When the United Kingdom voted to leave the European Union last month, the seaside town of Port Talbot in Wales eagerly went along with the move. Brexit was approved by some 57 percent of the town's residents.

Now some of them are wondering if they made the wrong decision.

The June 23 Brexit vote has raised questions about the fate of the troubled Port Talbot Works, Britain's largest surviving steel plant — a huge, steam-belching facility that has long been the town's biggest employer.

Solar Impulse 2 has landed in Cairo, completing the penultimate leg of its attempt to circumnavigate the globe using only the power of the sun.

The trip over the Mediterranean included a breathtaking flyover of the Pyramids. Check it out:

President Obama is challenging Americans to have an honest and open-hearted conversation about race and law enforcement. But even as he sits down at the White House with police and civil rights activists, Obama is mindful of the limits of that approach.

"I've seen how inadequate words can be in bringing about lasting change," the president said Tuesday at a memorial service for five law officers killed last week in Dallas. "I've seen how inadequate my own words have been."

Mice watching Orson Welles movies may help scientists explain human consciousness.

At least that's one premise of the Allen Brain Observatory, which launched Wednesday and lets anyone with an Internet connection study a mouse brain as it responds to visual information.

The FBI says it is giving up on the D.B. Cooper investigation, 45 years after the mysterious hijacker parachuted into the night with $200,000 in a briefcase, becoming an instant folk figure.

"Following one of the longest and most exhaustive investigations in our history," the FBI's Ayn Dietrich-Williams said in a statement, "the FBI redirected resources allocated to the D.B. Cooper case in order to focus on other investigative priorities."

This is the first in a series of essays concerning our collective future. The goal is to bring forth some of the main issues humanity faces today, as we move forward to uncertain times. In an effort to be as thorough as possible, we will consider two kinds of threats: those due to natural disasters and those that are man-made. The idea is to expose some of the dangers and possible mechanisms that have been proposed to deal with these issues. My intention is not to offer a detailed analysis for each threat — but to invite reflection and, hopefully, action.

Alabama authorities say a home burglary suspect has died after police used a stun gun on the man.  Birmingham police say he resisted officers who found him in a house wrapped in what looked like material from the air conditioner duct work.  The Lewisburg Road homeowner called police Tuesday about glass breaking and someone yelling and growling in his basement.  Police reportedly entered the dwelling and used a stun gun several times on a white suspect before handcuffing him.  Investigators say the man was "extremely irritated" throughout and didn't obey verbal commands.

It can be hard to distinguish among the men wearing grey suits and regulation haircuts on Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington. But David Margolis always brought a splash of color.

It wasn't his lovably disheveled wardrobe, or his Elvis ring, but something else: the force of his flamboyant personality. Margolis, a graduate of Harvard Law School, didn't want to fit in with the crowd. He wanted to stand out.

Montgomery Education Foundation's Brain Forest Summer Learning Academy was spotlighted Wednesday at Carver High School.  The academic-enrichment program is for rising 4th, 5th, and 6th graders in the Montgomery Public School system.  Community Program Director Dillion Nettles, says the program aims to prevent learning loss during summer months.  To find out how your child can participate in next summer's program visit Montgomery-ed.org

A police officer is free on bond after being arrested following a rash of road-sign thefts in southeast Alabama.  Brantley Police Chief Titus Averett says officer Jeremy Ray Walker of Glenwood is on paid leave following his arrest in Pike County.  The 30-year-old Walker is charged with receiving stolen property.  Lt. Troy Johnson of the Pike County Sheriff's Office says an investigation began after someone reported that Walker was selling road signs from Crenshaw County.  Investigators contacted the county engineer and learned signs had been reported stolen from several roads.

Pages

'Let Mitt Be Mitt': But Who Was He?

Nov 9, 2012
Originally published on November 9, 2012 10:30 pm

The postmortems for Republican Mitt Romney's presidential campaign are rolling in.

There are many explanations for what went wrong — and there's some validity to each of them. The staff wasn't the best. The Republican Party has a demographics problem as growing minority populations favor Democrats.

One big challenge Romney faced: Americans want to like their president.

Almost everyone who knows Romney personally does like him. But that likable guy was hard to find on the campaign trail.

First Impressions

In the earliest days of the campaign, Romney visited the self-proclaimed ice cream capital of the world: Le Mars, Iowa. He talked about his plans for the United States and why he thought he should be the Republican presidential nominee.

