"O Canada," the national anthem of our neighbors up north, comes in two official versions — English and French. They share a melody, but differ in meaning.

Let the record show: neither version of those lyrics contains the phrase "all lives matter."

But at the 2016 All-Star Game, the song got an unexpected edit.

At Petco Park in San Diego, one member of the Canadian singing group The Tenors — by himself, according to the other members of the group — revised the anthem.

School's out, and a lot of parents are getting through the long summer days with extra helpings of digital devices.

How should we feel about that?

Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she disparaged him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb political statements" about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Pages

New Schedules Push Graveyard Shift Off The Clock

Jun 14, 2012
Originally published on June 14, 2012 10:54 pm

As car companies struggle to meet growing demand, the third shift is making a comeback. But many factories running on three shifts are doing it differently from in the past. And that new "three crew" shift pattern could make what's normally a hard job even harder.

At Ford's Michigan Assembly Plant in Wayne, employees work 10-hour shifts four days a week. The so-called A crew gets days, while the B crew gets afternoons. But the C crew shift rotates its start time every week. On Fridays and Saturdays, workers start at 6:00 a.m. On Mondays and Tuesdays, they start at 4:30 p.m.

The new work pattern encourages companies to add jobs, according to the United Auto Workers. Factories can run six days a week instead of five, so they produce more cars.

More Jobs And More 'Jet Lag'?

Both Ford and Chrysler plan to keep to the three-crew pattern in the future when adding a third shift. Chrysler spokeswoman Jodi Tinson admits working 10 hours is a long day. But workers also get three days a week off, and she says it's better than the alternative, which can be lots of required overtime.

"They're not working these crazy long hours and lots of overtime that has really taken a toll on their personal health [and] their relationships with their family," Tinson says.

Still, the UAW contract lets the company tack an extra hour and a half of overtime to the end of the 10-hour shifts if necessary.

And there's a hidden cost for the C crew, according to Ronald Chervin, head of the University of Michigan Sleep Disorder Center. Rotating working hours can feel like having a bad case of jet lag, one that does not go away.

"We're very well-constructed to have a robust circadian rhythm," Chervin explains. "So the brain expects you to be awake certain parts of a 24-hour cycle and expects you to be asleep [during others]."

'It Caused Us Issues'

General Motors has tried this scheduling pattern, but Larry Zahner, the company's manufacturing manager for North America, says GM did not like waiting until Sunday to do preventive maintenance and did not like the new schedule's effect on workers.

"[The third shift] really doesn't work for people in the U.S. It just caused us issues," Zahner says.

In Trenton, Mich., the Chrysler engine plant rotated all three crews between days and evenings for two years in a row. But it proved to be disastrous.

"During that time, we had an enormous uptick [of employees out on medical leave and family medical leave]," Zahner explains. "People were missing work and/or coming in extremely late because they couldn't catch up on their sleep."

Now, the Chrysler factory is experimenting with an even more complicated pattern — six crews with everyone working days or afternoons. Gabe Solano, president of UAW Local 372, which represents workers at the Trenton plant, says it appears to be working despite some hiccups.

Looking On The Bright Side

But the rotating C crew shift will remain a fixture at Chrysler and Ford, including at Michigan Assembly Plant in Wayne.

Christopher Hanson, a veteran employee at Michigan Assembly who also goes by the nickname "Happy," chose to join the third shift, unlike many of his coworkers. In this tough economy, he's looking on the bright side.

"There are far worse things to be out doing than working a nondesirable shift here at Ford Motor Co.," Hanson says.

Ford will soon add a third rotating shift in Louisville, Ky., and Chrysler will add the shifts at its plants in Kokomo, Ind. That's hundreds more people on C crew, losing sleep but earning a living and reducing the country's stubbornly high unemployment rate.

Copyright 2013 Michigan Radio. To see more, visit http://michiganradio.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

The third shift is making a comeback at some auto plants around the country. Car companies are stepping up production to meet growing demand, and many of these factories are taking a new approach to scheduling that additional shift. Michigan Radio's Tracy Samilton reports it could make a hard job even harder.

TRACY SAMILTON, BYLINE: Hundreds of so-called C crew workers are streaming out of Ford's Michigan assembly plant in Wayne on this hot afternoon. People here work 10-hour shifts four days a week. The A crew gets days and the B crew gets afternoons. But the C crew rotates its start time. Friday and Saturday, workers start at 6:00 a.m. Monday and Tuesday, they start at 4:30 p.m. Back and forth every week. Christopher Hanson goes by the nickname Happy. Unlike many of his coworkers, he chose this shift.

CHRISTOPHER HANSON: With my seniority, I had the option, but I decided to take C crew, worked out better. I work a second job on top of this.

SAMILTON: The UAW says the pattern encourages the companies to add jobs, and Ford saves a lot of money on overtime. Factories also run six days a week, not five, so they produce more cars. This is the way Ford plans to add third shifts in the future at U.S. plants. The same is true for Chrysler. Spokeswoman Jodi Tinson says, sure, 10 hours is a long day, but workers also get three days a week off. And she says it's better than the alternative, which can be lots of required overtime.

JODI TINSON: They're not working these crazy long hours and lots of overtime that has really taken a toll on, you know, their personal health, their relationships with their family.

SAMILTON: But there's no guarantee. The UAW contract lets the company tack an extra hour and a half overtime to the end of the 10-hour shifts if need be. And there's a hidden cost for the C crew. Ron Chervin is head of the University of Michigan Sleep Disorder Center.

RON CHERVIN: We're very well constructed to have a robust circadian rhythm, and so the brain expects you to be awake certain parts of a 24-hour cycle and expects you to be asleep.

SAMILTON: So rotating working hours can be like having a bad case of jetlag, one that doesn't go away. General Motors has tried this scheduling pattern, but GM's Larry Zahner says the company didn't like waiting until Sunday to do preventive maintenance and didn't like the effect on workers.

LARRY ZAHNER: Well, that really doesn't work for people in the U.S. It just caused us issues.

SAMILTON: Issues? Gabe Solano can tell you about issues. He's president of Local 372. His Chrysler engine plant rotated all three crews between days and evenings for two years in a row. It was disastrous.

GABE SOLANO: During that time, we had an enormous uptick in medicals, an enormous uptick in FMLAs, which is your family medical leave. People were missing work and/or coming in extremely late because they couldn't catch up on their sleep.

SAMILTON: Now, the factory is experimenting with an even more complicated pattern, six crews, but everyone stays on days or afternoons. Solano says it appears to be working despite some hiccups. But the rotating C crew shift will remain a fixture at Chrysler and Ford, including at Michigan assembly. The guy they call Happy says he's looking on the bright side because it could be worse.

HANSON: There's unemployment. There are far worse things to be out doing than be working a non-desirable shift here at Ford Motor Company.

SAMILTON: Ford will soon add a third rotating shift in Louisville. Chrysler will add the shifts at its Kokomo plant. That's hundreds more people on C crew losing sleep but earning a living and reducing the country's stubbornly high unemployment rate. For NPR News, I'm Tracy Samilton in Ann Arbor. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.