Kanyes, Kims, and Donalds—oh my! Narcissism is all around us, and research shows it's on the rise. Millennials are more likely than their parents to claim they're above average in just about every way, from their leadership skills to their academic achievements to their drive to succeed. And while more millennials are getting straight A's and making plans for graduate school than previous generations, there's no evidence that they're actually any more productive or educated than their elders.

Tim Duncan, the long-time star of the San Antonio Spurs, announced today that he is retiring. He helped the team win five NBA titles since he joined the franchise in 1997.

Duncan's reserved personality kept him largely out of the spotlight, despite his consistently stellar performances with the Spurs, who made the playoffs every year that Duncan played for the team. Duncan was voted most valuable player five times, two of them regular-season M.V.P. awards and three others for his performances in NBA finals.

In an epidemic, health professionals often struggle to answer two basic questions: Who is sick and where are they?

There are innovative digital strategies to help answer these questions.

Researchers have investigated how a spike in Google searches (for example, "What is flu?") can help them determine if a disease is spreading and how many people might be affected in a given area.

President Obama on Monday called on Congress to revisit the controversial idea of providing a government-run insurance plan as part of the offerings under the Affordable Care Act.

What's been described as the "public option" was jettisoned from the health law in 2009 by a handful of conservative Democrats in the Senate. Every Democrat's vote was needed to pass the bill in the face of unanimous Republican opposition.

There are some big companies out there that you've probably never heard of, that know more about you than you can imagine.

They're called data brokers, and they collect all sorts of information — names, addresses, income, where you go on the Internet and who you connect with online. That information is then sold to other companies. There are few regulations governing these brokers.

Updated at 7:20 p.m. with details of the shootings

Two bailiffs were killed and a deputy sheriff was wounded in a shooting Monday afternoon at a courthouse in southwestern Michigan, according to Berrien County Sheriff L. Paul Bailey.

The gunman was shot and killed. The deputy sheriff is in stable condition. One civilian was also wounded.

According to Bailey, the shooting took place on the third floor of the courthouse in St. Joseph, about 40 miles from the border with Indiana.

At least 25 people have died in clashes between militants and the Indian Army in the Himalayan region of Kashmir since Friday, according to the Associated Press.

Most of those killed were protesters, who took to the streets after the death of Burhan Wani, the young and charismatic leader of the region's largest rebel militia, Hizbul Mujahideen. Wani was killed by Indian security forces in a shootout on Friday, according to the AP.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Is Obamacare A Success? We Might Not Know For A While

Apr 16, 2014
Originally published on April 16, 2014 4:33 pm

After months of focusing on how many people have or haven't signed up for health insurance under the Affordable Care Act, we now have a rough total (7.5 million), and everyone's keen to get to the bigger questions: How well is the law working? How many of those who signed up have paid their premiums and are actually getting coverage? How many were uninsured before they signed up? And just how big has the drop been in the number of uninsured people?

Unfortunately, the answers to some of these questions simply aren't knowable — or, at least, not knowable yet.

"It's very challenging," says Linda Blumberg, a senior fellow at the Urban Institute's Health Policy Center. "People want answers right away, and the best data sets we have obviously come out with a lag."

What's So Complicated?

That's partly because of the enormous size and complexity of the health system and the law. But it's also because the insurance industry is mostly private and regulated by the states.

"The impacts that all of these changes are going to have on the marketplace are going to play out differently all across the country," says Robert Zirkelbach, spokesman for the trade group America's Health Insurance Plans. "Simply looking at national data doesn't tell you what's going to happen in a particular market in a particular state."

Still, it's worth taking a closer look at some of those questions.

How Many Folks Are Paying Their Premiums?

First, how many people have actually paid their premiums for insurance they've chosen through the health exchange? That's the final and arguably most important part of the sign-up process. Most insurers report numbers in the 80 to 85 percent range. You might assume the people not paying are deadbeats. But that's hardly the case.

"This is not at all surprising," says Ken Jacobs, who heads the Center for Labor Research and Education at the University of California, Berkeley. The labor center just published a study of who's signing up for coverage in California. The research predicts that fully half the people who enroll in a plan through the California health exchange won't keep it for a full year.

That's always the case in the individual market, Jacobs says. It's transient.

"We have people who are starting in the nongroup market, and they get a job with job-based coverage and they leave," Jacobs says. "Or their income goes down and they end up going into Medicaid." Meanwhile, some others who have Medicaid experience a boost in income during the year and don't qualify anymore, "so they go into the exchange," Jacobs says, "or they get a job with job-based coverage and they leave the exchange."

In the case of the Affordable Care Act, he says, that transience was multiplied by lots of people who signed up in October and November and December — well before they had to pay their premiums.

"By the time they needed to pay," he says, "life had changed and they no longer needed that coverage."

Are There Really Fewer Uninsured?

Then there's the question of how the law is affecting people without insurance. But Jacobs says that asking whether people signing up had insurance previously is actually the wrong question — because of that same churning that affects the payment of premiums.

