New British Prime Minister Theresa May announced six members of her Cabinet Wednesday.

Amid a sweeping crackdown on dissent in Egypt, security forces have forcibly disappeared hundreds of people since the beginning of 2015, according to a new report from Amnesty International.

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The Republican Party, as it prepares for its convention next week has checked off item No. 1 on its housekeeping list — drafting a party platform. The document reflects the conservative views of its authors, many of whom are party activists. So don't look for any concessions to changing views among the broader public on key social issues.

Many public figures who took to Twitter and Facebook following the murder of five police officers in Dallas have faced public blowback and, in some cases, found their employers less than forgiving about inflammatory and sometimes hateful online comments.

As Venezuela unravels — with shortages of food and medicine, as well as runaway inflation — President Nicolas Maduro is increasingly unpopular. But he's still holding onto power.

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The wiry man paces angrily as he speaks. It wasn't always this way, he says, showing how loose his pants are now.

Ask a typical teenage girl about the latest slang and girl crushes and you might get answers like "spilling the tea" and Taylor Swift. But at the Girl Up Leadership Summit in Washington, D.C., the answers were "intersectional feminism" — the idea that there's no one-size-fits-all definition of feminism — and U.N. climate chief Christiana Figueres.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Israeli Soldiers Go 'Gangnam Style' With Palestinians; Incur Wrath

Aug 29, 2013

A group of Israeli soldiers who diverted their patrol into a dancehall earlier this week are facing their bosses' displeasure, after video captured the men — armed, wearing helmets and other gear — dancing with dozens of Palestinians in a club in Hebron. They were drawn into the building by hearing "Gangnam Style," the iconic dance hit song by South Korean rapper Psy.

A video of the event shows that at least twice, a soldier is hoisted on the partygoers' shoulders, drawing cheers from the crowd. In one sequence, he clasps hands with a man dancing next to him — who's also on someone's shoulders — all while keeping his assault rifle, a Tavor TAR-21, in his other hand. A video posted to YouTube says the Palestinians were celebrating a wedding.

As the video shows, dozens of young men cheered and held cameras and phones aloft, trying to capture the unlikely moment. We also note that the soldiers seem to have avoided the misstep of handing their weapons to others so they could dance.

In what could be called a rejection of "Gangnam Style" diplomacy, the Israeli Defense Forces has suspended the soldiers from duty in the elite Givati Brigade as it investigates.

Israel's Channel 2 TV, which first reported the incident, "said that the club was frequented by members of a Palestinian clan known for its pro-Hamas tendencies," according to Jerusalem Post.

"The Israeli military said on Thursday that it considers the incident serious, adding 'the soldiers exposed themselves to unnecessary danger and were disciplined accordingly,' without elaborating, The Guardian reports.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.