Amid a sweeping crackdown on dissent in Egypt, security forces have forcibly disappeared hundreds of people since the beginning of 2015, according to a new report from Amnesty International.

It's an "unprecedented spike," the group says, with an average of three or four people disappeared every day.

The Republican Party, as it prepares for its convention next week has checked off item No. 1 on its housekeeping list — drafting a party platform. The document reflects the conservative views of its authors, many of whom are party activists. So don't look for any concessions to changing views among the broader public on key social issues.

Many public figures who took to Twitter and Facebook following the murder of five police officers in Dallas have faced public blowback and, in some cases, found their employers less than forgiving about inflammatory and sometimes hateful online comments.

As Venezuela unravels — with shortages of food and medicine, as well as runaway inflation — President Nicolas Maduro is increasingly unpopular. But he's still holding onto power.

"The truth in Venezuela is there is real hunger. We are hungry," says a man who has invited me into his house in the northwestern city of Maracaibo, but doesn't want his name used for fear of reprisals by the government.

The wiry man paces angrily as he speaks. It wasn't always this way, he says, showing how loose his pants are now.

Ask a typical teenage girl about the latest slang and girl crushes and you might get answers like "spilling the tea" and Taylor Swift. But at the Girl Up Leadership Summit in Washington, D.C., the answers were "intersectional feminism" — the idea that there's no one-size-fits-all definition of feminism — and U.N. climate chief Christiana Figueres.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Arizona Hispanics Poised To Swing State Blue

2 hours ago
Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Editor's note: This report contains accounts of rape, violence and other disturbing events.

Sex trafficking wasn't a major concern in the early 1980s, when Beth Jacobs was a teenager. If you were a prostitute, the thinking went, it was your choice.

Jacobs thought that too, right up until she came to, on the lot of a dark truck stop one night. She says she had asked a friendly-seeming man for a ride home that afternoon.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Pages

The Movie Jesse Eisenberg Has 'Seen A Million Times'

Jun 15, 2013
Originally published on June 15, 2013 7:15 pm

The weekends on All Things Considered series Movies I've Seen A Million Times features filmmakers, actors, writers and directors talking about the movies that they never get tired of watching.

Actor Jesse Eisenberg's credits include the movies The Squid and the Whale, Zombieland, The Social Network and Now You See Me — currently in theaters. The movie he could watch a million times is the British film Submarine.


Interview Highlights

On when he first watched Submarine

"A year ago my agents told me that this director Richard Ayoade wanted me to be in a film he was going to make but that they didn't have a script yet, but that he just made this wonderful movie called Submarine. And I never watch movies, I haven't watched a movie in, like, 10 years, I just never watch movies, but I started watching it and I thought it was the most amazing thing I had ever seen. I watched it again right away, which is something that I never do, and I just now watch it all the time. I find it to be very comforting."

On why he finds the film so funny

"You know, in most comedies there's usually like three or four funny scenes and exposition to get you to those funny scenes. And this movie, there's never those moments. There's never a moment where you're feeling like this is a filler scene to get to the next one."

On why he loves the movie

"There's something about every moment in this movie that feels so sweet and fresh and never crass — even though the characters are saying things that are crass, it's just so surprisingly sweet."

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

On this show, we like to ask people who make and act in movies about the films they never get tired of watching. This week, the star of "The Social Network" shares the one that never gets old for him.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "STUCK ON THE PUZZLE")

JESSE EISENBERG: Hi, my name is Jesse Eisenberg. I am an actor. And the movie I have seen a million times - or if not a million times, maybe a dozen times - is a movie called "Submarine." It's directed by Richard Ayoade. The actors are Craig Roberts, Yasmin Page, Sally Hawkins, Noah Taylor.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "STUCK ON THE PUZZLE)

ALEX TURNER: (Singing) I'm not the kind of fool who's gonna sit and sing to you...

(SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE, "SUBMARINE")

CRAIG ROBERTS: (as Oliver Tate) Most people think of themselves as individuals, that there's no one on the planet like them. This thought motivates them to get out of bed, eat food and walk around like nothing's wrong.

EISENBERG: About a year ago, my agents told me that this director, Richard Ayoade, wanted me to be in a film he was going to make but that they didn't have a script yet, but that he'd just made this wonderful movie called "Submarine." And I never watch movies. I haven't watched a movie in, like, 10 years. I just never watch movies. But I started watching it, and I thought it was like the most amazing thing I'd ever seen. I watched it again right away, which is something I never do. And I just now watch it all the time.

(SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE, "SUBMARINE")

ROBERTS: (as Oliver Tate) I don't know if I've come of age, but I'm certainly older now.

EISENBERG: I find it to be very comforting. And the movie as a whole is really wonderful, but what I love about it even more is that each individual moment seem so special.

(SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE, "SUBMARINE")

ROBERTS: (as Oliver Tate) Jordana Bevan's only real flaws are sporadic bouts of eczema.

EISENBERG: The most uninteresting thing about the movie is its description, which is just 15-year-old kid, you know, wanting to kind of lose his virginity and date a girl...

(SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE, "SUBMARINE")

ROBERTS: (as Oliver Tate) She's moderately unpopular, which makes a romance between the two of us more likely. She's also a girl. To be seen with her would improve my street cred, which, though high, could be higher.

EISENBERG: ...and keep his parents' marriage together.

(SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE, "SUBMARINE")

ROBERTS: (as Oliver Tate) My parents have not had sex in seven months. I've been monitoring their intimacy by the dimmer switch in their bedroom. I know when they've been at it because the next morning the dial would be set to halfway.

EISENBERG: Sounds like I'm describing 1,000 different movies. But this one is unlike any of those. It has its own aesthetic and its own story to tell. And it's as real and original as anything else.

(SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE, "SUBMARINE")

ROBERTS: (as Oliver Tate) I wish life could be more like American soap operas. Then, whenever things got dramatic, you could just fade the picture down and pick things up again later.

EISENBERG: Every scene is so wonderful. It's not like the kind of movie where, you know, you kind of tap your friend when you're watching it, like, oh wait, no. Just quiet down. This is the good part. You know, in most comedies, there's usually like three or four funny scenes and then exposition to get you to those funny scenes. And this movie, there is never those moments. There's never a moment where you're feeling like this is a filler scene to get to the next one.

(SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE, "SUBMARINE")

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: (as Character) This is about dipping your wick. You've done that. Game over.

EISENBERG: There's this great scene that's just - these three kids are walking down the hall, and one of the kids is kind of crass and he's telling the main character that he's got to break up with the girlfriend because they already had sex and why is he dealing with her emotional - in her life.

(SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE, "SUBMARINE")

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: (as Character) God, you're lame. Do you actually (unintelligible)?

EISENBERG: There's something about every moment in this movie that feels so sweet and fresh and never crass. Even though the characters are saying things that are crass, it's just so surprisingly sweet.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "PILEDRIVER WALTZ")

TURNER: (Singing) I etched the face of a stopwatch...

LYDEN: That's actor Jesse Eisenberg talking about the movie he could watch a million times, "Submarine." Eisenberg's new film, "Now You See Me," is out now. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.