People move in and out of insurance all the time, he says, "and what the new marketplaces do is provide a place where people go rather than becoming uninsured during those times. And so you may have people who had insurance — job-based coverage — [then] lost their job, and now they're going into one of the marketplaces rather than becoming uninsured."

The real question then is whether the overall number of people without insurance goes down.

One presumes we'd begin to get a handle on that when the Census Bureau puts out its annual numbers in the fall. Except officials have decided to change the way they ask their health insurance questions for the Current Population Survey. (That's the study that produces the annual uninsured number.)

Those tweaks to the survey mean that, going forward, the uninsured numbers won't really be comparable to those of past years. That has produced some significant upset in the research community.

"It is a very unfortunate set of decisions in my opinion," says Blumberg of the Urban Institute. "We have all used the Current Population Survey for trends for measuring insurance coverage ... forever, it seems like, and we're not going to be able to do that because of the question changes."

Meanwhile, the Urban Institute Wednesday released a study using its own set of data. The Institute's analysis suggests that the number of non-elderly adults without insurance fell by approximately 5.4 million people between late summer 2013 and March of this year. But that number doesn't include children who gained health insurance during the ACA enrollment, nor does it include the surge of enrollments that occurred at the end of last month and early April.

Eventually, researchers say, the impact of the law will become more clear as more data become available. But "eventually" is likely to be well after this year's elections — and possibly after the presidential contest of 2016.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

As the Affordable Care Act was rolling out, we peppered NPR's Julie Rovner with questions. Many came from you, our listeners - questions about who's eligible for what, and how to enroll.

Now that the law's in effect, the question is how well it's working.The Obama administration says an estimated 7.5 million people have signed up through the health exchanges. And preliminary surveys show declines in the percentage of Americans without coverage. But as for how well the law is - or is not - meeting its goals, Julie says getting clear answers may take a while.

JULIE ROVNER, BYLINE: Among the things lots of people are asking are how many of those who've signed up have paid their premiums. How many of them were uninsured before they signed up? How big is the drop been in the number of uninsured people? In some cases, the answers to these questions simply aren't knowable, or not knowable yet, says Linda Blumberg, a senior fellow at the Urban Institute in Washington.

LINDA BLUMBERG: You know, it's very challenging, and people want answers right away, and the best datasets that we have obviously come out with a lag.

ROVNER: Part of that is due to the enormous size and complexity of the health system and the law. But it's also due to the fact that the insurance industry is mostly private and regulated by the states, says Robert Zirkelbach. He's spokesman for the trade group America's Health Insurance Plans.

ROBERT ZIRKELBACH: The impact that all of these changes are going to have on the marketplace are going to play out differently all across the country. Simply looking at national data doesn't tell you what's going to happen in a particular market in a particular state.

ROVNER: Still, let's take a closer look at some of those questions. First, how many people have actually paid their premiums for the insurance they chose on the health care exchanges? That's the final, critical step in enrollment. Most insurers are reporting numbers in the 80 to 85 percent range. The assumption is that people not paying are deadbeats, or worse. But that's hardly the case, says Ken Jacobs.

KEN JACOBS: This is not at all surprising.

ROVNER: Jacobs heads the Center for Labor Research and Education at the University of California Berkeley. It just published a study of who's signing up for coverage in California. The study predicts that fully half the people who enroll in a plan through California's health exchange won't keep it for a full year. He says that's always the case in the individual market. It's transient.

JACOBS: Someone loses a job, with job-based coverage, gets covered on the non-group market for a period of time, gets a new job that now has job-based coverage again, and leaves.

ROVNER: In the case of the Affordable Care Act, that was multiplied, because lots of people signed up well before they had to pay their premiums, in October and November and December.

JACOBS: So the reasons for nonpayment, some of part of that is simply that by the time they were needed to pay, life had changed and they no longer needed that coverage.

ROVNER: Because they had gotten a job with insurance, or they found out they qualified for Medicaid.

Then there's the question of how the law is impacting the number of people without insurance. Jacobs says that asking whether people signing up previously had insurance is actually the wrong question. That's because of that same churning that affects premium payments. People move in and out of insurance all the time.

JACOBS: And what the new marketplaces do is provide a place where people go rather than becoming uninsured during those times. And so, you see, you may have people who had insurance, job-based coverage, lost their job, and now they're going into one of the marketplaces, rather than becoming uninsured.

ROVNER: So the real question then is whether the overall number of people without insurance goes down. One presumes we'd start to get a handle on that when the Census Bureau puts out its annual numbers in the fall. Except officials have decided to change the way they ask their survey questions for the current population survey. That's the study that produces the annual uninsured number. That means numbers going forward won't really be comparable to those of past years. That's upsetting to researchers like Linda Blumberg of the Urban Institute.

BLUMBERG: It is a very unfortunate set of decisions, in my opinion, because of that. I mean, we have all used the current population survey for trends in measuring insurance coverage along with, you know, many other different outcomes forever, it seems like. And we're not going to be able to do that because of the question changes.

ROVNER: Eventually, researchers say, the impact of the law will be more clear as more data becomes available. But eventually is likely to be well after this year's elections, and possibly after the presidential contest of 2016.

Julie Rovner, NPR News, Washington. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.