Amid a sweeping crackdown on dissent in Egypt, security forces have forcibly disappeared hundreds of people since the beginning of 2015, according to a new report from Amnesty International.

It's an "unprecedented spike," the group says, with an average of three or four people disappeared every day.

The Republican Party, as it prepares for its convention next week has checked off item No. 1 on its housekeeping list — drafting a party platform. The document reflects the conservative views of its authors, many of whom are party activists. So don't look for any concessions to changing views among the broader public on key social issues.

Many public figures who took to Twitter and Facebook following the murder of five police officers in Dallas have faced public blowback and, in some cases, found their employers less than forgiving about inflammatory and sometimes hateful online comments.

As Venezuela unravels — with shortages of food and medicine, as well as runaway inflation — President Nicolas Maduro is increasingly unpopular. But he's still holding onto power.

"The truth in Venezuela is there is real hunger. We are hungry," says a man who has invited me into his house in the northwestern city of Maracaibo, but doesn't want his name used for fear of reprisals by the government.

The wiry man paces angrily as he speaks. It wasn't always this way, he says, showing how loose his pants are now.

Ask a typical teenage girl about the latest slang and girl crushes and you might get answers like "spilling the tea" and Taylor Swift. But at the Girl Up Leadership Summit in Washington, D.C., the answers were "intersectional feminism" — the idea that there's no one-size-fits-all definition of feminism — and U.N. climate chief Christiana Figueres.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Arizona Hispanics Poised To Swing State Blue

1 hour ago
Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Editor's note: This report contains accounts of rape, violence and other disturbing events.

Sex trafficking wasn't a major concern in the early 1980s, when Beth Jacobs was a teenager. If you were a prostitute, the thinking went, it was your choice.

Jacobs thought that too, right up until she came to, on the lot of a dark truck stop one night. She says she had asked a friendly-seeming man for a ride home that afternoon.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Pages

Let Them Eat Grass: Paris Employs Sheep As Eco-Mowers

May 27, 2013
Originally published on May 27, 2013 6:02 pm

City officials in Paris are experimenting with an unconventional way to keep urban lawns trimmed.

Agnes Masson used to be simply the director of the Paris city archives. Now, she's also a shepherdess of sorts, responsible for four black sheep munching the lush grass surrounding the gray archives building at the eastern edge of the city.

Masson says the ewes are efficient and easy to care for.

"We don't have to do anything — just look after them to see if the four of them are always together," Masson says. "They have to be all together; if one is out [of] the group, it seems she is a bit depressed."

The sheep are on loan from the city of Paris, which keeps livestock for agricultural schools. The sheep don't need gasoline, so they're ecological as well as cute to look at. The droppings from the sheep also encourage biodiversity by drawing insects, which in turn attract birds to the area.

The idea of swapping gas mowers for grazers is one that's catching on. Last year, the Louvre tried using two goats to mow the lawn at the Tuileries Garden in central Paris.

Sylvain Girard is head of logistics at an e-business warehouse. Last year, he started a second company called EcoMouton. Mouton means "sheep" in French.

"I put some sheep on my grass, just for my own pleasure at first," Girard says. "And then some customers were so happy to see [them] on my grass, they told me, 'Why don't you offer this for other firms?' Then I started, one year ago."

Girard now has hundreds of sheep rented to companies all over France, including the state electricity provider and carmaker Renault. Girard says his business has doubled and he's gone from four employees to 30. The only problem, he says, is finding shepherds. It's not as easy as just putting an ad in the paper.

"There are really few shepherds here in the suburbs of Paris," he says. "It's very hard ... because they disappeared. Nobody in France [is] creating this type of job. I'm the only one looking for shepherds."

The petite, four-legged lawnmowers are Ouessant sheep, from an island off Brittany, on France's west coast. Girard says the Ouessant breed is too small to be used for commercial meat or wool production and was becoming extinct. The lawn-mowing business offers them a new, economic life.

Girard says he's not sure, however, how well they'll work out in Paris with all the tourists. They may be cute, but they're not domestic animals and shouldn't be touched, he says. The rams can offer a playful, but painful, butt for those who come too close.

Arnaud Louche, an employee here, says having sheep cut the grass is an innovative idea that saves money. And, he says, we don't have to hear the noise of a lawnmower all spring and summer.

Even Jerome Duval, who used to cut the grass here, says he likes the sheep, as long as they don't put him out of a job.

