Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Donald Trump picked a military town — Virginia Beach, Va. — to give a speech Monday on how he would go about overhauling the Department of Veterans Affairs if elected.

He blamed the Obama administration for a string of scandals at the VA during the past two years, and claimed that his rival, Hillary Clinton, has downplayed the problems and won't fix them.

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Kids Exposed To Meth In Womb Can Struggle With Behavior Problems

Mar 19, 2012

Children who are exposed to methamphetamine before birth can have behavior problems as young as age 3, a new study finds. But those problems are manageable, the researchers say, especially if the children and their parents get help early on.

"These kids are not cracked and broken," says Linda LaGasse, an associate professor of pediatrics and Brown University Medical School, and lead author of the study. "But they do have problems that are worthy of note."

This first study to track the health of meth-exposed children brings up memories of the "crack baby" stories of the early 1990s.

Back then, the newspapers were full of horror stories predicting that the crack cocaine epidemic would produce a generation of severely damaged children. Since then, it's become clear that while crack-exposed children do have differences in thinking and behavior, those differences are subtle in most cases.

This new study, researchers followed 166 children in the Midwest and West who had been exposed to the stimulant methamphetamine before birth. It then compared their behavior to that of similar children who hadn't been exposed to drugs.

The meth-exposed children were more likely to be emotionally reactive, anxious, and depressed at age 3. And they were also more likely to show aggressive behavior and symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity at age 5. That was especially true in children whose mothers were heavy users. Both groups of children acted like that at age 3, but kids who hadn't been exposed to drugs outgrew the behavior as they neared school age.

It's the first and only long-term study of the effects of prenatal meth exposure, LaGasse says. It was published in the journal Pediatrics.

The researchers tried hard to adjust for other issues in the family's life, including poverty, psychological problems in the mother, family instability and the mother's occupation. Those factors can have powerful effects on a child's behavior.

"A lot of times families that are involved illicit drugs have many other issues," LaGasse says. She also studies the effect of cocaine exposure on children. "These kids are vulnerable, and they get raised in vulnerable environments." The drug exposure becomes just one of the many difficulties that can cause long-term problems for a child. "It's important to recognize complexity," LaGasse told Shots. "It would be easy not to. But you can't do that here."

That children were anxious and depressed so young worries her, she says, because those children don't tend to get the attention of parents and teachers like the disruptive or impulsive children do. "These are the ones who are quiet. They may cry; they may be withdrawn." But those children risk having problems forming friendships and getting along in school because of their emotional reactivity, she says.

Identifying meth-exposed children early on would be a big help, she says, because it's much easier to correct behavior problems in preschoolers through parenting classes and other interventions than it is in older children. "This is a time when you can really make a difference in children's lives."

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