Amid a sweeping crackdown on dissent in Egypt, security forces have forcibly disappeared hundreds of people since the beginning of 2015, according to a new report from Amnesty International.

It's an "unprecedented spike," the group says, with an average of three or four people disappeared every day.

The Republican Party, as it prepares for its convention next week has checked off item No. 1 on its housekeeping list — drafting a party platform. The document reflects the conservative views of its authors, many of whom are party activists. So don't look for any concessions to changing views among the broader public on key social issues.

Many public figures who took to Twitter and Facebook following the murder of five police officers in Dallas have faced public blowback and, in some cases, found their employers less than forgiving about inflammatory and sometimes hateful online comments.

As Venezuela unravels — with shortages of food and medicine, as well as runaway inflation — President Nicolas Maduro is increasingly unpopular. But he's still holding onto power.

"The truth in Venezuela is there is real hunger. We are hungry," says a man who has invited me into his house in the northwestern city of Maracaibo, but doesn't want his name used for fear of reprisals by the government.

The wiry man paces angrily as he speaks. It wasn't always this way, he says, showing how loose his pants are now.

Ask a typical teenage girl about the latest slang and girl crushes and you might get answers like "spilling the tea" and Taylor Swift. But at the Girl Up Leadership Summit in Washington, D.C., the answers were "intersectional feminism" — the idea that there's no one-size-fits-all definition of feminism — and U.N. climate chief Christiana Figueres.

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Arizona Hispanics Poised To Swing State Blue

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Editor's note: This report contains accounts of rape, violence and other disturbing events.

Sex trafficking wasn't a major concern in the early 1980s, when Beth Jacobs was a teenager. If you were a prostitute, the thinking went, it was your choice.

Jacobs thought that too, right up until she came to, on the lot of a dark truck stop one night. She says she had asked a friendly-seeming man for a ride home that afternoon.

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Hiring Julie Hermann, Rutgers Seeks A New Era In Athletics

May 16, 2013
Originally published on May 16, 2013 10:18 am

Rutgers University officials are welcoming the arrival of new athletic director Julie Hermann as the beginning of a new era, as the school seeks to rebound from the turmoil that recently engulfed its athletics department.

The hiring of Hermann, who most recently was the executive senior associate director of athletics at Louisville, comes one month after the school fired its basketball coach, Mike Rice, who was shown in video recordings to have shoved and verbally abused his players during practices.

Days after Rice was fired, the state university of New Jersey accepted the resignation of athletic director Tim Pernetti, opening the way for a new athletics regime at the school.

"It's a pleasure to welcome Julie Hermann to the Rutgers community," school President Robert Barchi said. "She is one of the most respected athletics administrators in the country. ... Her 15 years of leadership experience will be an invaluable asset to the university as we prepare to enter the Big Ten."

Rutgers says Hermann was chosen from a pool of 63 candidates.

Hermann, 49, is a graduate of the University of Nebraska, where she played volleyball. Before heading to Louisville, she coached at flagship universities in Wyoming, Georgia and Tennessee. And as her hiring was announced, Hermann declared a new day at Rutgers.

"We will no longer have any practice, anywhere, anytime, that anybody couldn't walk into and be pleased about what's going on in that environment," Hermann said Wednesday. "It is a new day. It is already fixed, and there's no one that doesn't agree about how we treat young people with respect, and dignity, and build trust."

As The Star-Ledger's Steve Politi writes, Hermann was at Louisville during its dramatic turnaround:

"She worked for 15 years with arguably the best AD in college sports, watching as [Tom] Jurich turned a scandal-ridden Conference USA program into one of the most complete athletic departments in the country and, starting in 2014, the newest member of the ACC."

Rutgers will begin playing in the Big Ten next year. With the hire of Hermann, there are now three women heading the athletic departments of universities in the top tier of sports; the others are Sandy Barbour of UC Berkeley and Debbie Yow of N.C. State.

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