A police officer is free on bond after being arrested following a rash of road-sign thefts in southeast Alabama.  Brantley Police Chief Titus Averett says officer Jeremy Ray Walker of Glenwood is on paid leave following his arrest in Pike County.  The 30-year-old Walker is charged with receiving stolen property.  Lt. Troy Johnson of the Pike County Sheriff's Office says an investigation began after someone reported that Walker was selling road signs from Crenshaw County.  Investigators contacted the county engineer and learned signs had been reported stolen from several roads.

NPR Politics presents the Lunchbox List: our favorite campaign news and stories curated from NPR and around the Web in digestible bites (100 words or less!). Look for it every weekday afternoon from now until the conventions.

Convention Countdown

The Republican National Convention is in 4 days in Cleveland.

The Democratic National Convention is in 11 days in Philadelphia.

NASA has released the first picture of Jupiter taken since the Juno spacecraft went into orbit around the planet on July 4.

The picture was taken on July 10. Juno was 2.7 million miles from Jupiter at the time. The color image shows some of the atmospheric features of the planet, including the giant red spot. You can also see three of Jupiter's moons in the picture: Io, Europa and Ganymede.

The Senate is set to approve a bill intended to change the way police and health care workers treat people struggling with opioid addictions.

My husband and I once took great pleasure in preparing meals from scratch. We made pizza dough and sauce. We baked bread. We churned ice cream.

Then we became parents.

Now there are some weeks when pre-chopped veggies and a rotisserie chicken are the only things between us and five nights of Chipotle.

Parents are busy. For some of us, figuring out how to get dinner on the table is a daily struggle. So I reached out to food experts, parents and nutritionists for help. Here is some of their (and my) best advice for making weeknight meals happen.

"O Canada," the national anthem of our neighbors up north, comes in two official versions — English and French. They share a melody, but differ in meaning.

Let the record show: neither version of those lyrics contains the phrase "all lives matter."

But at the 2016 All-Star Game, the song got an unexpected edit.

At Petco Park in San Diego, one member of the Canadian singing group The Tenors — by himself, according to the other members of the group — revised the anthem.

School's out, and a lot of parents are getting through the long summer days with extra helpings of digital devices.

How should we feel about that?

Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Pages

Holiday Jobs Come With Uncertainty For Workers

Oct 6, 2012
Originally published on October 6, 2012 7:55 pm

Retailers across the country expect to hire hundreds of thousands of extra workers this holiday season to help with the anticipated spike in sales. Retail workers who have been hustling year-round for more hours are looking at that news with a jaded eye — because the vast majority of these seasonal jobs will disappear after December, sending many of these workers back scrounging for more work.

With a 17-hour workweek, Onieka O'Kieffe is left with a lot of time on her hands. Too much time. She said she very often sleeps 12 hours a day just because she can.

"That's typically the case. Like, if there's nothing else to do," O'Kieffe said. "Because I'm mostly at home anyway."

O'Kieffe, 22, is a part-time manager at a hardware store in the Bronx called Harbor Freight Tools. She makes $10 an hour. When the store cut her hours weeks ago, she started making less than her little sister, who's a cashier at Burger King earning $7.25 an hour.

So O'Kieffe will be joining the estimated 600,000 retail workers grabbing up holiday jobs this year to supplement their incomes.

She said she has no choice — she and her sister live with their mother, who's on public assistance and doesn't work. And O'Kieffe said she's has $4,000 of credit card debt.

But scraping up a seasonal retail job isn't easy. O'Kieffe hit the streets of Midtown Manhattan this week to hunt down some work, darting in and out of Foot Locker, Sephora, Lush, Mango, Bebe, Aldo and Fossil. In store after store, she filled out job applications, dropped off her resume and picked up fliers for job events the stores were hosting. Repeatedly, clerks told her only part-time work was available, and no one promised a minimum number of hours.

Some of the biggest stores in the country have announced they're hiring more holiday workers this year than last — stores like Macy's, Toys R Us and Wal-Mart. But these jobs will be fleeting. And that's the catch for year-round retail workers who can never find enough work.

"So they can go from a 35-hour workweek in December to a five-hour workweek in January, and then see the company lay them off and then hire a whole new workforce in February for Valentine's Day," said Carrie Gleason, who heads Retail Action Project, a worker advocacy group.

U.S. Census data show the percentage of part-time retail workers who want to be full-time has doubled since 2006. And the hours aren't only scarce; they're unpredictable.

"You might get 15 hours, but you don't know what days they're going to be," said Susan Lambert, who studies low-wage labor at the University of Chicago. "And so that might require you, for example, if you're a parent, to have to arrange child care for five days a week — even though, really, you only end up working three days a week."

But retailers say it's not their fault if hiring is unpredictable, because the entire economy is unpredictable. And the holiday season means taking on even more risk than usual.

