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Arizona Hispanics Poised To Swing State Blue

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Editor's note: This report contains accounts of rape, violence and other disturbing events.

Sex trafficking wasn't a major concern in the early 1980s, when Beth Jacobs was a teenager. If you were a prostitute, the thinking went, it was your choice.

Jacobs thought that too, right up until she came to, on the lot of a dark truck stop one night. She says she had asked a friendly-seeming man for a ride home that afternoon.

The Boston Citgo sign, all 3,600 square LED feet of which has served as the backdrop to Red Sox games since 1965, is now officially a "pending landmark."

Spanish Surrealist Salvador Dalí spent much of the 1940s in the U.S., avoiding World War II and its aftermath. He was a well-known fixture on the art scene in Monterey, Calif. — and that's where the largest collection of Dalí's work on the West Coast is now open to the public.

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The Last Word In Business

May 2, 2013
Originally published on May 2, 2013 10:09 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Our last word in business today, is austerity at the French presidential palace.

President François Aland has already enacted several cost-cutting measures since being elected last year.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

He's cut a fleet of presidential and government cars and reduced ministerial salaries, and now he's raiding the wine cellars for which the presidential palace is famous.

MONTAGNE: The palace will auction off 1,200 bottles of its finest wines - some worth more than $3,000. It hopes to raise over $300,000. The proceeds will be reinvested in more modest wines for the presidential cellar. Clearly no self-respecting French president would have an empty wine cellar.

GREENE: That would never happen. After buying those cheaper wines, the money left over will go to the state budget. For the first two months of this year, France's budget deficit was $35 billion, so whatever money is saved with this wine decision, it'll really just be a drop in the bucket.

That's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

MONTAGNE: And I'm Renee Montagne. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.