But when it came time to talk about himself, Romney outsourced the job.

"Come on up here, Craig. Come say hi," Romney told his son. "Tell them something about your family, or about your dad, that they don't know."

Craig Romney told an odd story about a family triathlon. His father's opponent was a daughter-in-law who had just given birth to her second child.

"It was kind of in the home stretch in the run there, and she had a slight lead on him," Craig Romney recalled. "And he said that in that moment, he decided that he was going to win that race or he was going to die trying."

The crowd laughed nervously. The story was designed to show Romney as a guy who fights to the very end. Instead, he sounded kind of heartless.

Romney never liked talking about himself. He thought it was unseemly. Also, talking about himself meant talking about his Mormon religion. The campaign wasn't sure how voters would feel about that. So he talked about other things — like the economy, and President Obama.

That created an opening his rivals quickly filled.

Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich's team produced a video that talked about "a group of corporate raiders, led by Mitt Romney," who were "playing the system for a quick buck."

Texas Gov. Rick Perry coined a phrase that immediately sank its talons into the narrative when he said: "There is a real difference between a venture capitalist and a vulture capitalist."

And Romney?

His campaign did not go the standard route of producing biographical videos introducing the candidate to voters. It produced plenty of ads. But almost all of them were attacks on the other guys.

Attack ads may hurt their target, but they also hurt the person creating the message.

A portrait emerged of Romney as a coldhearted, severely conservative robber baron.

And that was before the Obama campaign even lifted a finger.

Spontaneity Squelched

In person, Romney could be warm and funny. One on one, he interacted with people naturally. But when the cameras turned on, that side of him disappeared. Aides complained that he became some kind of bizarre, awkward automaton.

One staffer joked with reporters that he should tell Romney a session was off the record but tell the press it was on the record, because if Romney knew he was being recorded, his genuine side would skitter away like a rabbit.

When Romney did speak off the cuff with cameras rolling, he often said things that came across as pandering, or out of touch.

In Mississippi, he opened a speech with: "I'm learning to say 'y'all' and I like grits — strange things are happening to me."

In Michigan, where he grew up, Romney should have been a natural. Instead he said things that made him sound like a visitor from another planet: "The trees are the right height. The streets are just right."

This created a feedback loop in the Romney campaign. His staffers realized that when they let him talk, he screwed up. So they cut back on the spontaneous interactions.

He rarely dropped by restaurants unannounced as other candidates do. He almost never talked to the press. This created fewer embarrassing remarks, sure. But there were also fewer opportunities for genuine, illuminating moments.

By the time the primaries ended, Romney's favorability ratings were in the gutter: 29 percent, according to pollster Andy Kohut of the Pew Research Center.

"Twenty-nine percent favorable is a pretty rough number for a person running for president of the United States," Kohut said.

'Let Mitt Be Mitt'

It wasn't until August that the campaign finally realized it had to change course. It created a moving, glossy, 10-minute video showing Romney with his kids and his wife.

"Probably the toughest time in my life," Romney said in the video, "was standing there with Ann as we hugged each other and the [multiple sclerosis] diagnosis came."

It was positioned to reach a huge audience. The plan was to show it on the climactic night of the Republican National Convention in Tampa, Fla. It was set to open the hour of the convention that peaked with Romney's acceptance speech.

But at the last minute, the campaign bumped the video to the previous hour, when none of the TV networks were tuned in. And in the slot where the video was originally scheduled to play?

Clint Eastwood spoke to an empty chair, imagining Obama sitting there.

This sad story did have a turnaround after the first presidential debate. Romney won hands down. And the campaign decided, in its words, to "let Mitt be Mitt."

Within days, he was telling personal stories on the trail — including one about a 14-year-old with leukemia whom he met through his church.

"It was clear he was not going to make it," Romney said. "And I went into his room one night when he was in bed, and he asked me a very difficult question. He said, 'Mitt, what's next?' — he called me 'Brother Romney' — 'What's next?' And I talked to him about what I believe is next."

That's what Americans wanted to hear, too. The Mitt Romney who sat down next to that teenager with leukemia had not sat down with the American voter until then.

A Turnaround Too Late?

It was just one month before the election. But it clicked. Tens of thousands of people showed up at rallies chanting his name: "MITT! MITT! MITT!"

On Election Day, Romney dropped by a campaign office near Cleveland.

