Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Donald Trump picked a military town — Virginia Beach, Va. — to give a speech Monday on how he would go about overhauling the Department of Veterans Affairs if elected.

He blamed the Obama administration for a string of scandals at the VA during the past two years, and claimed that his rival, Hillary Clinton, has downplayed the problems and won't fix them.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Obama Revs Up House Democrats For Election-Year Fight

Jan 27, 2012
Originally published on January 30, 2012 10:09 am

President Obama flew out to Maryland's Eastern Shore on Friday to fire up his rank and file in Congress.

House Democrats have spent the past few days in their annual retreat, regrouping and strategizing for the year to come. Lawmakers say their hopes for success — in the economy and in politics — depend on sticking together and sending the same message to Americans.

The head of the House Democratic Caucus, John Larson of Connecticut, whipped up the crowd before Obama's speech. Democrats, he said, came out of the president's State of the Union address this week with a fresh message "that reignited and energized this caucus, but more importantly the American people. Inspired, we came here to work!"

Lawmakers jumped to their feet, cheering the arrival of the Democrat in chief.

Obama recapped many of the themes in his State of the Union speech, stressing manufacturing, bringing outsourced jobs back to the United States and leveling the playing field, he said, for the middle class.

"We are focusing on companies that are investing right here in the United States, because we believe that when you make it in America, everybody benefits, everybody does well," he said.

The president also talked about the biggest thorn in his side — the House Republicans. In their year in the majority, the Republicans have tussled with Democrats over even the most basic functions of government. Voters are starting to understand that, Obama said, but that doesn't mean Democrats should stop trying to work with them.

"Wherever we have an opportunity, wherever there is the possibility that the other side is putting some politics aside for just a nanosecond in order to get something done for the American people, we've got to be right there ready to meet them," Obama said.

Americans are facing too many problems right now to stop trying, the president said.

"On the other hand, where they obstruct, where they're unwilling to act, where they're more interested in party than they are in country, more interested in the next election than the next generation, then we've got to call them out on it," Obama said.

That's a preview of Democrats' election message: They've done everything they can, they'll say, and Republicans have played politics.

Vice President Joe Biden spoke to the lawmakers earlier Friday, wondering out loud how the GOP can expect to govern when "compromise" is a dirty word.

"Who do you make a deal with? Who can you reach out and shake hands with and say, 'We have a bargain?' That's the way this country's always functioned," Biden said.

And as for the Republican presidential hopefuls, Biden said whoever is nominated — whether it's Newt Gingrich or Mitt Romney or someone else — he will provide a stark contrast to how the Democrats approach governing.

"When these guys [are] out there saying, 'Let Detroit go bankrupt' or 'Poor people have no habit of working' or ... 'Barack Obama's the food-stamp president,' I think it's not just political theater. I really think they believe it," Biden said.

And that, said both Biden and Obama, may be an advantage for Democrats this election year. The message they are sending is so very different from the Republicans' message, they said, that come November, the choice voters have will be crystal clear.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News.

Now, a dispatch from the House Democrats' retreat. The rank-and-file have spent the last few days on Maryland's Eastern Shore for their annual gathering. They're strategizing for the year to come. And today, President Obama flew out to join them and to offer a pep talk.

NPR's Andrea Seabrook headed out to the shore as well, and she sent this report.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Ho.

ANDREA SEABROOK, BYLINE: The head of the Democratic Caucus, John Larson, whipped up the crowd. Democrats, he said, came out of the president's State of the Union address this week with a fresh, new message...

REPRESENTATIVE JOHN LARSON: That reignited and energized this caucus...

(SOUNDBITE OF CHEERING AND APPLAUSE)

LARSON: ...but more importantly, the American people inspired. We came here to work.

SEABROOK: Lawmakers jumped to their feet, cheering the arrival of the Democrat in chief.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE AND CHEERING)

PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA: Thank you.

SEABROOK: President Obama recapped many of the themes in his State of the Union speech, stressing manufacturing, bringing outsourced jobs back to the U.S., leveling the playing field, he said, for the middle class.

OBAMA: We are focusing on companies that are investing right here in the United States because we believe that when you make it in America, everybody benefits, everybody does well.

SEABROOK: The president also talked about the biggest thorn in his side: the House Republicans. In their year in the majority, the GOP and Democrats have tussled over even the most basic functions of government. Voters are starting to understand that, said Mr. Obama, but that doesn't mean Democrats should stop trying to work with them.

OBAMA: Wherever we have an opportunity, wherever there is the possibility that the other side is putting some politics aside for just a nanosecond in order to get something done for the American people, we've got to be right there ready to meet them. We've got to be right there ready to meet them.

SEABROOK: Americans are facing too many problems right now to stop trying, the president said.

OBAMA: On the other hand, where they obstruct, where they're unwilling to act, where they're more interested in party than they are in country, more interested in the next election than the next generation, then we've got to call them out on it.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE AND CHEERING)

OBAMA: We've got to call them out on it.

SEABROOK: That's a preview of Democrats' election message: They've done everything they can, they'll say, and Republicans have played politics. Vice President Joe Biden spoke to the lawmakers earlier today, wondering out loud how the GOP can expect to govern when compromise is a dirty word.

VICE PRESIDENT JOE BIDEN: Who do you make a deal with? Who can you reach out and shake hands with and say, we have a bargain? That's the way this country has always functioned.

SEABROOK: And as for the Republican presidential hopefuls, Biden said whoever is nominated, whether it's Newt Gingrich or Mitt Romney or someone else, he will provide a stark contrast to how the Democrats approach governing.

BIDEN: When these guys out there are saying let Detroit go bankrupt or poor people have no habit of working or the Barack Obama is the food stamp president, I think it's not just political theater. I really think they believe it.

SEABROOK: That, said Biden and President Obama, may be an advantage for Democrats this election year. The message they're sending is so very different from the Republicans', they said, that come November, the choice voters have will be crystal clear. Andrea Seabrook, NPR News, Cambridge, Maryland. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.