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Let the record show: neither version of those lyrics contains the phrase "all lives matter."

But at the 2016 All-Star Game, the song got an unexpected edit.

At Petco Park in San Diego, one member of the Canadian singing group The Tenors — by himself, according to the other members of the group — revised the anthem.

School's out, and a lot of parents are getting through the long summer days with extra helpings of digital devices.

How should we feel about that?

Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she disparaged him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb political statements" about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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A Nobel Acceptance Speech — Two Decades Overdue

Jun 12, 2012
Originally published on June 12, 2012 10:49 pm

Aung San Suu Kyi heads to Europe Wednesday, where she'll deliver a speech she was invited to give more than two decades ago: the one for her 1991 Nobel Peace Prize, which she was unable to collect while under house arrest.

In Myanmar's largest city, Yangon, at the headquarters of Suu Kyi's party, spokesman U Nyan Win says she is busy writing speeches for her extended trip to Europe, including the visit to Oslo for the belated Nobel address this weekend.

The journey will also take her back to Oxford, England, where she lived until 1988, before she became an icon of nonviolent political protest, and before Burma's then-military rulers changed the name of the country to Myanmar.

She'll be one of the few non-heads of state to address both houses of Parliament in London. In Dublin, she'll share a stage with Bono and U2.

"The [National League for Democracy] has stood firm for more than 20 years thanks in part to international support," says U Nyan Win, the spokesman. "We are stronger and more confident because of it. Lately, we have been trying to reform our party and we hope to hold a party congress later this year. This is a very crucial time for the party, and 'The Lady' needs the moral support of the international community."

Suu Kyi, or as everyone here calls her, The Lady, recently reminded foreign supporters not to get too euphoric yet about her country's limited democratic reforms. And she added that Myanmarese themselves will have to shoulder most of the burden of building their own democracy.

"I believe that sanctions have had great effect, politically," Suu Kyi says. "If they had not had such effect, the government of Burma would not have been so eager to have them removed. But in the ultimate analysis, we depend neither on sanctions nor on other external factors for real change in our countries. We depend on ourselves."

Sectarian Violence

For now, domestic attention in Myanmar is focused not on Suu Kyi's travels but on ethnic and sectarian violence in Rakhine state, which borders on Bangladesh.

Reports last month that Muslims raped and murdered a Buddhist girl set off waves of mob violence and revenge killings.

Over the weekend, Buddhists marched around Yangon's Shwedagon Pagoda, calling for the government to enforce immigration laws and protect them from what they consider illegal Rohingya and Bengali immigrants.

"The extremist Bengali illegal immigrants have killed residents and burned down many villages," activist Kyaw Minn Khing told the crowd. "We call on the government to send more troops to protect the residents."

Meanwhile, Suu Kyi is trying to build the NLD from a protest movement into a political party that can win the 2015 general elections. The former ruling junta would not allow her to build party institutions, so the NLD has been completely dependent on her.

Restructuring The Movement

Ko Ko Gyi, a former student leader during the 1988 pro-democracy movement, explains.

"This is very natural for the transitional period. Because of the longtime oppression, we have [a] lack of experience about democratization. So that's why for the time being, [we] just depend on the person," he says.

Next week, Suu Kyi turns 67. Most NLD leaders are in their 70s or 80s. The NLD is trying to restructure itself to become younger and more democratic. But they have not invited Ko Ko Gyi and his fellow activists to join them.

U Win Tin, 82, who founded the NLD in 1988 with Suu Kyi, says he is optimistic that the reorganization of the party will breathe new life into it.

"I hope, at the end of this party transformation, next year perhaps, we will be [a] well-organized and youthful and very active party," he says.

For now, U Win Tin soldiers on, still editing the NLD's newsletter and dealing with the growing number of reporters beating a path to The Lady's door.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

The Burmese opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi returns to Europe tomorrow after a 24-year absence. The journey will take her to Oxford, England, where she lived until 1988. That was before she became an icon of nonviolent political protest, and before Burma's military rulers renamed the country Myanmar. Suu Kyi's trip comes as she makes the difficult transition from protest leader to politician, and as sectarian violence threatens her country's fledgling democratic reforms.

NPR's Anthony Kuhn reports from Yangon.

ANTHONY KUHN, BYLINE: At the headquarters of Suu Kyi's party, the National League for Democracy, spokesman U Nyan Win says that Suu Kyi is busy at the moment writing speeches. She'll deliver one in Oslo as a belated acceptance speech for the 1991 Nobel Peace Prize she was unable to collect while under house arrest. She'll give another one as one of the few non-heads of state to address both Houses of Parliament in London. And she'll thank her many international supporters.

U NYAN WIN: (Through Translator) The NLD has stood firm for more than 20 years, thanks in part to international support. We are stronger and more confident because of it. Lately, we have been trying to reform our party and we hope to hold a party congress later this year. This is a very crucial time for the party, and The Lady needs the moral support of the international community.

KUHN: Suu Kyi, or as everyone here calls her, The Lady, recently reminded foreign supporters not to get too euphoric yet about her country's democratic reforms. And she added that Burmese themselves will have to shoulder most of the burden of building their own democracy.

AUNG SAN SUU KYI: I believe that sanctions have had great effect, politically. If they had not had such effect, the government of Burma would not have been so eager to have them removed. But in the ultimate analysis, we depend neither on sanctions nor the other external factors for real change in our countries. We depend on ourselves.

KUHN: For now, domestic attention in Myanmar is focused not on Suu Kyi's travels but on ethnic and sectarian violence in Rakhine State, which borders on Bangladesh. Reports last month that Muslims had raped and murdered a Buddhist girl set off waves of mob violence and revenge killings.

(SOUNDBITE OF YELLING)

KUHN: Over the weekend, Buddhists marched around Yangon's Shwedagon Pagoda, calling for the government to enforce immigration laws and protect them from what they consider illegal Rohingya and Bengali immigrants.

Activist Kyaw Minn Khing addressed the crowd.

KYWA MINN KHING: (Through Translator) The extremist Bengali illegal immigrants have killed residents and burned down many villages in northern Rakhine State. We call on the government to send more troops to protect the residents.

KUHN: Meanwhile, Suu Kyi is trying to build the NLD from a protest movement into a political party that can win the 2015 general election. The former ruling junta would not allow her to build party institutions, so the NLD has been completely dependent on person - her.

Ko Ko Gyi, a former student leader during the 1988 pro-democracy movement, explains.

KO KO GYI: This is very natural for the transitional period. Because of the longtime oppression, we have lack of experience about democratization. So that's why for the time being, just depend on the person. We cannot avoid.

KUHN: Next week, Suu Kyi turns 67. Most NLD leaders are in their 70's or 80's. The NLD is trying to restructure itself to become younger and more democratic. But they have not invited Ko Ko Gyi and his fellow activists to join them. Ko Ko Gyi refers to her using the honorific title Daw.

GYI: I think Daw San Suu Kyi will consider deeply about the reform, and how to deal with the younger generations. I hope so.

KUHN: Eighty-two-year-old U Win Tin founded the NLD in 1988 with Aung San Suu Kyi. He's optimistic that the reorganization of the party will breathe new life into it.

U WIN TIN: I hope this year we will be well-organized and youthful and very active party.

KUHN: For now, U Win Tin soldiers on, still editing the NLD's newsletter and dealing with the growing number of reporters beating a path to The Lady's door.

Anthony Kuhn, NPR News, Yangon. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.