NASA has released the first picture of Jupiter taken since the Juno spacecraft went into orbit around the planet on July 4.

The picture was taken on July 10. Juno was 2.7 million miles from Jupiter at the time. The color image shows some of the atmospheric features of the planet, including the giant red spot. You can also see three of Jupiter's moons in the picture: Io, Europa and Ganymede.

The Senate is set to approve a bill intended to change the way police and health care workers treat people struggling with opioid addictions.

My husband and I once took great pleasure in preparing meals from scratch. We made pizza dough and sauce. We baked bread. We churned ice cream.

Then we became parents.

Now there are some weeks when pre-chopped veggies and a rotisserie chicken are the only things between us and five nights of Chipotle.

Parents are busy. For some of us, figuring out how to get dinner on the table is a daily struggle. So I reached out to food experts, parents and nutritionists for help. Here is some of their (and my) best advice for making weeknight meals happen.

"O Canada," the national anthem of our neighbors up north, comes in two official versions — English and French. They share a melody, but differ in meaning.

Let the record show: neither version of those lyrics contains the phrase "all lives matter."

But at the 2016 All-Star Game, the song got an unexpected edit.

At Petco Park in San Diego, one member of the Canadian singing group The Tenors — by himself, according to the other members of the group — revised the anthem.

School's out, and a lot of parents are getting through the long summer days with extra helpings of digital devices.

How should we feel about that?

Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she disparaged him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb political statements" about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

Pages

Kansas Republicans At War With Each Other

Aug 5, 2012
Originally published on August 5, 2012 5:22 pm

Moderate Republicans have come under attack in primaries across the country this year, but the split in the GOP is perhaps older and sharper in Kansas — and it comes to a head Tuesday.

"I think the lines have been drawn in the sand. Bridges have been burned. Everybody is all-in this election," says Jim Denning, one of the conservative candidates for the state's Senate.

The Republican statehouse primary is a savage fight fueled by money from the Koch brothers and labor unions, with big consequences for the citizens of Kansas.

When it comes to the political map, Kansas isn't just red, it's a stoplight. It's molten lava. Republicans hold every congressional seat, all the big statewide offices and both chambers of the legislature. But despite their lock on power, Kansas Republicans don't generally get along.

"We are our own worst enemy," says Tim Owens, who is a state senator – and struggling to stay that way.

Owens is waging one of the toughest campaigns in a 30-year political career. Today he's dispensing yard signs at a strip mall in his prosperous suburban Kansas City district — and examining some of the mail bombarding his constituents. One reads, "Obama sought a robot, and found one."

"And they've got Obama and me, which is absolutely ridiculous," Owen scoffs.

Owens is a lifelong Republican, so this is pretty scandalous stuff, and it's coming from his own party.

"The conservative element today is a far cry from what the conservative was when I was growing up," he says. "It's angry. It's hateful."

Denning is Owen's opponent.

"Being a conservative Republican, I'm not crazy, I'm not vicious," he says. "I'm a very reasonable human being."

Denning says moderates have stepped out of line. They've teamed up with the few Democrats in the state Senate to block stridently conservative legislation coming from the state House and the governor's office.

Jeff Melcher, who runs an IT firm called NetStandard, is vying for state Senate seat now held by a moderate.

"There is a party for people who want big government and high taxation, and that's the Democrat Party," he says. "And that's where a lot of the moderates belong."

These races are drawing big bucks, says Kris Kobach, Kansas' secretary of state. "It's coming from all different sources from in the state of Kansas and outside the state of Kansas."

Moderate Republicans have made common cause with of some of the state's biggest labor unions. Meantime, Wichita, Kan.-based Koch Industries, owned by the famously activist Koch Brothers, has been fueling conservative campaigns.

Burdett Loomis, a political science professor at the University of Kansas, says it's strange to see Gov. Sam Brownback working to dismantle powerful incumbents within his own party.

"To have this kind of absolutely brutal internecine warfare is certainly unprecedented," he says.

But it's not completely unexpected. Conservatives like Melcher want to change the way schools are funded, deepen budget cuts and eliminate state income taxes. He says he's sick of moderate Republicans standing in the way.

"The moderates have had their chance, and it was a failure," he says.

Pat Colloton is running against Melcher, to represent the 11th district in well-heeled Johnson County.

