Amid a sweeping crackdown on dissent in Egypt, security forces have forcibly disappeared hundreds of people since the beginning of 2015, according to a new report from Amnesty International.

It's an "unprecedented spike," the group says, with an average of three or four people disappeared every day.

The Republican Party, as it prepares for its convention next week has checked off item No. 1 on its housekeeping list — drafting a party platform. The document reflects the conservative views of its authors, many of whom are party activists. So don't look for any concessions to changing views among the broader public on key social issues.

Many public figures who took to Twitter and Facebook following the murder of five police officers in Dallas have faced public blowback and, in some cases, found their employers less than forgiving about inflammatory and sometimes hateful online comments.

As Venezuela unravels — with shortages of food and medicine, as well as runaway inflation — President Nicolas Maduro is increasingly unpopular. But he's still holding onto power.

"The truth in Venezuela is there is real hunger. We are hungry," says a man who has invited me into his house in the northwestern city of Maracaibo, but doesn't want his name used for fear of reprisals by the government.

The wiry man paces angrily as he speaks. It wasn't always this way, he says, showing how loose his pants are now.

Ask a typical teenage girl about the latest slang and girl crushes and you might get answers like "spilling the tea" and Taylor Swift. But at the Girl Up Leadership Summit in Washington, D.C., the answers were "intersectional feminism" — the idea that there's no one-size-fits-all definition of feminism — and U.N. climate chief Christiana Figueres.

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Arizona Hispanics Poised To Swing State Blue

2 hours ago
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Editor's note: This report contains accounts of rape, violence and other disturbing events.

Sex trafficking wasn't a major concern in the early 1980s, when Beth Jacobs was a teenager. If you were a prostitute, the thinking went, it was your choice.

Jacobs thought that too, right up until she came to, on the lot of a dark truck stop one night. She says she had asked a friendly-seeming man for a ride home that afternoon.

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GOP Says, Why Not Delay That Health Care Law, Like, Forever?

Jul 10, 2013
Originally published on July 10, 2013 5:51 pm

Sensing that recent delays in key portions of the Affordable Care Act have caught the Obama administration at a weak point in its rollout of the law, Republicans in Congress are doubling down on their efforts to cripple the measure, at least in the eyes of the public if not in fact.

"Rather than a partial delay for some, America needs a permanent delay for all," said Sen. John Thune, R-S.D., at a news conference Wednesday on Capitol Hill. Thune got 45 other GOP senators to sign onto a letter to the president urging him to shelve the law entirely.

"It's becoming ever more clear that the Affordable Care Act, ObamaCare, fails to accomplish its intended purposes," said Sen. Jerry Moran, R-Kan., at the press conference.

Moran said hat he would be offering amendments to try to block key aspects of the law during Thursday's Committee on Appropriations markup on funding for the Department of Health and Human Services. His amendments include one that would bar funding to enforce the individual mandate, requiring people to get health insurance or pay a fine.

Across the Capitol, where GOP leaders have already vowed to hold a vote to delay that very individual mandate, the House Ways and Means health subcommittee held a hearing, allegedly to explore what it called the administration's "strangely timed announcement" that it was delaying the employer mandate.

That announcement came on a Tuesday evening, via a blog post, two days before the July 4 holiday.

"You have to wonder, if ObamaCare isn't ready for businesses, is it ready for my family?" asked subcommittee Chairman Kevin Brady, R-Texas, at the hearing. "Clearly the rollout of ObamaCare is in disarray and experts are questioning whether the White House is competent enough to administer its own massive health care law."

Democrats, however, said Republicans were overreacting.

"We don't know exactly what the landscape will look like in January, but it's entirely possible this decision will help consumers," said Rep. Jim McDermott, D-Wash, at the subcommittee hearing. "Employees who remain uncovered will be able to find assistance through tax credits and other subsidies in the federal 'marketplace' or their state exchange. The delay will also give businesses time to adjust and for the community to work with Treasury to figure out the most efficient and effective way to comply with the law."

And witness Timothy Jost, a professor at the Washington and Lee University School of Law and a longtime backer of the Affordable Care Act, accused the panel's Republicans of trying to sabotage the measure.

"If you actually care whether ACA implementation will help your constituents, take action immediately to appropriate the money needed to get the job done," he said. "If you're not willing to help with the job of ACA implementation, you have no standing to complain of delays."

At least some panel Republicans, however, clearly had bigger issues on their minds.

"We see this as not some political issue, about having the bill fail," said Devin Nunes, R-Calif. "We see this as something that definitely leans toward socialism."

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