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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to arbitration at the Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Donald Trump picked a military town, Virginia Beach, Va., to give a speech Tuesday on how he would go about reforming the Department of Veterans Affairs if elected.

He blamed the Obama administration for a string of scandals at the VA during the past two years, and claimed that his rival, Hillary Clinton, has downplayed the problems and won't fix them.

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The season for blueberries used to be short. You'd find fresh berries in the store just during a couple of months in the middle of summer.

Now, though, it's always blueberry season somewhere. Blueberry production is booming. The berries are grown in Florida, North Carolina, New Jersey, Michigan and the Pacific Northwest — not to mention the southern hemisphere.

But in any one location, the season is still short. And this means that workers follow the blueberry harvest, never staying in one place for long.

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With Help, Teens Can Manage Epilepsy

Nov 29, 2011

When Etrudy Mitchell's daughter had her first epileptic seizure at 16 months old, it started off looking like a run of the mill temper tantrum.

"We thought that she was just wanting something that she couldn't have," Mitchell tells host Michel Martin on NPR's Tell Me More. But within moments, the situation took a dramatic turn. "She turned blue. The body turned limp, and we dialed 911."

Ellen Woods had a similar experience when her previously healthy 11-year-old son came in from playing basketball one afternoon and complained of being dizzy. Since her back was turned, she thought the noise she was hearing was him kicking the wall. But when she looked, she found him in the middle of a seizure.

Nearly 1 in 20 children will experience a seizure, Martin points out.

Epilepsy can be terrifying. Once referred to as "the falling sickness," this chronic condition involves abnormal firing in the brain, causing a person to lose motor control. And that can lead to shaking, staring spells, repetitive hand, arm, or mouth movements, or weird noises and incomprehensible words.

Sometimes, it leaves parents wondering whether their child will require lifelong supervision. "We really have very good options to make this chronic disorder very well controlled," says Dr. Imad Najm, an epilepsy specialist at the Cleveland Clinic. Around two-thirds of epileptic patients respond well to at least one of the 18 or so drugs approved to treat the condition, and others benefit from surgery. In the future, devices that deliver electrical pulses to the brain may also be approved as a way of decreasing seizures.

The past couple years have also seen great progress in explaining the disease.

That first seizure can still be a horrific sight for an unprepared parent, but Woods says it gets less scary over time.

The goal of parents whose children have epilepsy, Mitchell adds, is to minimize their own fears and instill their children with confidence, independence, and as normal and full a life as possible.

Both parents discuss the importance of having a family emergency plan. Also, they say it's vital that everyone who cares for a child with epilepsy, no matter how briefly, be aware of the condition and prepared to monitor a seizure or call emergency services if necessary.

Woods says her son, who is now 16, does have some rules that are different from his peers. He's not allowed to play football, because the risk of a brain injury is too high to tolerate.

But like his friends, he is learning to drive. Along with that, he's responsible for knowing what could trigger a seizure, including sleep deprivation and dehydration, and making responsible choices about when to get behind the wheel.

So while children and teens with epilepsy experience limitations, they are not relegated to a life of dependence. "They're gonna be able to live their life, but it's a life that is lived with moderation," Najm says.

Copyright 2011 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.