But Girard says if that happens, he's still looking for shepherds.

Sometimes the sheep look like they're sleeping on the job. Girard says they have to sit down and ruminate every couple of hours. Still, this being France, I have to ask him if his sheep follow the 35-hour workweek.

"They ruminate, but they work," he says. "Seven days a week, more than 12 hours a day, and no ... unions."

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Well, now to a less serious policy initiative in a major international city. Paris is experimenting with an unconventional method of trimming its lawns.

NPR's Eleanor Beardsley explains.

(SOUNDBITE OF CONVERSATION)

ELEANOR BEARDSLEY, BYLINE: Agnes Masson used to be simply the director of the Paris city archives. Now she's also a shepherdess of sorts, responsible for four black sheep munching the lush grass surrounding the gray archives building at the eastern edge of the city. Masson says the ewes are efficient and easy to care for.

AGNES MASSON: We don't have to do anything. Just look after them to see if the four of them are all together - always together. They have to be all together.

BEARDSLEY: Why?

MASSON: If one is out the group, it seems she is a bit depressed.

(LAUGHTER)

BEARDSLEY: The sheep are on loan from the city of Paris, which keeps livestock for agricultural schools. The sheep don't need gasoline, so they're ecological as well as cute to look at. The sheep's droppings encourage biodiversity by drawing insects, which in turn attract birds to the area. The idea of swapping gas mowers for grazers is one that's catching on. Last year, the Louvre tried using two goats to mow the lawn at the Tuillerie Gardens in central Paris.

(SOUNDBITE OF MACHINERY)

BEARDSLEY: Sylvain Girard is head of logistics at an e-business warehouse. Last year, he started a second company called EcoMouton. Mouton means sheep in French.

SYLVAIN GIRARD: I put some sheeps on my grass just for my own pleasure at first. And then some customers were so happy to see some sheeps on my grass, they told me, why don't you offer this for other firms. Then I started one year ago.

(Foreign language spoken)

BEARDSLEY: Girard calls his sheep as he checks on a flock grazing the extensive grounds of a software firm outside of Paris. He now has hundreds of sheep rented to companies all over France, including the state electricity provider and carmaker Renault. Girard says his business has doubled and he's gone from four employees to 30. The only problem, he says, is finding shepherds.

GIRARD: There are really few shepherds here in the suburbs of Paris. It's very hard, very hard.

BEARDSLEY: You can't just put an ad in the paper looking for a shepherd?

GIRARD: We can. We can. But it stays very hard to find them because they disappeared. There are nobody more in France creating this type of jobs. I'm the only one looking for shepherds.

(SOUNDBITE OF SHEEP)

GIRARD: (Foreign language spoken)

BEARDSLEY: The petite, four-legged lawnmowers are Ouessant sheep, from an island off Brittany, on France's west coast. Girard says the Ouessant breed is too small to be used for commercial meat or wool production, and was becoming extinct. The lawn mowing business offers them a new, economic life. But Girard says he's not sure how well they'll work out in Paris with all the tourists.

They may be cute but they're not domestic animals and shouldn't be touched, he says. The rams can offer a playful, but painful, butt for those who come too close.

ARNAUD LOUCHE: (Foreign language spoken)

BEARDSLEY: Arnaud Louche, an employee here, says having sheep cut the grass is an innovative idea that saves money. And he says we don't have to hear the noise of a lawnmower all spring and summer.

JEROME DUVAL: (Foreign language spoken)

(LAUGHTER)

DUVAL: (Foreign language spoken)

BEARDSLEY: Even Jerome Duval, who used to cut the grass here, says he likes the sheep as long as they don't put him out of a job.

DUVAL: (Foreign language spoken)

BEARDSLEY: But Girard says, if that happens, he's looking for shepherds.

(LAUGHTER)

BEARDSLEY: Sometimes the sheep look like they're sleeping on the job. Girard says they have to sit down and ruminate every couple of hours. Still, this being France, I have to ask him.

Do your sheep follow the 35-hour workweek?

(LAUGHTER)

GIRARD: They ruminate, but they work seven days a week, more than 12 hours a day. And no syndicates.

BEARDSLEY: No unions.

GIRARD: No unions.

(LAUGHTER)

BEARDSLEY: Eleanor Beardsley, NPR News, Paris.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC) Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.