Phyllis Froimsen, 81, giggled like a teenager at the chance to meet him. "I think he's very handsome. He really is — he's a good-looking guy," she said, adding that meeting him made her feel "like a million bucks!"

By the time people went to the polls this week, something remarkable had happened: Romney's favorability numbers had climbed to a tie with Obama's.

But it wasn't enough.

Likable people can still lose.

Months ago, in one of his more candid moments with reporters, Romney talked about the lessons that he'd learned from his father.

George Romney also ran for president unsuccessfully, more than 40 years ago. Mitt Romney said his father never dwelt on defeat. He didn't obsess or rehash what had gone wrong. His father let go, and moved on.

Mitt Romney was asked whether he shares that trait.

He replied with one word: "No."

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

People who follow Mitt Romney's presidential campaign are doing postmortems on a different kind of disaster. There are many explanations for what went wrong for Romney; some validity to each explanation. The staff, it is said, was not the best. The Republican Party has a demographic problem. Those growing minority populations favor Democrats.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This morning, we're going to look deeply at one, big challenge Mitt Romney faced. Americans want to like their president; and almost everyone who knows Mitt Romney personally, does like him. But that likeable guy was hard to find on the campaign trail. NPR's Ari Shapiro has been traveling with Romney from the beginning, and he has this final retrospective.

ARI SHAPIRO, BYLINE: In the earliest days of this campaign, Mitt Romney visited the self-proclaimed ice cream capital of the world: Le Mars, Iowa. He talked about his plans for the United States, and why he thought he should be the Republican presidential nominee. But when it came time to talk about himself, Mitt Romney outsourced the job.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED REMARKS)

MITT ROMNEY: Come on up here, Craig; come, and say hi. Tell them something about your family, or about your dad, that they don't know. My son Craig...

(APPLAUSE)

SHAPIRO: Craig Romney told an odd story, about a family triathlon. His father's opponent was a daughter-in-law who had just given birth to her second child.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED REMARKS)

CRAIG ROMNEY: And it was - kind of in the home stretch, in the run there, and she had a slight lead on him. And he said that in that moment, he decided he was going to win that race, or he was going to die trying.

(LAUGHTER)

SHAPIRO: The crowd laughed nervously. This story was designed to show Romney as a guy who fights to the very end. Instead, he sounded kind of heartless.

Mitt Romney never liked talking about himself. He thought it was unseemly. Also, talking about himself meant talking about his Mormon religion, and the campaign wasn't sure how voters would feel about that. So he talked about other things - like the economy, and President Obama. That created an opening that his rivals quickly filled.

(SOUNDBITE OF GOP PRIMARY POLITICAL AD)

UNIDENTIFIED ANNOUNCER #1: A story of greed - playing the system for a quick buck; a group of corporate raiders, led by Mitt Romney.

SHAPIRO: That video was not produced by the Obama campaign. It was from former House Speaker Newt Gingrich's team. Texas Gov. Rick Perry coined a phrase that immediately sank its talons into the narrative.

(SOUNDBITE OF GOP PRIMARY SPEECH)

GOV. RICK PERRY: There is a real difference between a venture capitalist and a vulture capitalist.

SHAPIRO: And Romney? Well, his campaign didn't go the standard route of producing biographical videos introducing the candidate to voters. They produced plenty of ads, but almost all of them were attacks on the other guys.

(SOUNDBITE OF GOP PRIMARY POLITICAL AD)

UNIDENTIFIED ANNOUNCER #2: Newt Gingrich supports amnesty for millions of illegals. Rick Perry not only supports amnesty, but gave illegals in-state tuition. Gingrich...

SHAPIRO: Attack ads may hurt their target, but they also hurt the person creating the message. A portrait emerged of Romney as a cold-hearted, severely conservative robber baron. And that was before the Obama campaign even lifted a finger.

In person, Romney could be warm and funny. One-on-one, he interacted with people naturally. But when the cameras turned on, that side of him disappeared. Aides complained that he became some kind of bizarre, awkward automaton. One staffer joked with reporters, that he should tell Mitt Romney a session was off the record; but tell the press it was on the record because if Romney knew he was being recorded, his genuine side would skitter away like a rabbit. When Romney did speak off the cuff, with cameras rolling, he often said things that came across as pandering, or out of touch. In Mississippi, he opened a speech with this...

