Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Donald Trump picked a military town — Virginia Beach, Va. — to give a speech Monday on how he would go about overhauling the Department of Veterans Affairs if elected.

He blamed the Obama administration for a string of scandals at the VA during the past two years, and claimed that his rival, Hillary Clinton, has downplayed the problems and won't fix them.

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Pages

Neighs Have It: Horse Tale Ensnares British Leader

Mar 5, 2012

In Britain, there's a long waiting list of British animal lovers hoping to take in aging police horses. Once retired, the horses aren't supposed to be ridden again.

Unless, it seems, you're Rebekah Brooks, the former tabloid editor and chief executive of Rupert Murdoch's News International, or David Cameron, the man who would become Britain's prime minister.

The ongoing inquiry into the relationship between the police and news media has uncovered a new scandal: Scotland Yard appears to have loaned Brooks a police horse back in 2008.

Brooks, the former Murdoch executive at the heart of the phone hacking and bribery scandal roiling Britain, didn't just jump the queue — she also rode the horse, called Raisa, before returning the steed, which has since died, two years later.

And, last week, at an emergency European Union summit in Brussels, Cameron was forced to end days of speculation and qualified denials to admit that he, too, had ridden Raisa — before becoming prime minister, and in the company of Charlie Brooks, a fellow Old Etonian and Rebekah Brooks' husband.

"I am very sorry to hear that Raisa is no longer with us," Cameron said. "And I think should probably conclude that I don't think I'll be getting back into the saddle anytime soon."

Britain's political satirists haven't had this much fun since someone leaked untrue allegations that another Conservative prime minister, John Major, tucked his shirt into his underpants.

"It is quite rarely that something so juicy falls into your lap like this," political cartoonist Steve Bell said to the BBC.

Bell drew a cartoon depicting Rupert Murdoch riding Cameron horsey-style and holding Brooks' severed head on his lap.

But most damaging to Cameron's image isn't the Murdoch connection, Bell says. It's the reminder that the prime minister, who likes to paint himself as a regular guy, is actually from Britain's landed elite.

"He knows ... this ... upper class, 'posh bloke on a horse' is bad news for him," Bell says.

Sheila Gunn, Major's former press secretary, says this is a perfect story for Britain.

"There's two things that seem to obsess the British, even now — and that is class and animals," Gunn says.

Her advice to Conservative Party operatives: Impose radio silence, do everything possible to starve the story of oxygen.

British satirists say that's not likely.

They say the scandal — dubbed "Horsegate" — could run longer than John Major's underpants did.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

If you thought the British scandal involving newspapers and phone hacking couldn't get any more absurd, think again. The latest chapter involves a former news executive, the prime minister, and a horse. It seems Scotland Yard loaned the horse to Rebekah Brooks. She's Rupert Murdoch's now-ousted protege. And she runs, or shall we say trots, in the same circles as Prime Minister David Cameron.

Vicki Barker picks up the story from there.

VICKI BARKER, BYLINE: There's a long waiting list of British animal lovers hoping to take in aging police horses. Once retired, the horses aren't supposed to be ridden again.

Former Murdoch executive Rebekah Brooks didn't just jump the queue, she also rode the horse, called Raisa, before returning the steed, which has since died, two years later.

And, last week, at the emergency E.U. summit in Brussels, David Cameron was forced to end days of speculation and qualified denials to admit that he, too, had ridden Raisa before becoming prime minister, and in the company of Brooks' husband, a fellow old Eatonian.

DAVID CAMERON: I am very sorry to hear that Raisa is no longer with us. And I think I should probably conclude by saying I don't think I'll be getting back into the saddle anytime soon.

(SOUNDBITE OF A SONG)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: (Singing) Her name is Rebekah.

CHORUS: Rebekah.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: (Singing) And she rode the fastest police horse in the West.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

BARKER: Britain's political satirists haven't had this much fun since someone leaked untrue allegations that another conservative prime minister, John Major, tucked his shirt into his underpants.

STEVE BELL: Well, it is quite rarely that something so juicy falls into your lap like this.

BARKER: That's political cartoonist Steve Bell, talking to the BBC. Bell drew Rupert Murdoch riding Cameron horsey-style holding Brooks' severed head on his lap. But most damaging to Cameron's image, Bell says, isn't the Murdoch connection. It's the reminder that Cameron, who likes to paint himself as a regular guy, is actually from Britain's landed elite.

BELL: He knows how bad this sort of - the upper class-posh-bloke-on-a-horse is bad news for him.

BARKER: Sheila Gunn was john major's press secretary. Gunn calls this a perfect storm for the public psyche.

SHEILA GUNN: I mean, there's two things that seem to obsess the British even now, and that's class and animals.

BARKER: Her advice to conservative party operatives: impose radio silence. Do everything possible to starve this story of oxygen. Not likely, say British satirists.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: (Singing) There was talk of murder, cover-ups, and obstructing justice's course. But all the papers talked about was Rebekah's borrowed horse.

BARKER: And they say this could run longer even than John Major's underpants.

For NPR News, I'm Vicki Barker in London. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.