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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Arizona Hispanics Poised To Swing State Blue

42 minutes ago
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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Edit note: This report contains accounts of rape, violence and other disturbing events.

Sex trafficking wasn't a major concern in the early 1980s, when Beth Jacobs was a teenager. If you were a prostitute, the thinking went, it was your choice.

Jacobs thought that too, right up until she came to on the lot of a dark truck stop one night. She says she had asked a friendly-seeming man for a ride home that afternoon.

Jacobs says he gave her something in an old McDonald's cup — a drug — and as she was waking up the man announced that he was a pimp. Her pimp.

The Boston Citgo sign, all 3,600 square LED feet of which has served as the backdrop to Red Sox games since 1965, is now officially a "pending landmark."

Spanish Surrealist Salvador Dalí spent much of the 1940s in the U.S., avoiding World War II and its aftermath. He was a well-known fixture on the art scene in Monterey, Calif. — and that's where the largest collection of Dalí's work on the West Coast is now open to the public.

Copyright 2016 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

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How We Use Energy: Then And Now

Apr 3, 2013
Originally published on April 3, 2013 11:14 pm

Manufacturing in the U.S. still uses the most energy. But its share has been decreasing. That's partly because we've moved from energy-intensive manufacturing to a more service-based economy. And also partly because of a slowing population growth and improving energy efficiency.

And while homes have become more energy efficient, they're on average about 30 percent larger. Which means overall, the energy use in homes is about the same. (Economists call this the rebound effect — some of the energy savings from more efficiency gets wiped out by more use.)

The rebound effect is also apparent in the transportation sector. Since 1961, the number of people driving cars and trucks has increased. People are also driving more. Regulations requiring cars and trucks to become more energy efficient are trying to curb fuel use. The U.S. Energy Information Administration says these regulations (and the high the price for gas and lower incomes due to the recession) may have slowed the rise in demand for fuel for transportation. Still, the growth continues.

Here's where that energy came from:

In 1961, the largest portion of our energy (including the energy that used to generate electricity) came from crude oil. That's still true today. But the technological growth of renewable energy and the rise of electricity from nuclear power, means that crude oil's dominance is shrinking.

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