"Everything about the holiday season for retailers is a guessing game," said Ellen Davis of the National Retail Federation, a retail trade association. "How many people should I hire? What should my marketing and promotions be like? How much merchandise should I bring into my stores? And which stores should get more merchandise than others?"

Davis said retailers start making their seasonal hiring decisions in August or September. The dilemma for them, she explained, is that if they hire too few people, customers get annoyed. If they hire too many, they're saddled with high labor costs they can't justify with sales.

And the people caught in the middle are workers like O'Kieffe, who just need more hours.

"It sucks that those are the jobs being offered — like I'm only good enough for three months and then, like, that's it. I'm out with nothing," she said.

O'Kieffe dropped out of college because she needed a job to pay for two more years. She said she now has to pay back about $10,000 in student loans for the years she's already finished. So at this point, she has no idea if she'll ever get to go back to school.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

One sector of the economy that's expected to increase hiring is retail in anticipation of the holiday shopping season. That might sound like good news, but for a growing number of current retail workers who are hoping to get more hours of work, holiday hiring is not necessarily a good thing. NPR's Ailsa Chang reports the majority of these seasonal jobs will disappear after December, forcing many to scrounge for work all over again.

AILSA CHANG, BYLINE: When you're only working 17 hours a week, you end up with a lot of time on your hands. Too much time. Onieka O'Kieffe says she fills those hours by sleeping, often 12 hours a day.

ONIEKA O'KIEFFE: Yeah, that's typically the case. Like if there's nothing else to do, I'll, like sleep, 'cuz I'm mostly at home anyway.

CHANG: O'Kieffe, who's 22, is a part-time manager at a hardware store in the Bronx called Harbor Freight Tools. She makes 10 bucks an hour. When the store cut her hours weeks ago, she started making less than her little sister, who's a cashier at Burger King earning $7.25 an hour. So, O'Kieffe will be joining the estimated 600,000 retail workers grabbing up holiday jobs this year to supplement their incomes. And if you're shy, like O'Kieffe, you have to be extra persistent.

O'KIEFFE: Hi, excuse me.

CHANG: We're in a midtown Manhattan Foot Locker where she can't seem to get anyone's attentions right away. O'Kieffe says she has to find a second job this fall. She and her sister live with their mother who's on public assistance and doesn't work. O'Kieffe says she's in $4,000 of credit card debt.

O'KIEFFE: Hi, excuse me. My name is Onieka O'Kieffe. I was looking to see of you guys were hiring.

CHANG: By the end of the afternoon, O'Keiffe will have ducked into Levi's...

O'KIEFFE: Are you guys hiring?

CHANG: And Billabong.

O'KIEFFE: I was hoping to drop off a resume.

CHANG: And Sephora, Lush, Mango, Aldo and Fossil. Some of the biggest stores in the country have announced they're hiring more holiday workers this year than last; stores like Macy's, Toys R Us and Wal-Mart. But these jobs will be fleeting. And that's the catch for year-round retail workers who can never find enough work. Carrie Gleason heads Retail Action Project, a worker advocacy group.

CARRIE GLEASON: So they can go from a 35-hour workweek in December to a five-hour workweek in January, and then see the company lay them off and then hire a whole new workforce in February for Valentine's Day.

CHANG: U.S. Census data show the percentage of part-time retail workers who want to be full-time has doubled since 2006. And the hours aren't only scarce; they're unpredictable. Susan Lambert studies low-wage labor at the University of Chicago.

SUSAN LAMBERT: You might get 15 hours, but you don't know what days they're going to be. And so that might require you, for example, if you're a parent, to have to arrange child care for five days a week, even though, really, you only end up working three days a week.

CHANG: But retailers say it's not their fault if hiring is unpredictable because the entire economy is unpredictable. And the holiday season means taking on even more risk than usual. Ellen Davis is from the National Retail Federation.

ELLEN DAVIS: Everything about the holiday season for retailers is a guessing game. How many people should I hire? What should my marketing and promotions be like? How much merchandise should I bring into my stores? And which stores should get more merchandise than others?

CHANG: Davis said retailers start making their seasonal hiring decisions in August or September. If they hire too few people, customers get annoyed. If they too many, they're saddled with high labor costs they can't justify with sales. And the people caught in the middle are workers like O'Kieffe, who just need more hours.

O'KIEFFE: It sucks, you know, that those are the jobs being offered, like I'm only good enough for three months and then, like, that's it. I'm out with nothing.

CHANG: O'Kieffe dropped out of college because she needed a job to pay for two more years. She says she now has $10,000 of student loans for the years she's already finished. At this point, she has no idea if she'll ever get to go back. Ailsa Chang, NPR News.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

SIMON: And you're listening to NPR News. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.