Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Donald Trump picked a military town — Virginia Beach, Va. — to give a speech Monday on how he would go about overhauling the Department of Veterans Affairs if elected.

He blamed the Obama administration for a string of scandals at the VA during the past two years, and claimed that his rival, Hillary Clinton, has downplayed the problems and won't fix them.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Grumbling, Excitement Build For London Olympics

Feb 1, 2012

The last time the British did this, they had a king: George VI, the father of Queen Elizabeth, was on the throne.

George was so often tongue-tied, yet he proclaimed open the 1948 London Olympics flawlessly.

It was late July. The sun shone down on London from a cloudless sky. The BBC had acquired the TV broadcasting rights for just $4,000 and made the most of them.

People packed Wembley Stadium, eager to forget the horrors of the second world war.

The 1948 Olympics are known as the austerity games. London was rebuilding after being bombed to smithereens by Hitler. Food and gas were still rationed. The athletes had no luxurious Olympic Village. They slept in military barracks, or colleges.

The Olympics are back — and, despite these difficult economic times, this time, they'll be far grander.

The scale is breathtaking: 23,000 athletes and officials — double that, if you add the security people, not to mention 20,000 journalists.

An industrial wasteland in one of London's poorest areas has been turned into a giant Olympic Park with a stunning new stadium as the centerpiece. Most of the games will be concentrated in the park — but not all. The beach volleyball is just a hop, skip and a jump from Buckingham Palace.

The Brits are breaking records even before the starting gun. They're erecting their biggest piece of public art — a twisted steel sculpture, taller than Big Ben, their answer to the Eiffel Tower. Visitors can dine at the world's biggest McDonald's in a capital with record-breaking surveillance.

"Within London we have probably the largest network of CCTV cameras anywhere in the world," says security expert Tobias Feakin. "I mean, just walking down Whitehall, I will be filmed approximately 300 times per day — by different cameras."

The British, who love a good moan, have been griping a bit about all this.

Getting tickets online has been pretty chaotic. Security costs are rocketing. So far, though, the grumbling has been subdued.

"Excitement is beginning to build," says Jules Pipe, mayor of Hackney, which contains part of the Olympic Park. "I have always said, by the time we get to the Olympics, everyone's going to be a fan."

There were riots on his patch only last summer. Don't be alarmed, says Pipe.

"There wasn't a single building set along in the borough of Hackney," he says. "Yes, there was some rioting in the streets but that was in common with many other places in the country."

In a down-at-heel east London market, close to the Olympic Park, you find mixed opinions about playing host.

Carol Porter won't be budging from the vegetable stall where she has worked for the past 16 years.

"I shall just be serving here anyway, whether they are doing high jump or frog jump or whatever," she says. "I shall just be here."

But for all that, I have a sneaking feeling she's looking forward to it.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.