New British Prime Minister Theresa May announced six members of her Cabinet Wednesday.

Amid a sweeping crackdown on dissent in Egypt, security forces have forcibly disappeared hundreds of people since the beginning of 2015, according to a new report from Amnesty International.

It's an "unprecedented spike," the group says, with an average of three or four people disappeared every day.

The Republican Party, as it prepares for its convention next week has checked off item No. 1 on its housekeeping list — drafting a party platform. The document reflects the conservative views of its authors, many of whom are party activists. So don't look for any concessions to changing views among the broader public on key social issues.

Many public figures who took to Twitter and Facebook following the murder of five police officers in Dallas have faced public blowback and, in some cases, found their employers less than forgiving about inflammatory and sometimes hateful online comments.

As Venezuela unravels — with shortages of food and medicine, as well as runaway inflation — President Nicolas Maduro is increasingly unpopular. But he's still holding onto power.

"The truth in Venezuela is there is real hunger. We are hungry," says a man who has invited me into his house in the northwestern city of Maracaibo, but doesn't want his name used for fear of reprisals by the government.

The wiry man paces angrily as he speaks. It wasn't always this way, he says, showing how loose his pants are now.

Ask a typical teenage girl about the latest slang and girl crushes and you might get answers like "spilling the tea" and Taylor Swift. But at the Girl Up Leadership Summit in Washington, D.C., the answers were "intersectional feminism" — the idea that there's no one-size-fits-all definition of feminism — and U.N. climate chief Christiana Figueres.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Pages

Kodak Reinvents Itself As Judge Approves Bankruptcy Exit

Aug 21, 2013
Originally published on August 22, 2013 1:54 pm

U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Allan Gropper has approved Kodak's plan to emerge from court oversight. That paves the way for it to be a much smaller company focused on commercial and packaging printing.

The plan received the judge's approval on Tuesday, and the company hopes to put it into effect as soon as Sept. 3, reports Kate O'Connell of member station WXXI in Rochester, N.Y.

Most of the old Kodak is gone, including the camera-making business. It was unable to keep up with the switch from film to digital technology.

These days, attention seems to be focused on cellphone cameras.

Kodak filed for bankruptcy protection last year after struggling with increasing competition and growing debt.

Since its filing, Kodak has sold off many of its businesses and patents while shutting down the camera manufacturing unit that first made it famous.

George Conboy, an analyst with Brighton Securities, tells NPR's Laura Sydell that the company's business plan submitted to the court does not include consumer photos.

"What Kodak makes now is equipment that will allow you to print labels that might go on, say, a juice bottle or something like that," he says.

In 2003, Kodak's revenue was more than $13 billion, but by 2011, it was down to $6 billion.

The court-approved plan affects creditors, retirees and shareholders.

"Existing stock would all be canceled out, and a whole new generation of shareholders, primarily a number of large financial institutions, would be the new owners of Kodak," says reporter Matt Daneman of the Democrat and Chronicle in Rochester.

Gropper says creditors will get about 4 cents on the dollar. Many former workers will lose retirement and health care benefits.

Kodak once employed 65,000 people in Rochester. Its new business will employ about 2,000 people.

The Associated Press reports that the U.S. Trustee filed an objection with the court challenging the legality of hefty cash and stock bonuses that Kodak executives are expected to receive when the company exits from bankruptcy protection.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And here's some other news in a snapshot. Kodak has gotten permission to emerge from bankruptcy. But as NPR's Laura Sydell reports, the company that once dominated the film and instant photo business is going to look very different.

LAURA SYDELL, BYLINE: For anyone who grew up before digital cameras, saying Kodak moment was shorthand for a sappy home photo. TV was filled with commercials like this one, of families going to weddings and graduations and taking pictures of it.

(SOUNDBITE OF KODAK AD)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Kodak film, for the times of your life.

SYDELL: But Kodak was never able to get an edge in the digital photo business. The home photo market became all about cell phone cameras.

In 2003, Kodak's revenue was over 13 billion. By 2011, it was down to 6 billion. And last year, Kodak declared bankruptcy.

GEORGE CONBOY: It's astonishing that that kind of resonance with consumers could practically evaporate in so brief a time.

SYDELL: George Conboy, an analyst with Brighton Securities, says Kodak was given permission to emerge from bankruptcy with a plan that doesn't really include consumer photos.

CONBOY: What Kodak makes now is equipment that will allow you to print labels that might go on, say, a juice bottle or something like that.

SYDELL: Kodak once employed 65,000 people in Rochester, New York. Its new business will employ about 2,000 people.

The upside, says Conboy, is that the death of the old business took so long that most of its skilled employees were able to find new jobs in the area.

Laura Sydell, NPR News. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.