"O Canada," the national anthem of our neighbors up north, comes in two official versions — English and French. They share a melody, but differ in meaning.

Let the record show: neither of those lyrics contains the phrase "all lives matter."

But at the 2016 All-Star Game, the song got an unexpected edit.

At Petco Park in San Diego, one member of the Canadian singing group The Tenors — by himself, according to the other members of the group — revised the anthem.

School's out, and a lot of parents are getting through the long summer days with extra helpings of digital devices.

How should we feel about that?

Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Obama: Focus On The Next 4 Years, Not The Last Ones

May 6, 2012
Originally published on May 6, 2012 8:39 pm

President Obama says the country has come too far in the last four years to change course now. He kicked off his re-election campaign Saturday with a pair of high-profile rallies in two pivotal states, Ohio and Virginia.

Obama acknowledged the economic recovery still has a long way to go. Yet he argued his Republican challenger, Mitt Romney, would move the country backward, not forward.

Unsatisfied With Unemployment

The president's first official re-election rallies had some of the trappings of his 2008 campaign: huge crowds, stirring music, even the old standby chant of "Fired Up, Ready to Go."

Obama said this campaign is still about hope and change, though he acknowledged many hopes were dashed by the severe recession that cost 3 million jobs in the six months before he took office.

"It was tough. But I tell you what, Ohio. The American people are tougher," he said.

The president stressed the 4 million jobs that private employers have added in the last two years. Voters got another reminder, though, of the uneven pace of that recovery with a weaker-than-expected jobs report on Friday.

"Are we satisfied? Of course not. Too many of our friends and family are still out there looking for work," he said.

Obama is eager to frame the election not as a referendum on the last four years, but rather a choice between his agenda and the Republicans'. He said the important question is not whether you're better off now than before the economic crisis hit, but whose policies will make you and the country better off in the future.

'We Tried It Their Way'

He argued that Romney has drawn the wrong lesson from his own successful business career. Outsourcing jobs or busting unions might help an individual company's bottom line, Obama said, but it's not the right course for average Americans or the U.S. economy.

"The true measure of our prosperity is more than just a running tally of every balance sheet and quarterly profit report," he said. "I don't care how many ways you try to explain it. Corporations aren't people. People are people."

Obama argued that Romney would rubber-stamp the agenda of congressional Republicans, with big tax cuts for the wealthy, big cuts in spending on programs for the middle class and fewer regulations on Wall Street and insurance companies.

He said that's the same agenda Republicans pursued before the financial crisis.

"They're just hoping you won't remember what happened the last time we tried it their way," Obama said. "Virginia, I'm here to say that we were there. We remember. And we're not going back. We're moving this country forward."

Supporters in the crowd waved blue placards that read "Forward," and red signs that said, "Not Back."

Putting Up A Fight

Romney campaign spokeswoman Andrea Saul issued a statement saying, "No matter how many lofty campaign speeches President Obama gives, the fact remains that American families are struggling on his watch."

Both sides are already campaigning hard in battleground states. Pete Snyder heads a Republican organizing effort in Virginia.

"We are not leaving any ounce, any yard of this football field to Barack Obama and the Democrats this year," he says. "Look, in 2008, we got our clocks cleaned on the ground. You know it. We know it. We're never going to let that happen again."

One function of the president's rallies Saturday was to sign up and motivate his own volunteers. Supporters were urged to register voters and campaign door-to-door between now and November, with first lady Michelle Obama stressing that the race is likely to decided by a relative handful of votes.

"So with every door you knock on, with every single call you make, every single conversation, I want you to remember, this could be the one, right? This could be the one that makes the difference," she said. "And that is the kind of impact that each of you can have in this election."

The preliminaries are over. The general election campaign is underway.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. President Barack Obama says the country has come too far in the last four years to change course now. He kicked off his re-election campaign yesterday with a pair of high-profile rallies in two pivotal states, Ohio and Virginia. Mr. Obama said, yes, he understands that the economic recovery still has a long way to go, but he argues his Republican challenger, Mitt Romney, would move the country backward, not forward. NPR's Scott Horsley reports.

SCOTT HORSLEY, BYLINE: The president's first official re-election rallies had some of the trappings of his 2008 campaign: huge crowds, stirring music, even the old standby chant of Fired Up, Ready to Go.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHANTING)

HORSLEY: Mr. Obama said this campaign is still about hope and change, though he acknowledged many hopes were dashed by the severe recession that cost three million jobs in the six months before he took office.

PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA: It was tough. But I tell you what, Ohio. The American people are tougher.

HORSLEY: The president stressed the four million jobs private employers have added in the last two years. Voters got another reminder, though, of the uneven pace of that recovery with a weaker-than-expected jobs report on Friday.

OBAMA: Are we satisfied?

(SOUNDBITE OF CROWD RESPONDING, NO)

OBAMA: Of course not. Too many of our friends and family are still out there looking for work.

HORSLEY: Mr. Obama is eager to frame the election not as a referendum on the last four years, but rather a choice between his agenda and the Republicans. He said the important question is not whether you're better off now than before the economic crisis hit, but whose policies will make you and the country better off in the future. He argued that Republican rival Mitt Romney has drawn the wrong lesson from his own successful business career. Outsourcing jobs or busting unions might help an individual company's bottom line, Mr. Obama said, but it's not the right course for average Americans or the U.S. economy.

OBAMA: The true measure of our prosperity is more than just a running tally of every balance sheet and quarterly profit report. I don't care how many ways you try to explain it. Corporations aren't people. People are people.

(SOUNDBITE OF CROWD CHEERING)

HORSLEY: Mr. Obama argued that Romney would rubber-stamp the agenda of congressional Republicans, with big tax cuts for the wealthy, big cuts in spending on programs for the middle class and fewer regulations on Wall Street and insurance companies. He said that's the same agenda Republicans pursued before the financial crisis.

OBAMA: They're just hoping you won't remember what happened the last time we tried it their way. Virginia, I'm here to say that we were there. We remember. And we're not going back. We're moving this country forward.

HORSLEY: Supporters in the crowd waved blue placards that read Forward, and red signs that said, Not Back.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHANTING)

HORSLEY: Romney campaign spokeswoman Andrea Saul issued a statement saying no matter how many lofty campaign speeches President Obama gives, the fact remains that American families are struggling on his watch. Both sides are already campaigning hard in battleground states. Pete Snyder heads a Republican organizing effort in Virginia.

PETE SNYDER: We are not leaving any ounce, any yard of this football field to Barack Obama and to the Democrats this year. Look, in 2008, we got our clocks cleaned on the ground. You know it. We know it. We're never going to let that happen again.

HORSLEY: One function of the president's rallies yesterday was to sign up and motivate his own volunteers. Supporters were urged to register voters and campaign door-to-door between now and November. First lady Michelle Obama stressing that the race is likely to be decided by a relative handful of votes.

MICHELLE OBAMA: With every single call you make, every single conversation, I want you to remember that this could be the one, right? This could be the one that makes the difference.

HORSLEY: The preliminaries are over. The general election campaign is underway. Scott Horsley, NPR News. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.