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NPR Politics presents the Lunchbox List: our favorite campaign news and stories curated from NPR and around the Web in digestible bites (100 words or less!). Look for it every weekday afternoon from now until the conventions.

Convention Countdown

The Republican National Convention is in 4 days in Cleveland.

The Democratic National Convention is in 11 days in Philadelphia.

NASA has released the first picture of Jupiter taken since the Juno spacecraft went into orbit around the planet on July 4.

The picture was taken on July 10. Juno was 2.7 million miles from Jupiter at the time. The color image shows some of the atmospheric features of the planet, including the giant red spot. You can also see three of Jupiter's moons in the picture: Io, Europa and Ganymede.

The Senate is set to approve a bill intended to change the way police and health care workers treat people struggling with opioid addictions.

My husband and I once took great pleasure in preparing meals from scratch. We made pizza dough and sauce. We baked bread. We churned ice cream.

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How should we feel about that?

Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

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Massachusetts Senate Race Gives New Meaning To Gender Politics

Oct 7, 2012
Originally published on October 9, 2012 1:24 pm

Despite its liberal reputation, the home of Jack Kennedy and Tip O'Neill has never elected a woman as governor or senator. And in Massachusetts Sen. Scott Brown's tight re-election race with Democratic challenger Elizabeth Warren, gender could prove the difference.

When Brown won his Senate seat in a special election in 2010, he came away unscathed by something his female opponent at the time would have had a much harder time explaining away. He posed nude for Cosmopolitan when he was 22 to help pay for law school.

About a year ago, Warren, who also went to law school and is now a Harvard Law professor, was asked how she financed her college education. She quipped: "I kept my clothes on!"

Days later, in an interview with Boston radio station WZLX, Brown had this response to Warren's comment: "Thank God."

That struck a nerve among women in the state.

They have seen Massachusetts consistently vote down women running for high political office. Neighboring New Hampshire is currently served by two women U.S. senators. Maine has two, as well. Connecticut has elected multiple women governors. But in Kennedy Country? Never.

Carol Hardy-Fanta of the University of Massachusetts says the state has an especially long tradition of politics as the path to wealth and influence.

"They say politics is a blood sport here — and it is everywhere, I mean, everybody wants power — but men are never going to give this up without a really big fight," she says.

Massachusetts is the lone state that tilted for dove George McGovern for president in 1972. It was the first state to legalize same-sex marriage. But Victoria Budson of Harvard's Kennedy School of Government says it's not as liberal as people might think.

"Massachusetts was founded by the Puritans," she says, "and some of that sense of Puritan propriety and norms and expected sets of behaviors has remained."

Warren has a shot at breaking some of those norms. In recent polls, she came out ahead of Brown among likely female voters. To try to chip away at that lead, Brown has been running several TV spots.

One declares that "Scott Brown is pro-choice, and he supports a women's right to choose." Other ads show him embracing his wife, who is a former TV reporter, or posing for the camera with his two daughters.

Some voters are uneasy watching gender play a role in the race. Boston retiree Mike Lloyd says stereotypes should not decide what could be a pivotal election nationally.

"It just doesn't influence me," he says. "I don't particularly care whether he's tall or handsome, or that she's not 25 and ravishingly beautiful."

Other voters, like Michelle Burrell, say gender does matter.

"Boston is full of majority men ... not ruling, but running the town. We need more women in the world putting a mark on this town," Burrell says.

Ten years ago, Shannon O'Brien lost the governor's race to a Republican man — Mitt Romney. She says this year's tight Senate race may be different.

"I was outspent three-and-a-half to one," O'Brien notes. "Elizabeth Warren, I think, has leveled that playing field. This should bode well for her chances to win in November."

And where is that money coming from? Ironically, in her bid to become the first female U.S. senator from Massachusetts, Warren has raised much of her campaign donations from out of state.

Copyright 2013 WBUR. To see more, visit http://www.wbur.org.

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Voters in New Hampshire's neighbor to the south, Massachusetts, may determine which party controls the U.S. Senate next year. Despite its liberal reputation, the home of Jack Kennedy and Tip O'Neill has never elected a woman as governor, or senator. And in the tight race between Massachusetts Republican Sen. Scott Brown and his Democratic challenger, Elizabeth Warren, gender could prove the difference. Curt Nickisch reports from member station WBUR, in Boston.

CURT NICKISCH, BYLINE: When Scott Brown won his Senate seat in a special election, in 2010, he was not hurt by something his female opponent would have had a harder time explaining away; that when he was 22, he posed nude for Cosmopolitan, to help pay for law school. Now, in his re-election race, his current challenger is also a woman. Elizabeth Warren was asked about Brown's education financing a year ago.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED BROADCAST)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: How did you pay for your college education?

ELIZABETH WARREN: I kept my clothes on.

(LAUGHTER)

NICKISCH: Warren went to law school, too. She's now a Harvard Law professor. Brown responded two days later, in an interview with Kevin Karlson of Boston radio station WZLX.

KEVIN KARLSON: Warren's comment about how she didn't take her clothes off...

(LAUGHTER)

SEN. SCOTT BROWN: Thank God.

(LAUGHTER)

KARLSON: That's what I said...

NICKISCH: Brown's response struck a nerve among women here. They've seen Massachusetts consistently vote down women running for high political office. Neighboring New Hampshire is currently served by two women U.S. senators. Maine has two as well. Connecticut has elected multiple women governors. But never one in "Kennedy Country." Carol Hardy-Fanta, of the University of Massachusetts, says this state has an especially long tradition of politics as the path to wealth and influence.

CAROL HARDY-FANTA: They say politics is a blood sport here - and it is everywhere. I mean, everybody wants power. But men are never going to give this up without a really big fight.

NICKISCH: Massachusetts is the lone state that tilted for dove George McGovern for president, in 1972. It's the first state to legalize same-sex marriage. But Victoria Budson, of Harvard's Kennedy School of Government, says this state is not as liberal as people think.

VICTORIA BUDSON: Massachusetts was founded by the Puritans. And some of that sense of Puritan propriety and norms, and expected sets of behaviors, has remained.

NICKISCH: Elizabeth Warren has a shot at breaking some of those norms. In recent polls, she leads Scott Brown among likely female voters. To try to chip away at Warren's lead among women, Scott Brown has been running TV spots.

(SOUNDBITE OF POLITICAL AD)

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: Scott Brown is pro-choice, and he supports a woman's right to choose...

NICKISCH: Other ads show him embracing his wife, a former TV reporter; or posing for the camera with his two daughters.

Some voters are uneasy watching gender play a role in the race. Boston retiree Mike Lloyd says stereotypes should not decide what could be a pivotal election nationally.

MIKE LLOYD: It just doesn't influence me. I don't particularly care whether he's tall or handsome, or that she's not 25 and ravishingly beautiful.

NICKISCH: But other voters, like Michelle Burrell, say gender does matter.

MICHELLE BURRELL: Boston is full of - majority men, I want to say; not ruling, but running, the town. We need more women in the world, putting a mark on this town.

NICKISCH: Ten years ago, Shannon O'Brien lost to a Republican man - the governor's office, to Mitt Romney. O'Brien says this year's tight Senate race here, may be different.

SHANNON O'BRIEN: I was outspent three and a half, to one. Elizabeth Warren, I think, has leveled that playing field. This should bode well for her chances to win, in November.

NICKISCH: And where is that money coming from? Ironically, in her bid to become the first female U.S. senator from Massachusetts, Warren has raised much of her campaign donations from out of state.

For NPR News, I'm Curt Nickisch in Boston. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.