"Johnson County doesn't think we're failing," she says.

"The Johnson County businesses want to keep what we've got. We don't want to lose it to a completely different model," she says, the "grand ideological plan, speculative ideas of the Koch Brothers."

There is one thing moderate and conservative Republicans agree on: This election is one of the most important in state history. It looks like turnout, however, will be light on Tuesday, when perhaps only one-fifth of Republicans vote on the future of Kansas.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Moderate Republicans have come under attack in primaries across the country this year, but the split in the GOP is perhaps older and sharper in Kansas, and it comes to a head on Tuesday.

JIM DENNING: I think the lines have been drawn in the sand, bridges have been burned. Everybody is all-in on this election.

WERTHEIMER: That's Jim Denning, one of the conservative candidates for state senate. The Republican statehouse primary is a savage fight, fueled by money from the Koch brothers and labor unions with major consequences for the citizens of Kansas. Frank Morris of member station KCUR reports.

FRANK MORRIS, BYLINE: When it comes to the political map, Kansas isn't just red - it's a stoplight, it's molten lava. The Republicans hold every congressional seat, all the big statewide offices and both chambers of the legislature. But despite their lock on power, Kansas Republicans don't generally get along.

STATE SENATOR TIM OWENS: We are our own worst enemy.

MORRIS: Tim Owens is a state senator, struggling to stay that way.

OWENS: We've met the enemy and the enemy is us.

MORRIS: Owens is waging one of the toughest campaigns in his 30-year political career. Today, he's dispensing yard signs at a strip mall in his prosperous suburban Kansas City district.

OWENS: Five or six?

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Yeah, that'll be fine.

OWENS: Is that enough?

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Yeah, that'll be enough.

MORRIS: And examining some of the mailings bombarding his constituents.

OWENS: Oh, here's a couple of them there. Obama sought a robot and found one. And then they've got Obama and me, which is absolutely ridiculous.

MORRIS: Now, Owens a lifelong Republican, so this is pretty scandalous stuff, and it's coming from his own party.

OWENS: The conservative today is a far cry from what the conservative was when I was growing up. It's angry, it's hateful, it's anti.

DENNING: Being a conservative Republican, I'm not crazy. I'm not vicious. I'm a very reasonable human being.

MORRIS: That's Jim Denning, who's challenging Jim Owens. Denning says moderates have stepped way out of line. They've teamed up with the few Democrats in the state senate to block stridently conservative legislation coming from the state house and the governor's office.

JEFF MELCHER: There is a party for people who want big government and high taxation - that's the Democrat Party - and that's where a lot of the moderates belong.

MORRIS: That's Jeff Melcher, who runs an IT firm called Net Standard and is vying for a state senate seat now held by a moderate. Kris Kobach, the secretary of state in Kansas, says these races are drawing big bucks.

KRIS KOBACH: You know, it's coming from all different sources within the state of Kansas and outside of the state of Kansas. You have organizations, interest groups, unions, individuals.

MORRIS: Moderate Republicans have made common cause with some of the state's biggest labor unions. Meantime, Wichita-based Koch Industries, owned by the famously activist Koch brothers has been fueling conservative campaigns. And Burdett Loomis at the University of Kansas says it is strange to see Senator Sam Brownback working to dismantle power incumbents within his own party.

BURDETT LOOMIS: To have this kind of absolutely brutal internecine warfare is certainly unprecedented.

MORRIS: Though not completely unexpected. Conservatives like Melcher want to change the way schools are funded, deepen budget cuts and eliminate state income taxes. He says he's sick of moderate Republicans standing in the way.

MELCHER: The moderates have had their chance and it was a failure.

PAT COLLOTON: Johnson County doesn't think we're failing.

MORRIS: Pat Colloton's running against Melcher to represent the 11th Senate District in well-heeled Johnson County.

COLLOTON: The Johnson County businesses want to keep what we've got. We don't want to lose it to a completely different model, these grand ideological plans, speculative ideas of the Koch brothers.

MORRIS: There's one thing moderate and conservative Republicans in Kansas agree on: this election is going to be one of the most important in state history. Looks like turnout, however, will be a little light on Tuesday, when perhaps only one-fifth of registered Republicans vote on the future of Kansas. For NPR News, I'm Frank Morris in Kansas City. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.