NPR Politics presents the Lunchbox List: our favorite campaign news and stories curated from NPR and around the Web in digestible bites (100 words or less!). Look for it every weekday afternoon from now until the conventions.

Convention Countdown

The Republican National Convention is in 4 days in Cleveland.

The Democratic National Convention is in 11 days in Philadelphia.

NASA has released the first picture of Jupiter taken since the Juno spacecraft went into orbit around the planet on July 4.

The picture was taken on July 10. Juno was 2.7 million miles from Jupiter at the time. The color image shows some of the atmospheric features of the planet, including the giant red spot. You can also see three of Jupiter's moons in the picture: Io, Europa and Ganymede.

The Senate is set to approve a bill intended to change the way police and health care workers treat people struggling with opioid addictions.

My husband and I once took great pleasure in preparing meals from scratch. We made pizza dough and sauce. We baked bread. We churned ice cream.

Then we became parents.

Now there are some weeks when pre-chopped veggies and a rotisserie chicken are the only things between us and five nights of Chipotle.

Parents are busy. For some of us, figuring out how to get dinner on the table is a daily struggle. So I reached out to food experts, parents and nutritionists for help. Here is some of their (and my) best advice for making weeknight meals happen.

"O Canada," the national anthem of our neighbors up north, comes in two official versions — English and French. They share a melody, but differ in meaning.

Let the record show: neither version of those lyrics contains the phrase "all lives matter."

But at the 2016 All-Star Game, the song got an unexpected edit.

At Petco Park in San Diego, one member of the Canadian singing group The Tenors — by himself, according to the other members of the group — revised the anthem.

School's out, and a lot of parents are getting through the long summer days with extra helpings of digital devices.

How should we feel about that?

Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she disparaged him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb political statements" about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Pages

Mob Attacks U.S. Embassy In Yemen As Clashes Spread Over Anti-Islam Film

Sep 13, 2012
Originally published on September 14, 2012 7:03 am

Update 8:21 ET. Two Slain Americans Identified:

Two of the security personnel who were killed Tuesday along with Ambassador Chris Stevens and Information Management Officer Sean Smith have been identified. They are Tyrone S. Woods and Glen A. Doherty, both security personnel who died helping protect their colleagues. Both men were former Navy SEALs, according to a statement from U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.

Here's more from the statement:

"Tyrone's friends and colleagues called him 'Rone,' and they relied on his courage and skill, honed over two decades as a Navy SEAL. In uniform, he served multiple tours in Iraq and Afghanistan. Since 2010, he protected American diplomatic personnel in dangerous posts from Central America to the Middle East. He had the hands of a healer as well as the arm of a warrior, earning distinction as a registered nurse and certified paramedic. All our hearts go out to Tyrone's wife Dorothy and his three sons, Tyrone Jr., Hunter, and Kai, who was born just a few months ago.

"We also grieve for Glen Doherty, called Bub, and his family: his father Bernard, his mother Barbara, his brother Gregory, and his sister Kathleen. Glen was also a former Navy SEAL and an experienced paramedic. And he put his life on the line many times, protecting Americans in Iraq, Afghanistan, and other hotspots. In the end, he died the way he lived – with selfless honor and unstinting valor."

Update 2:25 ET. Four In Custody:

NPR's Dina Temple-Raston says Libyan officials have informed the U.S. that four people are in custody in connection with the attack on the American consulate in Benghazi that killed Ambassador Chris Stevens and three other embassy staffers on Tuesday.

But U.S. officials have yet to interview the detainees, described as "militants" or to verify their involvement in the attack. She says it is also unclear whether those arrested are Libyans or foreigners.

Here's our earlier post:

Violence sparked by an anti-Islam film and video clip has spread from Libya and Egypt to Yemen today, with protesters in the capital Sanaa storming the U.S. Embassy compound.

Chanting "death to America," the Yemeni protesters broke through a security forces cordon and marched toward the embassy. The protesters reportedly got through the main gate but not into the embassy building itself.

Meanwhile, clashes continued near the U.S. embassy in Egypt, and a U.S. Marine anti-terrorist team has been dispatched to secure U.S. diplomatic facilities in Libya, where an attack earlier this week took the life of Ambassador Chris Stevens.

In Sanaa, protesters removed the embassy's sign on the outer wall and set tires ablaze, The Associated Press reports. Once inside the compound, they brought down the U.S. flag and burned it, the news agency says.

Iona Craig, a reporter from The Times of London who was outside the embassy in Yemen, told NPR that it initially appeared that security forces allowed the hundreds of protesters to break the cordon.

Once protesters got about 60 meters beyond the cordon, security forces fired warning shots with AK-47s and machine guns. "Then everybody ran in panic," she said.

Witnesses say security forces have since restored calm at the embassy. Yemeni news agencies report that U.S. embassy staff had already been evacuated by the time violence broke out.

The anti-Islam film The Innocence of Muslims, produced in the United States and seen mostly via a trailer posted on YouTube, is the proximate cause of the unrest.

On Thursday, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said the United States government had nothing to do with the "disgusting and reprehensible" film, which she called a cynical attempt to "denigrate a great religion and to provoke rage." However, Clinton emphasized that the U.S. would never stop Americans from expressing their views.

Authorities in Afghanistan have gone so far as to shutdown access to YouTube "indefinitely" to keep Afghans from seeing the film they say insults the Prophet Muhammad, according to NPR's Soraya Sarhadi Nelson in Kabul. Authorities hope blocking the website will help prevent outbreaks of the violence. But she says the Internet provider has yet to receive official notification of the request to block the website and that it is still accessible.

NPR's Leila Fadel, reporting from Cairo, says protesters there seemed to be less concerned about the film and more intent on provoking police, who were seen as a tool of oppression under the past autocratic regime of President Hosni Mubarak.

She says armored vehicles and riot police tried to disperse a crowd of a few hundred young men at the U.S. embassy compound there. Protesters were forced back into nearby Tahrir square and side streets by police using tear gas to disperse the crowd, Fadel says.

NPR's Tom Bowman reports that more than 50 U.S. Marines have arrived in Tripoli to take up security duties at the American embassy, which has been reduced to emergency staffing levels after the consulate in Benghazi was attacked by armed assailants, killing the ambassador and three other diplomatic staff.

He says diplomatic posts around the world have been asked to review security procedures.

A senior administration official says there was a recent security review for the American consulate in preparation for the anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, according to Bowman. But the official told reporters there was no indication of a heightened threat that would call for more security personnel.

UPDATE at 12:50 ET:

Attorney General Eric Holder, speaking today in Qatar, says the FBI has opened an investigation into the deaths of the ambassador and the three other embassy personnel in Benghazi.

In Egypt, NPR's Fadel reports that the political wing of the Muslim Brotherhood says "peaceful demonstration" against the film is the duty of all Egyptians - both Muslim and Christian. The party called on protesters to contain their anger.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.