidence that Latino voters favor traditional moral or social values over bread-and-butter issues.

"A very important issue for Latino voters is immigration," Fraga says. "The president has come out very strongly in favor of comprehensive immigration reform and the DREAM Act. That is a far more important issue to Latino voters, as are jobs and the economy, than are issues associated with same-sex marriage."

Still, opponents of gay marriage within the Latino community made it clear they weren't happy with the president's statement.

The Rev. Sam Rodriguez of the California-based National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference told Fox News Latino: "This is about the government saying, 'We are going to hijack a religious doctrine and change it for you.' "

From New York, the Rev. Gabriel Salguero of the National Latino Evangelical Coalition echoed that protest. "There is real concern about the church's freedom to define marriage within its own religious liberty issue ... and we're looking really closely [at] what the president's statements mean in terms of policy."

'Part Of Our Families'

Still, Salguero isn't prepared to call the president's statement a deal breaker for Hispanic evangelical voters.

Polls suggest that Latino views on same-sex marriage are aligned with American public opinion in general — a slight but growing majority supports marriage equality, and strong outright opposition is minimal.

"You know, there's a lot of gay people in the Latino community, LGBT people in the Latino community, and they are part of our families," says Antonio Gonzalez, president of the William C. Velasquez Institute, a public policy and research group based in Texas. "I think we're going through a self-education and sensitizing process just like everybody else."

And he says even if the president loses some Latino votes on this issue, he is likely to make up for it with a re-energized gay and lesbian base.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News.

This afternoon in New York City, President Obama arrived at a fundraiser co-hosted by a gay- and lesbian-rights group, a Latino nonprofit and pop star Ricky Martin. It's a notable gathering coming soon after the president said he supports same-sex marriage. Mr. Obama has a commanding lead over Mitt Romney among Latino voters, but those same voters are generally considered socially conservative.

NPR's Richard Gonzales reports on how the president's support for same-sex marriage might affect the Latino electorate.

RICHARD GONZALES, BYLINE: Thirty-five-year-old Roberto Ordenana is a native San Franciscan and LGBT activist who was on his way to work when he first got the news of the president's announcement.

ROBERTO ORDENANA: When I heard about it, you know, I was, you know, completely elated. I was taken by surprise, and immediately, I just felt an incredible sense of pride.

GONZALES: Ordenana says he immediately called his parents, who he describes as being like the president. In other words, their thinking has evolved from the days when he first came out at the age of 19.

ORDENANA: They have openly met my friends and accepted them into our family. And at the same time, they go to church every Sunday morning. And so they're able to hold both their, you know, religious beliefs and also the knowledge that LGBT individuals should be treated equally.

GONZALES: No one would suggest that the acceptance Ordenana found with his family is universal in other Latino families or the community at large. But his story might challenge a commonly held assumption that goes like this: Latinos have socially conservative views on religion and family; therefore, President Obama's statement won't play well with Latino voters.

DR. LUIS FRAGA: I will be very surprised if this lessens his support among Latino voters at all.

GONZALES: Luis Fraga teaches political science at the University of Washington. Fraga says there's no evidence that Latino voters favor traditional moral or social values over bread-and-butter issues.

FRAGA: A very important issue for Latino voters is immigration. The president has come out very strongly in favor of comprehensive immigration reform and the DREAM Act. That is a far more important issue to Latinos voters, as are jobs and the economy, than are issues associated with same-sex marriage.

GONZALES: Still, opponents of gay marriage within the Latino community made it clear they weren't happy with the president's statement. Reverend Sam Rodriguez of the California-based National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference told Fox News Latino: This is about the government saying we are going to hijack a religious doctrine and change it for you. From New York, Reverend Gabriel Salguero of the National Latino Evangelical Coalition echoed that protest.

REVEREND GABRIEL SALGUERO: There's real concern about the church's freedom to define marriage within its own religious liberty issue. I think - and we're looking really closely on what the president's statements mean in terms of policy.

GONZALES: Still, Salguero isn't prepared to call the president's statement a game breaker with Hispanic evangelical voters. Polls suggest that Latino views on same-sex marriage are aligned with American public opinion in general: A slight but growing majority supports marriage equality. Antonio Gonzalez is the president of the William C. Velasquez Institute, a public policy and research group based in Texas.

ANTONIO GONZALEZ: You know, there's a lot of gay people in the Latino community, LGBT people in the Latino community, and they're part of our families. And I think, you know, we're going through a self-education and sensitizing process just like everybody else.

GONZALES: And he says that even if the president loses some Latino votes on this issue, he'll likely make up for it with a re-energized gay and lesbian base. Richard Gonzales, NPR News, San Francisco. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.