Presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton was in Springfield, Ill., Wednesday where she sought to use the symbolism of a historic landmark to draw parallels to a present-day America that is in need of repairing deepening racial and cultural divides.

The Old State Capitol — where Abraham Lincoln delivered his famous "A house divided" speech in 1858 warning against the ills of slavery and where Barack Obama launched his presidential bid in 2007 — served as the backdrop for Clinton as she spoke of how "America's long struggle with race is far from finished."

Episode 711: Hooked on Heroin

1 hour ago

When we meet the heroin dealer called Bone, he has just shot up. He has a lot to say anyway. He tells us about his career--it pretty much tracks the evolution of drug use in America these past ten years or so. He tells us about his rough past. And he tells us about how he died a week ago. He overdosed on his own supply and his friend took his body to the emergency room, then left.

New British Prime Minister Theresa May announced six members of her Cabinet Wednesday.

Amid a sweeping crackdown on dissent in Egypt, security forces have forcibly disappeared hundreds of people since the beginning of 2015, according to a new report from Amnesty International.

It's an "unprecedented spike," the group says, with an average of three or four people disappeared every day.

The Republican Party, as it prepares for its convention next week has checked off item No. 1 on its housekeeping list — drafting a party platform. The document reflects the conservative views of its authors, many of whom are party activists. So don't look for any concessions to changing views among the broader public on key social issues.

Many public figures who took to Twitter and Facebook following the murder of five police officers in Dallas have faced public blowback and, in some cases, found their employers less than forgiving about inflammatory and sometimes hateful online comments.

As Venezuela unravels — with shortages of food and medicine, as well as runaway inflation — President Nicolas Maduro is increasingly unpopular. But he's still holding onto power.

"The truth in Venezuela is there is real hunger. We are hungry," says a man who has invited me into his house in the northwestern city of Maracaibo, but doesn't want his name used for fear of reprisals by the government.

The wiry man paces angrily as he speaks. It wasn't always this way, he says, showing how loose his pants are now.

Ask a typical teenage girl about the latest slang and girl crushes and you might get answers like "spilling the tea" and Taylor Swift. But at the Girl Up Leadership Summit in Washington, D.C., the answers were "intersectional feminism" — the idea that there's no one-size-fits-all definition of feminism — and U.N. climate chief Christiana Figueres.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Arizona Hispanics Poised To Swing State Blue

5 hours ago
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Monday Morning Political Mix: Obamacare Site Hits Another Snag

Oct 28, 2013
Originally published on October 28, 2013 10:54 am

Good morning, fellow political junkies.

It's the last week of October. That means the administration has just a month to meet its self-imposed deadline to have the Affordable Care Act website running as efficiently as it and millions of Americans had originally envisioned.

But the first item in our Monday political mix of some of the more interesting tidbits that caught my eye this morning indicates why setting such a deadline might be easier than meeting it.

  • The part of the Affordable Care Act's star-crossed, back-office technology that was thought to be working well experienced problems Sunday reports Reuters' David Morgan and Sharon Begley.
  • President Obama apparently didn't know until this summer that the NSA was electronically eavesdropping on leaders of U.S. allies but ordered a halt to that spying once he learned of it, The Wall Street Journal's Siobhan Gorman and Adam Entous report.
  • Budget negotiations between the Democratic-controlled Senate and Republican-led House start this week with low expectations for the sides to reach any significant deficit-reduction agreement since they're so far apart on entitlement cuts and tax increases. The National Journal's Billy House compares the competing budget proposals.
  • Who knew? The Pentagon has a 92-year old futurist nicknamed "Yoda" who runs a Defense Department outfit whose value to the nation is hard for outsiders to determine because it's output is so classified. In a delicious Washington irony, it's difficult for budget cutters to assess the Office of Net Assessment. Yoda and his operations also have political support from big-name policymakers past and present, the Washington Post's Craig Whitlock reports.
  • More than half the economists surveyed by USA Today said the federal government's partial shutdown hurt economic growth to the point where they are significantly adjusting downward their economic growth forecasts for the next two quarters, report Paul Davidson and Barbara Hansen.
  • A year after Superstorm Sandy destroyed and damaged tens of thousands of coastal homes and businesses in New Jersey and New York, rebuilding is uneven, reports NPR's Joel Rose on Morning Edition. Meanwhile, the high costs of insurance and reconstruction have led to wealthier buyers snatching up properties that once belonged to middle class families, reports The Wall Street Journal's Josh Dawsey.
  • In polling is accurate, Democrat Bill de Blasio, an unabashed liberal, appears poised to win the New York City mayoral election by the widest margin for a non-incumbent since 1973 the New York Times' David W. Chen and Megan Thee-Brenan report.
  • Vice President Biden, political animal that he is, appears to be reveling in his key role in the effort to recruit Democrats to run for Congress, reports Politico's Edward-Isaac Dovere. Not only does Biden help the party in its uphill battle to retake the House but he gets to reenergize connections in states that could be important to him if he decides to run for president.
Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.