NPR Politics presents the Lunchbox List: our favorite campaign news and stories curated from NPR and around the Web in digestible bites (100 words or less!). Look for it every weekday afternoon from now until the conventions.

Convention Countdown

The Republican National Convention is in 4 days in Cleveland.

The Democratic National Convention is in 11 days in Philadelphia.

NASA has released the first picture of Jupiter taken since the Juno spacecraft went into orbit around the planet on July 4.

The picture was taken on July 10. Juno was 2.7 million miles from Jupiter at the time. The color image shows some of the atmospheric features of the planet, including the giant red spot. You can also see three of Jupiter's moons in the picture: Io, Europa and Ganymede.

The Senate is set to approve a bill intended to change the way police and health care workers treat people struggling with opioid addictions.

My husband and I once took great pleasure in preparing meals from scratch. We made pizza dough and sauce. We baked bread. We churned ice cream.

Then we became parents.

Now there are some weeks when pre-chopped veggies and a rotisserie chicken are the only things between us and five nights of Chipotle.

Parents are busy. For some of us, figuring out how to get dinner on the table is a daily struggle. So I reached out to food experts, parents and nutritionists for help. Here is some of their (and my) best advice for making weeknight meals happen.

"O Canada," the national anthem of our neighbors up north, comes in two official versions — English and French. They share a melody, but differ in meaning.

Let the record show: neither version of those lyrics contains the phrase "all lives matter."

But at the 2016 All-Star Game, the song got an unexpected edit.

At Petco Park in San Diego, one member of the Canadian singing group The Tenors — by himself, according to the other members of the group — revised the anthem.

School's out, and a lot of parents are getting through the long summer days with extra helpings of digital devices.

How should we feel about that?

Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she disparaged him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb political statements" about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Pages

New iPhone Plug Spells Inconvenience For Users, Change For Accessory Makers

Sep 12, 2012

I kind of think of Philz Coffee in Palo Alto, Calif., as the epicenter of Apple fanatics. It's so hip, only hand-poured specialty blends are sold here.

Every day dozens of techie types come to Philz for coffee and then lounge around on the leather sofa sipping away, often with Apple products scattered in front of them.

Yeliz Ustabas has an Apple laptop perched next to her and an iPhone balanced on her knee.

Normally, Ustabas says she's pretty quick to buy the latest thing Apple has to offer. But this morning, before Apple unveiled the iPhone 5, she said this time she might wait to purchase the new smartphone.

"For now, the 4S seems better. So I am going to wait a little bit I guess," Ustabas said.

The reason is the new phone's new connector. Since its debut five years ago, all iPhones have used the same kind of port for charging and docking. An entire industry of iPhone accessories has grown up around this simple little plug.

Scores of different companies sell speakers — docking stations, adapters for car radios and chargers — and they were all built for the old plug. And iPhone accessories are big business. Michael Morgan, who follows the industry for ABI Research, says sales of accessories total $5 billion to $10 billion a year.

Not all iPhone accessories will have to be redesigned because of the new plug and cord — old headphones and speakers that use Bluetooth or Wi-Fi to connect are fine — but pretty much everything else will need to be tweaked or require an adapter to work.

Now Apple is making these adapters, but true Apple freaks will need dozens. If you have built your electronic life around an iPhone that could be kind of annoying — and expensive.

"If you are on the road and you are traveling, it's just another thing to get lost," says Andrea Seebaum, an iPhone user in San Francisco.

But Apple didn't make this change just to mess with you. Morgan says there are good reasons Apple changed this little plug.

"They held out for five years. You might say they were due," he says.

A smaller plug makes room for a bigger battery. Although Apple calls the new plug the "Lightning connector," NPR's Laura Sydell, who was at the Apple event, tells me syncing your iPhone with this connection will be no faster than the older, bigger version.

The new design is 80 percent smaller and Apple says it's easier to use. (But was the old version that hard? It's a plug after all.)

Changing the cord probably made Apple's new thinner design possible but it creates an odd dynamic for consumers thinking about buying the new phone.

While the change is a headache for some consumers it's a business opportunity for accessory makers. Philip Schiller, Apple's senior vice president of worldwide marketing, told the audience in San Francisco that JBL, Bose, Bang & Olufsen and B&W are already building new speakers for the new phone.

And for those Apple fans who have to have the iPhone 5 but have lots of accessories they want to keep, Apple will sell a variety of adapters too — they'll range from $19 to $39 each.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

While the iPhone 5 has a number of new features to entice customers, NPR's Steve Henn reports a new cord could tie Apple's most devoted fans in knots.

STEVE HENN, BYLINE: I kind of think of Philz Coffee in Palo Alto as the epicenter of Apple fanatics. It's hip. In fact, it's so hip it's too hip for espresso drinks. Only hand-poured specialty blends are sold here. Could I get a decaf Swiss water organic Peru?

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: Absolutely.

HENN: Every day, dozens of techie types come here for coffee and then lounge around on the leather sofa sipping away, often with Apple products scattered out in front of them. Yeliz Ustabas has an Apple laptop perched next to her and an iPhone balanced on her knee. How many Apple gadgets do you think you own?

YELIZ USTABAS: You know what, I don't know.

(LAUGHTER)

USTABAS: A lot.

HENN: Normally, Yeliz says she's pretty quick to buy the latest thing Apple has to offer. But this morning, before Apple unveiled its new phone, she said this time, she might wait.

USTABAS: For now, 4S seems better.

(LAUGHTER)

USTABAS: So I'm going to wait a little bit, I guess, so.

HENN: The reason is the new phone's new connector. Since its debut more than five years ago, all of Apple's iPhones have used the same kind of port for charging and docking. And since then, an entire industry of iPhone accessories has grown up around this simple little plug. Scores of different companies sell speakers, docking stations, adapters for car radios, battery packs and other stuff. IPhone accessories are big business.

MICHAEL MORGAN: You could see anywhere from five to $10 billion a year in revenues.

HENN: Michael Morgan follows the industry for ABI Research. He says not all iPhone accessories will have to be redesigned because of the new plug and cord. Old headphones are fine, so are speakers that use Bluetooth or wireless to connect. But pretty much everything else will need to be tweaked or require an adapter to work. Now, Apple is making these adapters, but true Apple freaks will need dozens of them.

ANDREA SEEBAUM: So we have a music dock that is for our Sonos music system. We have chargers all over the house for the iPhone.

HENN: Andrea Seebaum and Steve Deautsch live in San Francisco.

STEVE DEAUTSCH: We have two cars, both of which have docks.

SEEBAUM: Right. Mine is built into my car. Steve's is aftermarket.

HENN: If you've built your electronic life around an iPhone, it could be kind of annoying.

SEEBAUM: The other problem with the little connectors if you're on the road and you're traveling, it's just another thing to get lost.

HENN: But Apple didn't make this change just to mess with you. Michael Morgan, from ABI Research, says there are good reasons Apple changed its little plug.

MORGAN: They held out for five years before they did this. You might say it was due.

HENN: A smaller plug makes room for a bigger battery. Apple says its easier to use, but it's a plug, and it creates kind of an odd dynamic for these new phones. The switch is the biggest hassle for those consumers who love Apple gadgets the most. Talk about First World problems. Steve Henn, NPR News, Silicon Valley. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.