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The Republican National Convention is in 4 days in Cleveland.

The Democratic National Convention is in 11 days in Philadelphia.

NASA has released the first picture of Jupiter taken since the Juno spacecraft went into orbit around the planet on July 4.

The picture was taken on July 10. Juno was 2.7 million miles from Jupiter at the time. The color image shows some of the atmospheric features of the planet, including the giant red spot. You can also see three of Jupiter's moons in the picture: Io, Europa and Ganymede.

The Senate is set to approve a bill intended to change the way police and health care workers treat people struggling with opioid addictions.

My husband and I once took great pleasure in preparing meals from scratch. We made pizza dough and sauce. We baked bread. We churned ice cream.

Then we became parents.

Now there are some weeks when pre-chopped veggies and a rotisserie chicken are the only things between us and five nights of Chipotle.

Parents are busy. For some of us, figuring out how to get dinner on the table is a daily struggle. So I reached out to food experts, parents and nutritionists for help. Here is some of their (and my) best advice for making weeknight meals happen.

"O Canada," the national anthem of our neighbors up north, comes in two official versions — English and French. They share a melody, but differ in meaning.

Let the record show: neither version of those lyrics contains the phrase "all lives matter."

But at the 2016 All-Star Game, the song got an unexpected edit.

At Petco Park in San Diego, one member of the Canadian singing group The Tenors — by himself, according to the other members of the group — revised the anthem.

School's out, and a lot of parents are getting through the long summer days with extra helpings of digital devices.

How should we feel about that?

Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she disparaged him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb political statements" about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

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Grow Your Own Locust Kit Could Someday Help Feed African Refugees

Aug 28, 2012
Originally published on October 15, 2012 10:36 am

When it comes to environmentally-friendly meat, insects can't be beat. As The Salt reported last year, grasshoppers, crickets, and beetles are four times more efficient at converting grasses into protein-packed meat than cattle. Insects generate less greenhouse gases than cows, eat just about anything and survive in dry, inhospitable environments.

That's why two industrial engineering students want to use insects as emergency food for families living in Africa's largest refugee camp in Kenya where water, livestock and resources for farming aren't available.

Nicolas Pena Parra and Lea Bailly from L'Ecole de design Nantes Atlantique in France recently designed an aid kit (see this animated video on how it works) that consists of two cardboard compartments folded together, with one side for eggs and pupae and the other side for adult locust. The kit also includes instructions for how to feed and harvest the grasshoppers and to get the farm going with egg-laying females.

The product is still in the preliminary stages of development, but from what we can tell, it's the first of its kind. The team recently built a prototype bug kit and entered it in the The James Dyson Award, an international design competition.

Arnold van Huis, an entomologist at Wageningen University in Belgium, thinks the idea just might work.

That's because Van Huis, who studies the global culinary use of insects, says that locusts and grasshoppers are already commonly eaten in Kenya and other parts of eastern Africa. In some regions, the insects are even considered an delicacy.

"People collect locust after a plague for eating," van Huis says. "I've even seen woman harvest grasshoppers from their millet plants and earn more money from selling the grasshoppers than from the millet itself."

Parra and Bailly designed the kit specifically to help families in a Kenyan refugee camp, called Dadaab, which is located about 100 kilometers from the Somalia border. Dadaab is run by the United Nations and offers food and medical services to more than a half million people fleeing violence and famine around the area.

They learned about the camp during a class assignment, and decided to create a product that might help with the malnutrition problems facing the camp's residents.

Van Huis says that the insects would provide another source of high-quality protein for the refugees — in addition to the rice, wheat, beans and some Vitamin A oil they receive.

"They are quite rich in micronutrients, such as iodine, which can be a problem for children and pregnant women in refugee camps," Van Huis tells The Salt.

So what are the downsides to the kit? One major issue may be water.

"It is dangerous to say that locusts need less water than other livestock," van Huis says. If the locusts can eat local foliage, which is packed with water, this won't be issue, but if the families feed the locusts freeze dried grass, the bugs will still need clean water.

Parra and Bailly will find out Thursday if they advance to next round of the Dyson competition and are still in the running for the top prize, which is about $16,000 in U.S. dollars. That money would go a long way towards creating a buzz about the kits.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.