The deaths last week of three African-American men in encounters with police, along with the killing of five Dallas officers by a black shooter, have left many African-American gun owners with conflicting feelings; those range from shock to anger and defiance. As the debate over gun control heats up, some African-Americans see firearms as critical to their safety, especially in times of racial tension.

Please do not catch virtual monsters among the graves of fallen soldiers.

This is the message from authorities at Arlington National Cemetery, aimed at those who might use the hit mobile game Pokémon Go at the cemetery.

A quick consultation with Dr. Google will tell you that drinking lots of water — and staying well-hydrated — can help you lose weight.

But is there any truth to this? A new study published in the Annals of Family Medicine adds to the evidence that hydration may play a role in weight management.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Following the deadliest attack on law enforcement since Sept. 11, President Obama and former President George W. Bush attended an interfaith memorial on Tuesday to honor the five law enforcement officers killed during a peaceful protest in Dallas.

Attorney General Loretta Lynch testified before the House Judiciary Committee for several hours on Tuesday, fielding questions about the probe of Hillary Clinton's emails during her tenure as secretary of state, the backlog of cases in immigration courts, the mass shooting in Orlando, the two police shooting deaths in Minnesota and Louisiana, and the murders of police officers in Dallas, among other things.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Pages

Glitches Return To HealthCare.Gov As Enrollment Clock Expires

Mar 31, 2014
Originally published on March 31, 2014 3:29 pm

The last day of sign-ups for health insurance on the HealthCare.gov website is turning out to have a lot in common with the first: lots of computer problems.

But there are some big differences, too. Back in October the not-ready-for-prime-time website was only able to enroll six people on its first day.

Today's issues included an outage lasting several hours during the early hours of Monday morning. By midday on the East Coast, new enrollments had stalled, apparently caused by a deluge of visitors to the site.

There were 1.2 million visitors through noon, and more than 109,000 concurrent visitors at the biggest peak of the day up to that point, according to Health and Human Services spokeswoman Joanne Peters.

Because that peak traffic is more than the 100,000 users the site is built to handle at any one time, people have been fed into a queuing system that asks them to leave their email address and be invited back later to complete their enrollment.

NPR White House correspondent Scott Horsley reports getting invited back after about 40 minutes when he left his information at around 1 p.m.

Administration officials confirm that anyone who leaves an email on the site will be counted as having made enough of an effort to obtain insurance to secure an extension that will entitle them to purchase coverage after tonight's midnight deadline has passed.

It also appears that end-of-enrollment surge could bring the total number of sign-ups very close to the 7 million originally predicted by the Congressional Budget Office. On Thursday, the administration announced enrollment had reached the CBO's revised 6 million estimate made after the botched launch last October.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.