Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Donald Trump picked a military town — Virginia Beach, Va. — to give a speech Monday on how he would go about overhauling the Department of Veterans Affairs if elected.

He blamed the Obama administration for a string of scandals at the VA during the past two years, and claimed that his rival, Hillary Clinton, has downplayed the problems and won't fix them.

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Key Players In Federal Agency's Vegas Scandal Due At Hearing

Apr 16, 2012

At a sometimes heated hearing today where members of the House got to express outrage, the man at the center of the General Services Administration scandal refused to testify.

Jeff Neely is the regional official who was in charge of a 2010 conference in Las Vegas that has been flagged for excessive spending and waste and led to the resignation of GSA's top administrator and the dismissal of several others. And this morning he asserted his Fifth Amendment rights in declining to answer questions.

Martha Johnson, who stepped down as GSA administrator because of the scandal, said she had no idea until well after the fact that the conference "had evolved into a raucous, extravagant, arrogant, self congratulatory event that ultimately belittled federal workers." She again apologized to the nation.

We posted about the hearing before it began and updated this post while it was happening. Later, NPR's Carrie Johnson will be reporting about it for All Things Considered. Click here to find an NPR station that broadcasts or streams the show.

Our original post and earlier updates:

The regional commissioner who planned a lavish General Services Administration conference that was so "excessive and wasteful" that GSA's top administrator had to resign and several other officials lost their jobs is among those due at a 1:30 p.m. ET hearing being held by the House Committee on Oversight & Government Reform.

That regional official, Jeff Neely, is expected to invoke his right to remain silent.

The committee says it will be streaming the hearing here. This morning, committee chairman Rep. Darrell Issa (R-Calif.) complained on Fox News that while Neely has been put on administrative leave, he's still being paid.

Among others due at the witness table this afternoon are Martha Johnson, who resigned from her post as GSA's adminstrator (the agency's top job) just before a scathing report about the 2010 conference in Las Vegas was released from GSA's inspector general.

The agency, which manages the federal government's buildings and real estate, incurred "excessive pre-conference planning, catering, and other costs, as well as ... luxury accommodations" that were "incompatible with its obligation to be a responsible steward of the public's money," its inspector general concluded.

We'll keep an eye on the hearing and update this post with news from it later today.

Some examples of the excesses associated with the conference, attended by about 300 people:

— "$146,527.05 on catered food and beverages."

— Travel expenses for planning alone "totaled $100,405.37."

— "During scouting trips, GSA 'VIPs' were shown upgraded suites that they received as a perk for GSA contracting with the M Resort."

— "GSA spent $6,325 on commemorative coins 'rewarding' all conference participants."

— One "networking reception" along cost $31,208, or more than $100 per person.

— GSA spent in all, $686,247 on "travel, catering and vendors" during the four-day conference.

Issa's committee has been posting videos and other evidence of the waste inside GSA, including this "mashup."

Update at 3 p.m. ET. Possible Bribes And Kickbacks.

The latest Associated Press report on the hearing begins with this:

"The General Services Administration inspector general said Monday that he's investigating possible bribery and kickbacks in the agency, as a central figure in a GSA spending scandal asserted his right to remain silent at a congressional hearing.

"Inspector general Brian Miller, responding to a question at the hearing, said, 'We do have other ongoing investigations, including all sorts of improprieties, including bribes, including possible kickbacks.' "

Update at 2:45 p.m. ET. Concerns About Retaliation:

GSA Inspector Brian Miller just testified that during his investigation he ran across employees who were concerned about retaliation if they cooperated with him. One witness "was extremely afraid," he said, "that even in her new job she would experience retaliation."

Update at 2:04 p.m. ET. Neely Declines To Say Anything:

Asserting that he's been advised by his counsel not to answer any questions, Neely has declined to answer any questions from Issa — including whether he attended the conference and even whether he is currently employed by GSA.

He has also declined to answer a question about whether he would be willing to answer any questions.

In her opening statement, Johnson said she again apologizes for what happened and that "I will mourn for the rest of my life the loss of my employment" at GSA.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.