Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to arbitration at the Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Donald Trump picked a military town — Virginia Beach, Va. — to give a speech Monday on how he would go about overhauling the Department of Veterans Affairs if elected.

He blamed the Obama administration for a string of scandals at the VA during the past two years, and claimed that his rival, Hillary Clinton, has downplayed the problems and won't fix them.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The season for blueberries used to be short. You'd find fresh berries in the store just during a couple of months in the middle of summer.

Now, though, it's always blueberry season somewhere. Blueberry production is booming. The berries are grown in Florida, North Carolina, New Jersey, Michigan and the Pacific Northwest — not to mention the southern hemisphere.

But in any one location, the season is still short. And this means that workers follow the blueberry harvest, never staying in one place for long.

Pages

Military Tuition Assistance Rules May Limit Options

Dec 15, 2011

Federal money for active duty students is particularly attractive to for-profit schools, which have been signing up members of the services in record numbers.

So, the Pentagon has developed new rules to ensure that service members are treated fairly when they use government money to attend college. Those rules are set to go into effect Jan. 1, but many of the nation's best-known schools say they cannot accept those requirements.

The dispute puts at risk millions of dollars in federal assistance.

At a hearing in September, Sen. Jim Webb (D-VA) said colleges need to provide more information, so these students know what kind of school they are attending, and whether they can succeed there.

"Total cost of program, transfer ability of credits, default rates, graduation rates, job placement rates upon graduation, are a few ways to ensure transparency," he said.

The Defense Department says, they've been listening, and they're cracking down.

Starting in January, schools will have to sign a special memorandum before they can receive what's known as "tuition assistance" for active military. Schools must charge military and civilian students the same tuition. They have to give students a clear education plan. And, they have to try to give students academic credit for some of their military training.

That last point raised eyebrows at places like the University of California, where Lawrence Pitts is provost.

"UC has a very careful process for reviewing courses taken outside of UC," Pitt says.

He cannot promise in advance that UC campuses will give credit for military training, as those schools want to review training courses one-by-one.

So, like other prestigious public and private universities says, UC will not sign that memorandum.

"If we did that on a regular basis we would have a number of students ill-prepared and not be able to take full advantage of university education at UC," Pitts says.

Many for profit schools, however, have signed up. They say this shows they are more in tune with the needs of non-traditional students, like those in the service.

Brian Moran of the Association of Private Sector Colleges and Universities says, his for-profit members are happy to recognize military training.

"It's something that we feel is important to these service members and we embrace seamless transferability of credit in recognition of the experience of active service military as well," Moran says.

The fact that military money might be headed to more for-profit schools is particularly annoying to people like Sen. Tom Harkin (D-IA). Harkin's committee has held hearings highlighting what he says are aggressive recruiting practices by for-profit schools, some targeting more than $500 million annually in tuition assistance.

"One has to ask why is it that all the good schools are not signing the memorandum of understanding, and all the bad actors are?" Harkin asks.

The Defense Department would not comment.

Military service groups have been outraged at the idea that students could not use their tuition assistance dollars at hundreds of recognized colleges. They've written to Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta, asking him to put these new rules on hold. They've been joined by 52 Senators from both parties.

Some colleges say, if the issue isn't resolved, they will try to find money elsewhere, so members of the military can stay in school.

Copyright 2011 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.