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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to arbitration at the Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Donald Trump picked a military town — Virginia Beach, Va. — to give a speech Monday on how he would go about overhauling the Department of Veterans Affairs if elected.

He blamed the Obama administration for a string of scandals at the VA during the past two years, and claimed that his rival, Hillary Clinton, has downplayed the problems and won't fix them.

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The season for blueberries used to be short. You'd find fresh berries in the store just during a couple of months in the middle of summer.

Now, though, it's always blueberry season somewhere. Blueberry production is booming. The berries are grown in Florida, North Carolina, New Jersey, Michigan and the Pacific Northwest — not to mention the southern hemisphere.

But in any one location, the season is still short. And this means that workers follow the blueberry harvest, never staying in one place for long.

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Iowa Veterans For Paul Explain The Attraction

Dec 30, 2011
Originally published on January 2, 2012 6:25 am

A claim by Ron Paul's presidential campaign, and confirmed by the fact-check website PolitiFact, asserts that the Texas congressman has received more donations from active military personnel than the other GOP candidates combined.

That's intriguing, given that Paul is the only candidate calling for significant cuts in military (not defense, he says) funding, the closing of overseas bases, and the use of military force "very sparingly."

NPR photographer Becky Lettenberger and I headed to the Iowa State Fairgrounds this week to speak with members of the military attending Paul's "Salute to the Military."

Among the boisterous crowd of well over 500 people who gathered in the cavernous Knapp Learning Center to listen to Paul, we found an active military man and two veterans who told us why the candidate's military message resonated with them.

Army Staff Sgt. Abe Elam, 31, of Douds, who served two tours of duty in Iraq as a combat engineer, said he had never voted before 2007, when he started following Paul.

"His foreign policy is the only foreign policy that makes sense," Elam said. "If there's an immediate threat to our country, we'll deal with it."

Elam says his nonvoting days are over. "If I'm going to serve under a president and do their bidding, I'm going to make sure I've got a say in who becomes president," he said. "I respect [Paul's] love for the United States and his strong belief in the Constitution."

Ron Hurd, 57, of Urbandale, who served stateside in the Army from 1972 to 1975, said: "I don't think that we should be spending the kind of money we're spending overseas for military purposes. ... And Ron Paul is the only candidate really addressing the issue of taking care of our veterans."

Hurd, a registered Democrat who voted for Barack Obama in 2008, said he'll change his registration to Republican on caucus night next Tuesday to vote for Paul.

But will he return to the Democratic fold for the general election? "I don't know. There's a lot of time between then and now," he said.

Eric Grote, 54, of Hampton, a retired Air Force captain, combat medic and registered nurse, said, "I've seen what happens when things go wrong. ... I look at what's happening now and see us on the cusp of World War III."

Long a libertarian, Grote said he came back from Turkey, where he lives part of the year, to work and vote for Paul in the Iowa caucuses.

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