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Minimum Sentence

Sep 12, 2013
Originally published on March 4, 2015 1:24 pm

Some people have a last name that is also a verb, so their full name forms a complete sentence--like George Burns and Stevie Nicks. (If you're one of these people, we salute you.) In this game, house musician Jonathan Coulton gives contestants clues about famous people whose names also tell a story--a very short story.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

And here we have our next two contestants, Lauren Fulton and Whitney Reynolds.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Whitney, I love your hobby: making nerdy cocktails.

WHITNEY REYNOLDS: I do indeed make nerdy cocktails.

EISENBERG: OK, we need some examples. What do you have?

REYNOLDS: I had a - when "Avengers" came out, I made a Dr. Banner, which was Old Tom gin and iced sleepy time tea.

(LAUGHTER)

REYNOLDS: And then of course there is the Incredible Hulk, which was jalapeno-infused tequila, cilantro-infused sugar syrup and lime juice with a little leaf of purple basil on top.

EISENBERG: Oh, that is beautiful.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Lauren, you love movies to the extent that you are getting married soon ,and you're having a theme for your wedding.

LAUREN FULTON: Yes, it's old Hollywood.

EISENBERG: Gorgeous. What's your cocktail?

FULTON: Whatever makes you happiest.

REYNOLDS: Ask me later.

EISENBERG: Yeah, Whitney's going to tell you. She's working on it as we speak. Jonathan, what is our next game?

JONATHAN COULTON: Well, this game is titled Minimum Sentence. We're going to explore famous people whose names form a complete sentence because their last name sounds like a verb. So Mary, will you give us an example of that?

MARY TOBLER: Sure, if he's not careful with where he points his signature cigar, this is what the old vaudeville comic might do to his wife Gracie, and the answer would be George Burns.

COULTON: Right, that's a sentence and also a terrible, terrible image.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: I like it when our examples are super dark.

COULTON: Say goodnight, Gracie.

(LAUGHTER)

COULTON: So contestants, remember every answer will be a famous name that sounds like a complete sentence. Are you ready?

FULTON: Yes.

COULTON: OK. Instead of taking the bus, this is what a civil rights icon does with her car when she reaches her destination.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

COULTON: Whitney.

REYNOLDS: Rosa Parks.

COULTON: That's right, Rosa Parks.

(APPLAUSE)

COULTON: This is what one of the members of Fleetwood Mac does if she shaves her legs with reckless abandon.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

COULTON: Lauren.

FULTON: Stevie Nicks.

COULTON: You got it.

(LAUGHTER)

(APPLAUSE)

COULTON: The half-Windsor, the foreign hand and the prat are three examples of what the actor who portrayed Deputy Barney Fife does to neckties.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

COULTON: Whitney.

REYNOLDS: Don Knotts.

COULTON: Don Knotts, you got it.

(APPLAUSE)

COULTON: This is what the swimmer who won seven gold medals at the 1972 Olympic games in Munich does when he's finished savoring the chardonnay at a wine tasting.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

COULTON: Lauren.

FULTON: Mark Spitz.

COULTON: That's right, Mark Spitz.

(APPLAUSE)

COULTON: Otherwise Mark gets drunk.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: He drinks and swims like a fish, is that what you're trying to say?

COULTON: This is what Price Charles' wife does with the gals on league nights down at the local alley.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

COULTON: Whitney.

REYNOLDS: Camilla Parker Bowles.

COULTON: Yes, she does.

(APPLAUSE)

COULTON: This gravelly voiced singer and member of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame does this by the mailbox in expectation of his royalty checks.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

COULTON: Whitney.

REYNOLDS: Tom Waits.

COULTON: That's right.

(APPLAUSE)

COULTON: OK, this is your last clue. This is what the singer of "Oops, I Did It Again" does to vegetable and cubed meat when making shish kabobs.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

COULTON: Whitney.

REYNOLDS: Britney Spears.

COULTON: That's right, Britney Spears.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: That was a close game, but Whitney has finished first.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Congratulations, Whitney. Lauren, thank you so much. Whitney, you'll be moving on to your final round at the end of the show. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.