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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Donald Trump picked a military town — Virginia Beach, Va. — to give a speech Monday on how he would go about overhauling the Department of Veterans Affairs if elected.

He blamed the Obama administration for a string of scandals at the VA during the past two years, and claimed that his rival, Hillary Clinton, has downplayed the problems and won't fix them.

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The season for blueberries used to be short. You'd find fresh berries in the store just during a couple of months in the middle of summer.

Now, though, it's always blueberry season somewhere. Blueberry production is booming. The berries are grown in Florida, North Carolina, New Jersey, Michigan and the Pacific Northwest — not to mention the southern hemisphere.

But in any one location, the season is still short. And this means that workers follow the blueberry harvest, never staying in one place for long.

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Legendary Football Coach Joe Paterno Mourned

Jan 22, 2012

Outside Penn State's football stadium, mourners paid respects to legendary football coach Joe Paterno who died Sunday from lung cancer.

All day cars drove slowly past a bronze statue of Paterno, who coached Penn State's football team for 61 years until he was forced out last November, a casualty of a child sex abuse scandal at the school. Many stopped and quietly walked up to the statue to pay respects to the man they called "JoePa." Among them 1991 Penn State graduate Kristen Vanderbush. Shivering and with tears running down her face, she read a quote by Paterno that's on the wall behind the statue.

"'They asked what I'd written about me when I'm gone. I hope they write, I made Penn State a better place. Not that I was just a good football coach,'" she said. "And that's exactly what he did. And to be able to have a statement like that and to fulfill it, that's quite a legacy."

Vanderbush left a handwritten note for Paterno. Nearby, third-generation Penn State graduate Dave Young brought his 6-year-old son along. On the growing display of hats, flags, flowers and candles, they laid a pair of blue gloves. Young says he wore them to Paterno's final home game, against Illinois, in October.

"I had a random pair of Penn State gloves that day that I found in my drawer," he said. "They were pretty terrible gloves. I was freezing, but it was a memory from that day. It was snowy. It was awful."

Young says he fondly remembers Saturdays with his dad watching Paterno coach football games. The recent scandal added a few bad memories. Still, Young hopes the focus will turn to Paterno's effort to boost the role of academics in college sports.

"I was in many classes with football players and they would sit in the front row — every class, they would answer questions, hands were up, they were engaged," he said. "And I think that is Joe Paterno's mentality — football is a benefit of coming to school here. It's not what you're here for. You're here to become a better educated person — a better person in the long run."

A final confirmation of Paterno's educational legacy came in December. The New America Foundation think tank ranked Penn State's football team first in academics among the top 25 teams in the country.

As a child sex abuse scandal unfolded at Penn State in November, Paterno was mostly silent. Just after he was fired, his family announced he was being treated for lung cancer. Last week Paterno talked with the Washington Post, which released scratchy recordings of those conversations on Sunday.

"The good Lord's got a reason," he says in the recordings. "You know, I'm not as concerned about me. What's happened to me has been great, got five great kids, 17 grandchildren."

That outlook on life is one reason people like Penn State senior Zachary Robinson came out to the Paterno statue.

"There's lots of people gathered here, taking pictures, leaving candles and flowers and signs for JoePa. Just trying to show their love for him," he said.

The hospital where Paterno was being treated says he died just before 9:30 a.m. Doctors say the cause was lung cancer. He was 85 years old.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.