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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to arbitration at the Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Donald Trump picked a military town, Virginia Beach, Va., to give a speech Tuesday on how he would go about reforming the Department of Veterans Affairs if elected.

He blamed the Obama administration for a string of scandals at the VA during the past two years, and claimed that his rival, Hillary Clinton, has downplayed the problems and won't fix them.

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The season for blueberries used to be short. You'd find fresh berries in the store just during a couple of months in the middle of summer.

Now, though, it's always blueberry season somewhere. Blueberry production is booming. The berries are grown in Florida, North Carolina, New Jersey, Michigan and the Pacific Northwest — not to mention the southern hemisphere.

But in any one location, the season is still short. And this means that workers follow the blueberry harvest, never staying in one place for long.

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Gingrich's Remarks On Immigration Surprises Many

Nov 23, 2011

Republican presidential candidate Newt Gingrich is getting lots of attention for his remarks about immigration in Wednesday night's debate. Gingrich has been moving up in the polls and last night he broke with his fellow candidates by saying that some illegal immigrants should be allowed to stay in the U.S. Though his statements were in line with other GOP candidates from years past, the aftershocks show just how narrow the immigration debate has been in recent years.

Gingrich spouted the typical Repubican line in last night's debate,

"If you've come here recently you have no ties to this country you oughta go home period," he said.

But his next statement was what raised eyebrows.

"If you've been here 25 years you got three kids and two grandkids you've been paying taxes and obeying the law you belong to a local church I don't think were gonna separate you from your family, uproot you forcefully, and kick you out," Gingrich said.

That got a lot of pushback from Gingrich's fellow candidates and a lot of attention today but his statement is not radical.

"This is a position that's consistent with what an important element in the Republican party has believed and argued for, for a long time," says Doris Meissner, a senior fellow with the bi-partisan Migration Policy Institute in Washington, D.C. She was also head of the Immigration and Naturalization Service under President Clinton. Meissner says up until the last few years, Gingrich's was the mainstream view.

"By centrists, by people who have represented business and employers, and more internationally oriented views within the Republican party," Meissner says.

Meissner is describing people like President George W. Bush and Arizona Senator John McCain—both of whom pushed legislation to legalize some undocumented immigrants and create a guest worker program. That effort failed as Republicans became focused on border security. That led to enforcement-only legislation in Congress and Republican-led state laws intended to crack down on illegal immigration in states like Arizona and Alabama. Candidate Mitt Romney sounded that note last night.

"To saying that we're gonna say to the people who come here illegally that now you're all gonna get to stay or some large number are gonna get to stay and become permanent residents of the United States, that will only encourage more people to do the same thing," Romney said.

That argument is based on what happened after Ronald Reagan granted amnesty to three million illegal immigrants in 1986, a move Gingrich supported while in Congress. Since then, many more people have come illegally.

But in the last decade, the U.S. also built some 700 miles of fencing, added roughly 20,000 border patrol agents and put in place drones, sensors and other technology. Fewer people are crossing the border illegally.

And the Obama Administration is deporting record numbers of people already here. With those facts in mind, Gingrich seems to be taking a calculated steps, talking not just about guns and fences, but families.

"As somebody who believes strongly in family you're going to have a hard time explaining why that particular subset is being broken up and forced to leave given the fact that they've been law-abiding citizens for the last 25 years," Gingrich said at the debate.

Gingrich was not pressed on the specifics of his proposal. But Meissner says, regardless, his remarks are shrewd politically.

"The Republican party in it's very harsh and unyielding recent stance on illegal immigration has alienated itself from the single-largest bloc of voters that are in play in the future in our political system and that is Latino, Hispanic voters."

At the very least, Newt Gingrich is differentiating himself from his fellow Republican candidates. And he may help his party in the long-run, if not himself, by broadening the immigration issue after several years of narrowing.

Copyright 2011 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.