Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Donald Trump picked a military town — Virginia Beach, Va. — to give a speech Monday on how he would go about overhauling the Department of Veterans Affairs if elected.

He blamed the Obama administration for a string of scandals at the VA during the past two years, and claimed that his rival, Hillary Clinton, has downplayed the problems and won't fix them.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Iran Ups The Ante With More Nuclear Moves

Feb 15, 2012

Iran has unveiled significant developments on two important components of its nuclear program: the centrifuges used to enrich uranium and the uranium used to fuel a research reactor.

The country has made no secret of its work in these areas. But the news on Wednesday suggests that Iran may be making progress in its nuclear program.

Iran also announced that it is cutting off oil sales to several European nations, only to reverse itself hours later.

One of the developments involves a small nuclear reactor in Tehran — the Tehran Research Reactor — which was supplied to Iran in 1967 by the United States. It mainly produces nuclear isotopes used to treat cancer.

But it's been running out of fuel made from low-enriched uranium.

On Wednesday, Iran announced that for the first time it had produced the fuel plates that power that reactor. The news was expected, says David Albright, head of the Institute for Science and International Security in Washington.

"It's not a surprise that Iran can make a fuel element for the Tehran Research Reactor. It's been working on it for a couple years," he says.

But Iran did trumpet the development, as it's done numerous times in the past when it's claimed to have reached new levels of nuclear expertise. Often its claims have been premature.

Iranian President Visits Reactor

Iranian television showed President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad visiting the reactor. He used the occasion to dismiss once again the concerns of the U.S. and other nations that Iran is pursuing nuclear weapons.

They are always saying it's about an atom bomb, Ahmadinejad said, and it's always those nations that already have the atom bomb.

At the same time, Iran announced it installed new, more advanced centrifuges in its enrichment facility at Natanz. These centrifuges, if they operate properly, can enrich uranium much faster than the older models Iran has relied on previously. But there are questions about them as well, says Albright.

"The surprise has been that they didn't start enriching earlier. And there's been speculation that there's been some problems in those centrifuges," he says.

Both the reactor in Tehran and the enrichment facility at Natanz are due for inspections by the International Atomic Energy Agency, and there should be a new IAEA report on these developments by the end of February.

The Iranian media also announced Wednesday that Iran would cut off oil sales to six European nations, including France and Italy, in retaliation for the recent decision of the European Union to impose an embargo on Iranian oil.

But there was confusion later in the day, when Iran's Foreign Ministry announced there would be no cut off of oil sales to Europe.

This is all taking place amid a backdrop of growing tension between Iran and Israel. The Israeli government continues to talk about the possibility of airstrikes against Iran's nuclear facilities.

And in the murky shadow war between the two, Israel accused Iran of targeting Israeli diplomats for assassination this week in Georgia, India and possibly Thailand.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

I'm Melissa Block.

And we begin this hour with news out of Iran today. The government there announced that it is cutting off oil sales to several European nations. But just a few hours later, it seemed to reverse that decision.

SIEGEL: Also today, Iran claimed that it has made significant progress on two important components of its nuclear program. They involve the centrifuges used to enrich uranium, and the uranium used to fuel a research reactor. Iran has made no secret of its work in these areas, but the news suggests it may be making progress in its nuclear program. NPR's Mike Shuster has the story.

MIKE SHUSTER, BYLINE: There is a small nuclear reactor in Tehran. It's called the Tehran Research Reactor, and it was actually supplied to Iran in 1967 by the United States. Mainly what it does is produce nuclear isotopes used to treat cancer, but it's been running out of fuel made from low-enriched uranium.

Today, Iran announced that for the first time it has produced the fuel plates that power that reactor. The news was expected, says David Albright, head of the Institute for Science and International Security.

DAVID ALBRIGHT: It's not a surprise that Iran can make a fuel element for the Tehran Research Reactor. It's been working on it for a couple years.

SHUSTER: But Iran did trumpet this development, as it's done numerous times in the past when it's claimed to have reached new levels of nuclear expertise. Often its claims have been premature. Iranian television showed President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad visiting the reactor. He used the occasion to dismiss once again the concerns of the U.S. and other nations that Iran is pursuing nuclear weapons.

PRESIDENT MAHMOUD AHMADINEJAD: (Foreign language spoken)

SHUSTER: They are always saying it's about an atom bomb, Ahmadinejad said, and it's always those nations that already have the atom bomb. At the same time, Iran announced it installed new, more advanced centrifuges in its enrichment facility at Natanz. These centrifuges, if they operate properly, can enrich uranium much faster than the older models Iran has relied on until now, but there are questions about them as well, says David Albright.

ALBRIGHT: The surprise has been that they didn't start enriching earlier, and there's been speculation that there's been some problems in those centrifuges.

SHUSTER: Both the reactor in Tehran and the enrichment facility at Natanz are due for inspections by the International Atomic Energy Agency, and there should be a new IAEA report on these developments by the end of February. Iranian news media also announced today that Iran would cut off oil sales to six European nations, including France and Italy, in retaliation for the recent decision of the European Union to impose an embargo on Iranian oil. But there was confusion later in the day when Iran's foreign ministry announced there would be no cut off of oil sales to Europe.

All of this while tension grows between Iran and Israel. The Israeli government continues to talk of airstrikes against Iran's nuclear facilities. And in the murky shadow war between the two, Israel accused Iran of targeting Israeli diplomats for assassination this week in Georgia, India and possibly Thailand. Mike Shuster, NPR News. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.