NASA has released the first picture of Jupiter taken since the Juno spacecraft went into orbit around the planet on July 4.

The picture was taken on July 10. Juno was 2.7 million miles from Jupiter at the time. The color image shows some of the atmospheric features of the planet, including the giant red spot. You can also see three of Jupiter's moons in the picture: Io, Europa and Ganymede.

The Senate is set to approve a bill intended to change the way police and health care workers treat people struggling with opioid addictions.

My husband and I once took great pleasure in preparing meals from scratch. We made pizza dough and sauce. We baked bread. We churned ice cream.

Then we became parents.

Now there are some weeks when pre-chopped veggies and a rotisserie chicken are the only things between us and five nights of Chipotle.

Parents are busy. For some of us, figuring out how to get dinner on the table is a daily struggle. So I reached out to food experts, parents and nutritionists for help. Here is some of their (and my) best advice for making weeknight meals happen.

"O Canada," the national anthem of our neighbors up north, comes in two official versions — English and French. They share a melody, but differ in meaning.

Let the record show: neither version of those lyrics contains the phrase "all lives matter."

But at the 2016 All-Star Game, the song got an unexpected edit.

At Petco Park in San Diego, one member of the Canadian singing group The Tenors — by himself, according to the other members of the group — revised the anthem.

School's out, and a lot of parents are getting through the long summer days with extra helpings of digital devices.

How should we feel about that?

Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she disparaged him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb political statements" about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

Pages

Glaxo Settlement Pulls Back Curtain On Drug Marketing

Jul 3, 2012
Originally published on July 4, 2012 4:30 am

As part of a landmark $3 billion settlement of health fraud charges by GlaxoSmithKline, the government released a slew of documents that serve as a one-stop guide to alleged sales practices that ran rampant for years.

The British drugmaker agreed to plead guilty to three misdemeanor charges. But the settlement of civil claims, Glaxo said in a statement, "does not constitute an admission of any liability or wrongdoing in the selling and marketing of Lamictal, Zofran, Imitrex, Lotronex, Flovent, Valtrex, Avandia or Advair products."

Glaxo CEO Sir Andrew Witty said in a statement that the practices "originate in a different era for the company" and that it has turned over a new leaf.

Still, the old leaf, as described in the Justice Department's complaint and other documents, has some alleged doozies. Here are a few.

Take, for instance, Glaxo's alleged hiring of celebrity doctor Drew Pinsky through a PR firm to talk up the unproven use of the antidepressant Wellbutrin SR as a remedy for sexual dysfunction. The government's complaint says the company indirectly paid him $275,000 in 1999 for that work, some of which is described in this memo and a transcript from a radio interview that year.

In a statement to The Wall Street Journal, Dr. Pinsky said:

"In the late '90s I was hired to participate in a two-year initiative discussing intimacy and depression which was funded by an educational grant by Glaxo Wellcome," one of the companies that later merged to form GlaxoSmithKline. He added that the campaign "included town hall meetings, writings and multimedia activities in conjunction with [a] patient advocacy group." He added, "My comments were consistent with my clinical experience."

If you've never been to a pharmaceutical sales meeting, the documents offer you the next best thing. The government alleged that Glaxo promoted Advair, an asthma remedy combining two drugs, for use as a first-choice treatment for just about anybody with asthma. The Food and Drug Administration, concerned about risks, took a much narrower view and approved Advair only as a first-line therapy for patients with severe asthma.

That didn't stop Glaxo, according to the complaint. The company's CEO at the time, J.P. Garnier, allegedly told sales reps at a launch meeting held in Las Vegas in 2001 about a conversation he'd had with a doctor about Advair:

"[H]e said, and you can quote him everywhere you want in the [United States], 'He said it would be criminal not to put an asthmatic patient on Advair' It would be criminal."

And later in the complaint, the government alleges that Glaxo paid kickbacks in the form of gifts, consulting and speaking fees, entertainment and a whole lot more. One exhibit to the complaint explains how drug reps in New England could get tickets to sporting events for meetings with doctors.

Some of these alleged activities wouldn't pass muster with the drug industry's voluntary code for company's dealings with doctors. But the Glaxo settlement and other similar ones agreed to by large drugmakers suggest marketing excesses were pervasive.

Only last year, Deirdre Connelly, Glaxo's U.S. president, said publicly that the drug industry had "lost its way." She faulted a "competitive selling model" that is fine for cars or candy, but isn't appropriate for prescription medicines. Change is needed, she said, and a big one at Glaxo was to eliminate bonuses for sales reps based on increases in prescriptions in their territories.

This post was updated to include Dr. Pinsky's comments to The Wall Street Journal.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.