Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

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Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Donald Trump picked a military town — Virginia Beach, Va. — to give a speech Monday on how he would go about overhauling the Department of Veterans Affairs if elected.

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How Far Apart On Iran Are GOP Candidates, Obama?

Mar 8, 2012
Originally published on March 11, 2012 9:10 am

Republican presidential candidates this week — with the exception of Ron Paul — appeared to be trying to outdo each other in saying how tough they would be in dealing with Iran. Speaking before a pro-Israel group, they said President Obama has been weak — "feckless," in Mitt Romney's words.

Obama, meanwhile, was not impressed. He said he'd heard a lot of "bluster" and "big talk" about Iran, "but when you actually ask them specifically what they would do, it turns out they repeat the things that we've been doing over the last three years."

In some respects, the Republican candidates' proposals aren't that far off from what the Obama administration is already doing. They call for tough sanctions on Iran, for example, but it's hard to imagine any that are tougher than what the U.S. and its allies have in place now.

Still, there are some differences between Obama's Iran policy and what his Republican critics advocate.

Negotiations

No. 1: How much emphasis to put on negotiations. The Republican candidates all say they'd give some time to diplomacy, but would do it under stricter conditions.

Rick Santorum blasted Obama this week for being willing to join European countries in a new round of negotiations with Iran over its nuclear program.

"We now have an announcement that the administration has agreed to open talks with the Iranian government," he said. "That is in spite of U.N. resolutions that say they must stop the processing of their nuclear fuel in order to get those negotiations. Another appeasement, another opportunity for them to go forward while we talk."

In fact, the U.N. has called on Iran to suspend uranium enrichment, though not as a precondition for negotiations. Santorum's position: no talks until Iran agrees to stop enriching uranium. This is apparently what Israel wants as well. The Obama administration and its European allies say that condition would doom any negotiation.

Israeli Policy

This point brings up difference No. 2 on Iran between Obama and his challengers: It's on how closely to align U.S. policy with Israeli views.

The United States right now is determined to prevent Iran from acquiring an actual nuclear weapon. Israel, on the other hand, wants to prevent Iran from acquiring even the capability to develop a bomb. For that reason, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu says Israel "cannot wait much longer."

The main Republican candidates, in contrast to Obama, seem more willing to defer to Israel's judgment.

"Israel doesn't need public lectures about how to weigh decisions of war and peace," Romney said. "It needs our support."

Newt Gingrich went even further, saying he'd give the Israelis whatever intelligence and equipment they'd need to go to war against Iran and wouldn't even expect them to tell the United States when they were ready to move. He would give them this reassurance: "That if an Israeli prime minister decides that he has to avoid the threat of a second Holocaust through pre-emptive measures, that I would require no advance notice."

There's no such green light from the Obama administration, though the president did say Israel has the right to defend itself.

Military Options

Finally, a third case, this one of a subtle difference between the Republican candidates and the Obama administration: It's over how to signal that military options remain on the table.

Romney, writing in the Washington Post this week, said for example that to deal with Iran, he'd favor "restoring" the "regular presence" of U.S. aircraft carriers in the Persian Gulf and the Eastern Mediterranean. Right now, the U.S. military requires at least one, and generally two, carriers in the Gulf and none in the Eastern Mediterranean.

Moving more into the region would presumably send a message of military might to Iran, but it would mean fewer carriers deployed elsewhere in the world, and U.S. military officials says it's been many, many years since more than two aircraft carriers were assigned permanently to those waters.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

In a campaign that's focused on the economy and sometimes on culture wars, one foreign policy issue has received a lot of attention. Republican candidates Mitt Romney, Newt Gingrich and Rick Santorum all said again this week how tough they would be in dealing with Iran. They told a pro-Israel lobby group that President Obama is weak or feckless, as Romney said.

The president was not impressed. He said says he's heard a lot of quote, "bluster" and "big talk" about Iran...

(SOUNDBITE OF SPEECH)

PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA: But when you actually ask them specifically what they would do, it turns out they repeat the things that we've been doing over the last three years.

INSKEEP: That raises a question: How different are the Republican ideas from the president's policies?

NPR's Tom Gjelten makes a comparison.

TOM GJELTEN, BYLINE: In some respects, the Republican candidates' proposals aren't that far off from what the Obama administration is already doing. They call for tough sanctions on Iran, for example, but it's hard to imagine any that are tougher than what the United States and its allies have in place now. Still, there are some differences between Mr. Obama's Iran policy and what his Republican critics advocate. Number one: How much emphasis to put on negotiations. The Republican candidates all say they'd give some time to diplomacy, but would do it under stricter conditions. Listen to Rick Santorum blasting Mr. Obama this week for being willing to join European countries in a new round of negotiations with Iran over its nuclear program.

(SOUNDBITE OF SPEECH)

RICK SANTORUM: We now have an announcement that the administration has agreed to open talks with the Iranian government. That is in spite of U.N. resolutions that says they must stop the processing of their nuclear fuel in order to get those negotiations - another appeasement, another opportunity for them to go forward while we talk.

GJELTEN: In fact, the U.N. has called on Iran to suspend uranium enrichment, though not as a precondition for negotiations. Santorum's position: no talks until Iran agrees to stop enriching uranium. This is apparently what Israel wants, as well. The Obama administration and its European allies say that condition would doom any negotiation.

Now, this point brings up difference number two on Iran between Obama and his challengers: It's on how closely to align U.S. policy with Israeli views. The United States right now is determined to prevent Iran from acquiring an actual nuclear weapon. Israel, on the other hand, wants to prevent Iran from acquiring even the capability to develop a bomb. For that reason, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu says Israel cannot wait much longer. The main Republican candidates, in contrast to Mr. Obama, seem more willing to defer to Israel's judgment. Here's Mitt Romney.

(SOUNDBITE OF SPEECH)

MITT ROMNEY: Israel doesn't need public lectures about how to weigh decisions of war and peace. It needs our support.

GJELTEN: Newt Gingrich went even further, saying he'd give the Israelis whatever intelligence and equipment they'd need to go to war against Iran, and wouldn't even expect them to tell the United States when they were ready to move. He would give them this reassurance.

(SOUNDBITE OF SPEECH)

NEWT GINGRICH: That if an Israeli prime minister decides that he has to avoid the threat of a second Holocaust through preemptive measures, that I would require no advance notice.

GJELTEN: There's no such green light from the Obama administration, though the president did say Israel has the right to defend itself. Finally, a third case, this one of a subtle difference between the Republican candidates and the Obama administration: It's over how to signal that military options remain on the table.

Mitt Romney, writing in the Washington Post this week, said, for example, that to deal with Iran, he'd favor restoring - his words - the regular presence of U.S. aircraft carriers in the Persian Gulf and the Eastern Mediterranean. Right now, the U.S. military requires at least one, and generally two, carriers in the Gulf and none in the Eastern Mediterranean. Moving more into the region would presumably send a message of military might to Iran, but it would mean fewer carriers deployed elsewhere in the world, and U.S. military officials says it's been many, many years since more than two aircraft carriers were assigned permanently to those waters.

Tom Gjelten, NPR News, Washington. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.