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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Arizona Hispanics Poised To Swing State Blue

43 minutes ago
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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Edit note: This report contains accounts of rape, violence and other disturbing events.

Sex trafficking wasn't a major concern in the early 1980s, when Beth Jacobs was a teenager. If you were a prostitute, the thinking went, it was your choice.

Jacobs thought that too, right up until she came to on the lot of a dark truck stop one night. She says she had asked a friendly-seeming man for a ride home that afternoon.

Jacobs says he gave her something in an old McDonald's cup — a drug — and as she was waking up the man announced that he was a pimp. Her pimp.

The Boston Citgo sign, all 3,600 square LED feet of which has served as the backdrop to Red Sox games since 1965, is now officially a "pending landmark."

Spanish Surrealist Salvador Dalí spent much of the 1940s in the U.S., avoiding World War II and its aftermath. He was a well-known fixture on the art scene in Monterey, Calif. — and that's where the largest collection of Dalí's work on the West Coast is now open to the public.

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Lululemon's Product Chief To Depart; See-Through Pants Have Been A Problem

Apr 4, 2013
Originally published on April 4, 2013 12:03 pm

Two weeks after being embarrassed by the news that some of its yoga pants were way too sheer, there's word from Lululemon that chief product officer Sheree Waterson will be leaving the company April 15.

As The Wall Street Journal and other news outlets report, Waterson's departure wasn't tied directly to the problem with black "luon women's bottoms." The company said it's part of "a reorganization of our product organization." Lululemon CEO Christine Day said in a statement, "We appreciate the many contributions that Sheree made during her time with Lululemon, particularly in the area of design."

As for the problem with the pants, Lululemon says:

-- "After an evaluation of our previously disclosed black luon production issues we concluded that the current specification and testing protocols for the signature fabric luon that were developed in 2006 have not materially changed."

-- "The production of luon is a complex process with a number of different inputs. Fabric is the key factor and while the fabric involved may have met testing standards, it was on the low end of lululemon's tolerance scale and we have found that our testing protocols were incomplete for some of the variables in fabric characteristics."

-- "When combined with subtle style changes in pattern and differences, the resulting end product had an unacceptable level of sheerness."

The company also said Wednesday that it still believes its first-quarter sales took a hit because of the problem, and subsequent recall of the pants and refunds paid to customers. The impact: first-quarter sales of $333 million to $343 million, not the $350 million to $355 million that had been expected — making for a real blow to the bottom line.

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