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED STUMP SPEECH)

M. ROMNEY: I'm learning to say y'all, and ...

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: There you go.

M. ROMNEY: ...and I like grits. And things - strange things are happening to me.

SHAPIRO: In Michigan, where he grew up, Romney should have been a natural. Instead, he said things that made him sound like a visitor from another planet...

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED STUMP SPEECH)

M. ROMNEY: You know, the trees are the right height...

(APPLAUSE)

ROMNEY: ...the streets are just right.

SHAPIRO: This created a feedback loop in the Romney campaign. His staffers realized that when they let him talk, he screwed up. So they cut way back on the spontaneous interactions. He rarely dropped by restaurants unannounced, as other candidates do. He almost never talked to the press. This created fewer embarrassing remarks, sure. But there were also fewer opportunities for genuine, illuminating moments. By the time the primaries ended, Romney's favorability ratings were in the gutter - 29 percent, according to pollster Andy Kohut, of Pew.

ANDY KOHUT: Twenty-nine percent favorable is a pretty rough number, for a person running for president of the United States.

SHAPIRO: It wasn't until August that the campaign finally realized they had to change course. They created a moving, glossy, 10-minute video showing Romney with his kids, and his wife.

(SOUNDBITE OF ROMNEY CAMPAIGN VIDEO)

ANN ROMNEY: When I was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, both of us just dissolved in tears.

M. ROMNEY: Probably the toughest time in my life, was standing there with Ann as we hugged each other, and the diagnosis came.

SHAPIRO: It was positioned to reach a huge audience. The plan was to show it on the climactic night of the Republican National Convention, in Tampa. It was set to open the hour of the convention that peaked with Romney's acceptance speech. But at the last minute, the campaign bumped the video to the previous hour, when none of the TV networks were tuned in. And in the slot where the video was originally scheduled to play? Clint Eastwood spoke to an empty chair, imagining President Obama sitting there.

(SOUNDBITE OF GOP CONVENTION SPEECH)

CLINT EASTWOOD: What do you want me to tell Romney? I can't tell him to do that. He can't do that to himself.

(LAUGHTER)

SHAPIRO: This sad story did have a turnaround - after the first presidential debate. Romney won, hands down, and the campaign decided - in their words - to let Mitt be Mitt. Within days, he was telling personal stories on the trail; like this, one about a 14-year-old with leukemia, who he met through his church.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED STUMP SPEECH)

M. ROMNEY: It was clear, he was not going to make it. And I went into his room one night, when he was in bed, and he asked me a very difficult question. He said, Mitt, what's next? He called me Brother Romney - what's next? And I talked to him about what I believe is next.

SHAPIRO: That's what Americans wanted to hear, too. The Mitt Romney who sat down next to that teenager with leukemia; had not sat down with the American voter, until then. It was just one month before the election, but it clicked. Tens of thousands of people showed up at rallies, chanting his name.

(SOUNDBITE OF CAMPAIGN RALLY)

UNIDENTIFIED SUPPORTERS: Mitt! Mitt! Mitt! Mitt! Mitt...

M. ROMNEY: Thank you.

UNIDENTIFIED SUPPORTERS: Mitt! Mitt! Mitt! Mitt...

M. ROMNEY: Thank you. Thank you.

(CHEERS)

SHAPIRO: On Election Day, Romney dropped by a campaign office near Cleveland.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: Good luck.

M. ROMNEY: Hi...thank you...

SHAPIRO: Eighty-one-year-old Phyllis Froimsen giggled like a teenager, at the chance to meet him.

PHYLLIS FROIMSEN: I think he's very handsome. (LAUGHTER) He really is. He's a good-looking guy.

SHAPIRO: OK, so you just met him. How does it feel?

FROIMSEN: I feel like a million bucks. (LAUGHTER)

SHAPIRO: By the time people went to the polls this week, something remarkable had happened. Romney's favorability numbers had climbed to a tie with President Obama's. But it wasn't enough. Likeable people can still lose. Months ago, in one of his more candid moments with reporters, Mitt Romney talked about the lessons he'd learned from his father. George Romney also ran for president, unsuccessfully, more than 40 years ago. Mitt Romney said his father never dwelled on defeat; didn't obsess, or rehash what had gone wrong. His father let go, and moved on. Mitt Romney was asked whether he shares that trait, and replied with one word: No.

Ari Shapiro, NPR News, Boston.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC) Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.