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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Mind In The Guttural

Sep 4, 2013
Originally published on March 4, 2015 1:12 pm

Get ready to give your mind and your mouth a workout. In this game led by host Ophira Eisenberg, all the answers have a guttural "ch" sound in them. For instance, the painter that had an eye for sunflowers but cut off his left earlobe is Vincent Van Gogh.

Plus, Jonathan Coulton concludes the game with a version of The Beatles' "Help!" that is also quite guttural.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

Let's get started with our first two contestants. And welcome Scott Bergeron and Sarah Brandt. Sarah, do you speak any other languages other than English?

SARAH BRANDT: I speak German and French and Arabic.

EISENBERG: Wow. Look at you. Did you speak these your whole life or did you go to school for them?

BRANDT: I went to school and I've also lived abroad.

EISENBERG: Oh. I think you're kind of bragging a little bit. But it's cool.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: I kind of grew up with them and I also live around the world is what you're saying. That's cool. Scott, you sell chemistry supplies. So I need to ask you: have you ever cooked meth in your underwear like on "Breaking Bad"?

(LAUGHTER)

SCOTT BERGERON: You would never want my meth. Ever. I'm actually a bad chemist.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: I don't know for sure but I'm pretty sure that bad meth is just as good as any meth. Our first game is called Mind in the Guttural. For this round, we're going to challenge both your mind and your mouth by asking for answers that have that guttural ch sound in them. Art, can you give us an example?

ART CHUNG: Sure. If we said this painter had an eye for sunflowers but cut off his left ear lobe, you'd say Vincent Van Gogh. Van Gogh.

EISENBERG: Van Gogh. If you heard that a lot of times, people saying that to you, you would probably cut off your ear.

CHUNG: You'd go crazy.

EISENBERG: You'd be like we're done with us.

CHUNG: Yeah.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: And the winner of this round will move on to our Ask Me One More final round at the end of the show. It's the possibly mythical beast in Scotland that is incredibly good at hiding.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Scott.

BERGERON: Loch-ch Ness Monster?

EISENBERG: Yes, that is correct.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: You wanted to say Loch Ness Monster, right, and then you remembered the game and you're like I've really got to push this. Yeah. A braided bread traditionally eaten on the Sabbath though it's good on any day.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Sarah.

BRANDT: Ch-challah.

EISENBERG: Challah is right.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: He succeeded Stalin as secretary of the Communist Party in the Soviet Union and he was not above banging his shoe on his desk to get his point across.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Scott.

BERGERON: Brezhnev?

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: I'm sorry; that is incorrect. Sarah, can you steal?

BRANDT: It's on the tip of my tongue but I don't think I can.

EISENBERG: No? OK.

CHUNG: The answer was Nikita Khrushchev.

EISENBERG: All right. Whatever. Let it go at that. Inspired by a lion from a Mel Brooks film "The Producers," it's the seventh studio album by the concisely named rock band U2. Art, do you want to give a hint?

CHUNG: It was my nickname in college.

(LAUGHTER)

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Scott.

BERGERON: "Achtung, Baby!"?

EISENBERG: Yes. That is right.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: It's Yiddish for cojones.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

BRANDT: Chutzpah.

EISENBERG: Sarah with chutzpah. That is correct.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: I would've also accepted matzo balls.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: This German playwright wrote the book and lyrics to the "Three Penny Opera" including the song "Mac the Knife."

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Sarah.

BRANDT: Is it Brecht?

EISENBERG: It is Brecht.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: I knew that that was the answer but the way you said it had so much - like you couldn't believe that you were saying it that I actually had to look at the answer again. I was like I don't know anymore. But, yeah, you nailed it. With a name that means Valley of the Dear in Gaelic and a deer on the label, this three syllable single malt whiskey can be yours for a dear price. Sarah's just laughing. Just laughing.

CHUNG: It's the best selling single malt whiskey in the world and it's not Glenlivet.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Scott.

BERGERON: Glenfiddich?

EISENBERG: Yes. Exactly.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: This four-word German phrase made famous by John F. Kennedy could either mean that you're from the capital of Germany or you're a delicious jelly-filled donut.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Scott.

BERGERON: Ich bin ein Berliner?

EISENBERG: Yes. Exactly.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Art, how did our contestants do?

JONATHAN COULTON: It was a close game but Scott is our winner.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Congratulations, Scott. Thank you so much, Sarah. Scott will be moving on to our final round at the end of the show.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG)

COULTON: Chelp! I need somebody. Chelp! Not just anybody. Help. No, I need someone. Help. When I was younger, so much younger than today, never needed anybody's chelp in any way. But now these days are gone and I'm not so self-assured. Now I find I've changed my mind; I've opened up the door. Help me if you can. I'm feeling down. I do appreciate you being around. Help me get my feet back on the ground.

Won't you please, please help?

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Thank you, Jonathan Coulton.

COULTON: You're welcome.

EISENBERG: Chelp.

COULTON: You're wel-chome.

(LAUGHTER) Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.